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Topic Summary

Posted by: nacho
« on: February 26, 2015, 02:54:07 PM »

Nice. We should enjoy this brief moment before we have to answer to Google for every step we take.
Posted by: monkey!
« on: February 26, 2015, 02:52:23 PM »

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-31638528

Quote
Net neutrality rules passed by US regulator
Posted by: monkey!
« on: February 20, 2015, 08:51:11 AM »

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-31545050

Quote

US and UK accused of hacking Sim card firm to steal codes


US and British intelligence agencies hacked into a major manufacturer of Sim cards in order to steal codes that facilitate eavesdropping on mobiles, a US news website says. The Intercept says the revelations came from US intelligence contractor turned whistleblower Edward Snowden. The Dutch company allegedly targeted - Gemalto - says it is taking the allegations "very seriously". It operates in 85 countries and has more than 40 manufacturing facilities.

The Intercept says that "the great Sim heist" gave US and British surveillance agencies "the potential to secretly monitor a large portion of the world's cellular communications, including both voice and data". It says that among the clients of the Netherlands-based company are AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Sprint and "some 450 wireless network providers around the world".
Posted by: Reginald McGraw
« on: February 04, 2015, 03:11:17 PM »

Yes, this would be good. Congress is being lobbied heavily to disallow Internet == a utility.
Posted by: monkey!
« on: February 04, 2015, 02:50:28 PM »

This is good... supposing it works.

http://www.cnet.com/news/fcc-chairman-wheeler-to-use-utility-style-rules-to-enforce-net-neutrality/

Quote

FCC chief confirms he wants utility-style rules to enforce Net neutrality


The new rules would prohibit speeding up, slowing down or blocking broadband Internet traffic, under a rule that dates back to the early days of the telephone business.
Posted by: nacho
« on: March 21, 2014, 11:03:13 AM »

Quote
"I don't care what the international community says at all. Everyone will see the power of the Turkish Republic," Mr Erdogan said in a speech on Thursday.


BEHOLD! The power of the Turkish Republic! TREMBLE!!
Posted by: monkey!
« on: March 21, 2014, 10:59:20 AM »

Quote
"I don't care what the international community says at all. Everyone will see the power of the Turkish Republic," Mr Erdogan said in a speech on Thursday.
Posted by: monkey!
« on: March 21, 2014, 10:58:38 AM »

Turkey's government is blocking Twitter now... since yesterday.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-26681236

Posted by: monkey!
« on: April 30, 2013, 01:01:27 PM »

Posted by: nacho
« on: March 02, 2012, 11:35:15 AM »

Nice.
Posted by: monkey!
« on: March 02, 2012, 10:45:33 AM »

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1009_3-57389119-83/antisec-dumps-monsanto-data-on-the-web/?part=rss&subj=news&tag=title

Quote
AntiSec dumps Monsanto data on the Web

"Your continued attack on the worlds food supply, as well as the health of those who eat it, has earned you our full attention," wrote AntiSec. "Your crimes against humanity are too many to name on one page."
Posted by: monkey!
« on: February 28, 2012, 01:09:52 PM »

http://news.cnet.com/8301-27080_3-57386347-245/how-anonymous-channels-the-will-of-the-people-q-a/?part=rss&subj=news&tag=title

Quote
How Anonymous channels 'the will of the people'

The Anonymous online activists do keep themselves busy. When they're not defacing Web sites to protest the for-profit prison system or shutting down the public CIA site they're listening in as Scotland Yard and the FBI discuss how to catch them and having a good laugh.

This week, they've ratcheted things up even more by working with WikiLeaks to publish secret stolen e-mails that shine some light on what appear to be the inner workings of Stratfor, a global intelligence firm that seems to have paid informants to monitor, among other things, human rights and environmental activists on behalf of Dow Chemical after the Bhopal disaster, and that allegedly considered using the intelligence it gathers from insiders to grow a strategic investment fund. The company has declined to confirm or deny the contents of the e-mails released, except to suggest that some of them may be forged or altered while some may be authentic.
Posted by: Reginald McGraw
« on: February 03, 2012, 09:13:16 AM »

It makes perfect sense! Terrorists want online privacy, so it stands to reason that all privacy lovers are terrorists!
Posted by: monkey!
« on: February 02, 2012, 06:08:19 PM »

I didn't know where else to put this, but... wow, this is insane. McCarthyism tactics have found a new focus.

http://publicintelligence.net/do-you-like-online-privacy-you-may-be-a-terrorist/