Great Society

Taken for Granite => Intensive Porpoises => Topic started by: nacho on June 11, 2008, 10:09:57 PM

Title: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on June 11, 2008, 10:09:57 PM
Because I NEED to kill time at work or else I'll start doing hard drugs, post weird mystery shit in here.  Things that are unsolved only.  Disappearances, weird shit, etc.

And, yes, I have the keys to the Bermuda Triangle and I'll be back by 11pm.  Don't post that shit. We all know that.

An example of what we all don't know about, is the Sweating Sickness.  Origins unknown, almost always fatal within hours, and vanished just as mysteriously as it appeared.  Though Wikipedia has theories, of course:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweating_sickness
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Cassander on June 15, 2008, 12:24:38 AM
What about the Sally Hemmings debate?  Did one of America's greatest figures repeatedly impregnate his wife's half-sister and own his own offspring as slaves?  or are you more in the x-files realm?
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Cassander on June 15, 2008, 12:31:19 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_revenant

Revenants! 

So, obviously they belong to the folklore realm, but apparently several exhumations in English cemeteries have shown corpses buried in the manner mentioned in these medieval accounts: the head removed and placed between the legs.  of course, this trope continues today in zombie stories. 

so, if not true, then what was happening?  Apparently no one on wikipedia is learn-ed enough to offer explanations.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Cassander on June 15, 2008, 12:32:33 AM
oh, and did you ever look this up? 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodsmen_of_the_World

very odd that their wiki entry has little history or explanation of the workings of the organization.  i'm not saying they're as occultic as the Masons, but obviously their little club is still going very strong. 
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on June 17, 2008, 10:32:04 AM
What about the Sally Hemmings debate?  Did one of America's greatest figures repeatedly impregnate his wife's half-sister and own his own offspring as slaves?  or are you more in the x-files realm?

The trouble here is that, while we don't have the answer either way, anyone who reads about Jefferson outside of the classroom history books readily accepts any hideous thing you accuse him of.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on June 17, 2008, 10:36:14 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_revenant

Revenants! 

So, obviously they belong to the folklore realm, but apparently several exhumations in English cemeteries have shown corpses buried in the manner mentioned in these medieval accounts: the head removed and placed between the legs.  of course, this trope continues today in zombie stories. 

so, if not true, then what was happening?  Apparently no one on wikipedia is learn-ed enough to offer explanations.

Visited a grave in Buckfastleigh (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckfastleigh) where a local landlord was buried, rose to kill, then was reburied and had a little jail cell built around the tomb.  Wild stuff. The lesson for all those thousands of years before machines in the hospital confirmed death is to never breathe shallowly when you're near death.

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: fajwat on June 17, 2008, 11:07:33 AM
Found this while looking for historical cadaver staking:

Serbian dictator's grave staked to prevent him rising from the dead:

http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_2229686.html

Anyhow, about vampires: the version I've heard is that people had been accidentally buried alive and would come back in zombified (and unhappy) states, having dug themselves out.

To prevent this, stakes were mounted inside coffins, to make damned sure that everyone who was only nearly dead was truly dead before they were buried. 
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 12, 2008, 03:12:53 PM
Aaron Burr's kid!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodosia_Burr_Alston#Disappearance

Burr's "last stand" of sorts was in Parkersburg, WV, where Jefferson shelled the fuck out of Blennerhasset Island (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blennerhassett_Island).  So Theodosia's all over the place in the museums.  (The Blennerhassett's themselves had a horrible life after the whole Burr thing -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harman_Blennerhassett).

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 12, 2008, 03:28:41 PM
The Mary Celeste of the Pacific...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Joyita#The_incident_at_sea
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 12, 2008, 03:39:54 PM
Funny rocks...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Winnipesaukee_mystery_stone
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 12, 2008, 03:52:47 PM
Yes, I'm bored.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beale_ciphers

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Cassander on August 13, 2008, 09:41:38 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soviet_space_program_conspiracy_accusations

Spooky!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Disco Dust on August 14, 2008, 09:34:35 AM
Are any of y'all familiar with the ''Tunguska Event"?
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Matt on August 14, 2008, 09:52:41 AM
Of course... the why, not so much.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 14, 2008, 09:54:24 AM

Of course... the why, not so much.

If we knew why, it wouldn't be a mystery!  UFO?  Meteor?  Singularity?  Hellboy?

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Cassander on August 14, 2008, 10:40:28 PM
Tesla?
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 14, 2008, 10:42:43 PM
He was in New York doing equally insane things at the time.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Disco Dust on August 16, 2008, 11:00:42 PM
Apparently whatever happened in Russia in 1908 has scientific explanations...
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Cassander on August 18, 2008, 08:41:16 PM
actually, i just picked up a national geographic at the airport yesterday, and it had a long article about asteroids/meteors/comets that are scheduled to come really close to hitting our planet, and they had a little sidebar page about Tunguska.  apparently some scientist has proven that it was a comet that came in so fast through the atmosphere that it exploded above the surface, heat blasting everything. 
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 12:57:13 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyatlov_pass_accident

Quote
The mysterious circumstances of the hikers' deaths have inspired much speculation. Investigations of the deaths suggest that the hikers tore open their tent from within, departing barefoot in heavy snow; while the corpses show no signs of struggle, one victim had a fractured skull, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[1] The victims' clothing contained high levels of radiation.[1] Soviet investigators determined only that "a compelling unknown force" had caused the deaths, barring entry to the area for years thereafter.[1] The causes of the accident remain unclear.[2][3]
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 01:02:55 PM
Heh...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelly-Hopkinsville_encounter

Quote
Multiple eyewitnesses would claim that, for several hours stretching over a late evening and early morning, they repeatedly saw five glowing, silvery creatures, each three feet tall and seeming to float above the ground. The witnesses additionally claimed to have used firearms to shoot at the creatures, with little or no effect.

Jerome Clark writes that "nvestigations by police, Air Force officers, and civilian ufologists found no evidence of a hoax. Even Blue Book confessed to being stumped. So was [Isabel] Davis, one of the most hardheaded of UFO investigators."[2] It should be noted, however, that Project Blue Book never formally investigated the case.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 01:09:15 PM
Ah...the "Wow" signal:

http://www.planetary.org/news/2001/0117_The_Wow_Signal_Still_Eludes.html

Quote
Whatever happened to the "Wow!" signal, the most promising transmission from space ever detected by SETI? Ever since it was recorded almost a quarter of a century ago, SETI enthusiasts have speculated about its origin and wondered whether it could be a beacon from an alien civilization. The latest attempt to relocate the signal, reported in the January 10 issue of the Astrophysical Journal, was led by longtime SETI researcher Robert Gray with funding from The Planetary Society. But although Gray and his team used the entire Very Large Array in New Mexico, and although they detected many faint objects in the signal's general vicinity, they found no trace of an alien transmission. As of now, the "Wow" signal remains as enigmatic as ever..
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 01:53:19 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rendlesham_Forest_Incident

Quote
The Rendlesham Forest Incident is the name given to a series of reported sightings of unexplained lights and the alleged landing of an extraterrestrial spacecraft in Rendlesham Forest, Suffolk, England in late December 1980. It is perhaps the most famous UFO event to have happened in Britain, ranking amongst the best-known UFO events worldwide. It has been compared to the Roswell UFO incident in the United States and is commonly referred to as "Britain's Roswell" or the "English Roswell".

The tape is linked at Wikipedia.  Here's a transcript:

http://www.ianridpath.com/ufo/halttape.htm
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 01:59:59 PM
From SA --

Quote
the best number station in my opinion is the one thats in the middle of bumfuck russia that did nothing but broadcast a series of 3 tones for 27 years, then, in the middle of the night, the routine was interupted by a voice saying something in russian, twice.

then it went back to broadcasting the tones.

some guy actually managed to record it, ill try to post the link if i can remember the name of the station, its the scariest fucking thing ever if you really think about it.

edit: heres a page on it, its called ubv-76 and it has a recording, i dont know if its the recording of the guy interupting it but you get the jist of how creepy it would be.

http://www.freewebs.com/meterbands/numberstations2.html

edit 2: found the recording

http://www.geocities.com/uvb76/buzzer-message-091202.mp3

Hoping I'll find a translation...
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 02:06:39 PM
"Bloop" and "Slow Down"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloop

Quote
The Bloop is the name given to an ultra-low frequency underwater sound detected by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration several times during the summer of 1997. The source of the sound remains unknown.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slow_Down_(unidentified_sound)

Quote
Slow Down was a sound recorded on May 19, 1997, in the Equatorial Pacific ocean by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The source of the sound remains unknown.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 02:11:48 PM
One for RC:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tara_Calico

Here's the first photo:

http://www.greatsociety.org/uploads/userfiles/3/calico.jpg
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 02:44:45 PM
From SA --

Quote
the best number station in my opinion is the one thats in the middle of bumfuck russia that did nothing but broadcast a series of 3 tones for 27 years, then, in the middle of the night, the routine was interupted by a voice saying something in russian, twice.

then it went back to broadcasting the tones.

some guy actually managed to record it, ill try to post the link if i can remember the name of the station, its the scariest fucking thing ever if you really think about it.

edit: heres a page on it, its called ubv-76 and it has a recording, i dont know if its the recording of the guy interupting it but you get the jist of how creepy it would be.

http://www.freewebs.com/meterbands/numberstations2.html

edit 2: found the recording

http://www.geocities.com/uvb76/buzzer-message-091202.mp3

Hoping I'll find a translation...



Quote
I tried to translate, but it's super garbled. Here is my best attempt:

<beginning is super garbled. part of it sounds like "seventy-six". a short part is repeated twice. i think the message is something like "this is site one hundred and seventy six".>

<more garbled stuff>

<something ending in "two">

thirty-six (or 33?), ninety-three, eighty-two

<garbled>

six, two, six, nine, one

<garbled>

<something like "... of the code">

<some names?>

tatiana

three, six, nine, three, eight, two, seven (or 8?), zero

<long pause>

<then the message is apparently repeated, starting with the "seventy six" thing>

seven hundred two (or 602?), six hundred ninety one

<garbled>

thirty six, ninety three, eighty two, <two digit number ending in 0>

<garbled>

six, two, six, nine, one

<garbled>

tatiana

<garbled>

three, six, nine, three, eight, two, <8 or 7>, zero
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Nubbins on September 10, 2008, 02:52:23 PM
Ok, that photograph is seriously fucking creepy.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 03:02:25 PM
I want to see the other two!  The police aren't sharing them for some reason... They're probably horrible.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 03:10:28 PM
More scary photos:

"The boy in the picture"
http://theshadowlands.net/storypic.htm



"The Faces of Belmez"
http://everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=1758061&lastnode_id=124
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faces_of_belmez

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 03:13:33 PM
This is one that McGraw and Fajwat can waste their day on...

http://www.maydaymystery.org/mayday/

From Wikipedia:

Quote
The May Day Mystery refers to a series of cryptic ads which have been placed in the Arizona Daily Wildcat, the newspaper of the University of Arizona, every May 1 since 1981. (In 1983, 1988, 1999 and 2005 the ads technically ran on April 29, April 27, April 29 and April 29, respectively. May 1 fell on a weekend in those years, when the Daily Wildcat does not publish.) The ads have appeared on other dates as well, usually in early December. While the ads at first appear to be an intellectual game, there is an underlying message of political and economic revolution.

The first ad contained three handwritten lines: "SR/CL: RICHMOND", a string of Simplified Chinese characters, and "MAY DAY, 1981". The Chinese characters translate literally as "Chairman Mao ten-thousand years old", which is usually interpreted as "Long live Chairman Mao". [1]

There are a number of recurring themes in the ads, including:

* The Orphanage: A secret society, supposedly behind the ads
* The Prize: An unspecified reward for anyone who "solves" the mystery; in a safe deposit box
* Smiley Guy: A stylized smiley face that appears in some of the ads
* SR/CL: An unknown acronym
* White Rabbit/Wonder Bread: Unknown commodities transported by the Orphanage
* Martin Luther

Bryan Hance, a former student, discovered the ads as an undergraduate and is the first person known to seriously investigate them. He started a website in 1997 to document his investigation, and has attracted a small group of followers. He has been in contact with "The Orphanage" and others (such as "the Pimp") by email, post and phone since 1999. He has received many packages in the mail containing everything from coins and photographs to printouts from websites. He has also received many gold coins and bills, totaling over a few hundred dollars. He has been told that the money can be spent any way he wants, though Bryan tends to use it on paying the server bill.

The ads are placed by Robert Truman Hungerford, an eccentric lawyer who claims to be the legal counsel for the organization. While he refuses to discuss the origin of the ads, he has said that it is possible that he is insane and that the ads are "the ravings of a madman".

The meanings of most of the Mayday Mystery ads are unsolved.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 03:53:31 PM
An oldie but a goodie -- what's under the Sphinx?

http://www.catchpenny.org/chamber.html
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Nubbins on September 11, 2008, 09:18:06 PM
So, this isn't mystery really, but it is historical... and this was the first "history" thread that popped up in the search.

Anyway, I've been reading about Nicolai Ceausescu because there was a Jeopardy question about him tonight.

Quote
On December 21, the mass meeting, held in what is now Revolution Square, degenerated into chaos. The image of Ceauşescu's uncomprehending expression as the crowd began to boo him remains one of the defining moments of the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe. The stunned couple (the dictator had been joined by his wife), failing to control the crowds, finally took cover inside the building, where they remained until the next day. The rest of the day saw a revolt of the Bucharest population, which had assembled in University Square and confronted the police and the army on barricades. These initial events are regarded to this day as the genuine revolution. However, the unarmed rioters were no match for the military apparatus concentrated in Bucharest, which cleared the streets by midnight and arrested hundreds of people in the process.

Now, the entire Wiki on him is pretty damn interesting, but the video is absolutely priceless.  The first time I watched it, it was gut wrenching seeing the guy realize that he's completely and totally fucked.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEZHZHNByCs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceaucescu
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 11, 2008, 09:26:06 PM
His legacy in Romania is amazing.  Packs of wild dogs roam the streets of city and town, and chase the trains, all thanks to his rural clearances.  Building projects -- from apartment blocks to follys -- are all still half complete.  He owned about an eighth of the country -- villas, country homes, castles -- and they're all sealed off and guarded while the government tries to figure out what to do with them.  They still paint the trees white across the country (his wife thought it was pretty, but it was also a way for people to navigate at night as he didn't believe in streetlights).  The whole country is damaged and insane... A must visit before they completely clean it up.  I loved it...would love to go back.

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 11, 2008, 09:39:29 PM
Jesus...and that Youtube link led me to the video of his execution.  From his final rants to quietly packing him away in the cheap coffin.  All that was aired prime time, too.  Family viewing!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Cassander on September 11, 2008, 10:03:28 PM
one day in America....one day.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Nubbins on September 11, 2008, 11:23:26 PM
Yeah man, totally nuts.  His government could actually TAX up to 25% of a person's income if they had no children!  Rutting was a state sanctioned activity!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Reginald McGraw on September 12, 2008, 10:48:55 AM
Yeah man, totally nuts.  His government could actually TAX up to 25% of a person's income if they had no children!  Rutting was a state sanctioned activity!

25%!?!?  That's INSANE!!  How could you live with that level of taxation!  Oh...wait.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Nubbins on September 12, 2008, 10:51:26 AM
hahaaa :D
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on September 14, 2008, 06:59:10 AM
http://www.greatsociety.org/uploads/userfiles/3/calico.jpg

She is hot to trot.

I love the quotation, "her mother believed the girl in the photo was indeed her daughter due in part to what appeared to be a scar on the girl's leg similar to one Tara received in a car accident. However, the FBI was unable to conclusively prove that it was Tara in the photograph."

Surely her mother would know what her daughter looks like, with or without duct tape over her mouth and cum on her skirt?
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on September 14, 2008, 07:03:03 AM
http://www.greatsociety.org/uploads/userfiles/3/calico.jpg

She is hot to trot.

I love the quotation, "her mother believed the girl in the photo was indeed her daughter due in part to what appeared to be a scar on the girl's leg similar to one Tara received in a car accident. However, the FBI was unable to conclusively prove that it was Tara in the photograph."

Surely her mother would know what her daughter looks like, with or without duct tape over her mouth and cum on her skirt?

Also, that girl would get it.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Fza on September 17, 2008, 09:15:49 AM
The Kaz II

Quote
"The Kaz II, dubbed "the ghost yacht", is a 9.8 meter catamaran which was found drifting 88 nautical miles (160 km) off of the northern coast of Australia on April 18, 2007. The fate of its three-man crew remains unknown, and the circumstances in which they disappeared are mysterious and have been compared to that of the Mary Celeste.

According to the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, the Kaz II departed from Airlie Beach on April 15, 2007, and was heading for Townsville on the first leg of a journey that was to take it around Northern Australia to Western Australia.

The first indication that there was a problem came on the April 18, when it was spotted by a helicopter, which reported that the boat was drifting in the vicinity of the Great Barrier Reef, and that its crew were potentially in distress. On April 20 Maritime authorities caught up with the boat and boarded it. They found that the three man crew were missing in circumstances which they described as being "strange".

    "What they found was a bit strange in that everything was normal, there was just no sign of the crew" Jon Hall, Queensland's Emergency Management office.

In a statement delivered on the day of the boarding, officials with the Queensland Emergency Management office revealed that the yacht was in serviceable condition and was laid out as if the crew were still on board. Food and flatware set out on the table, a laptop computer set up and turned on, and the engine was still running. Officials also confirmed that the boat's emergency systems, including its radio and GPS were fully functional, and that it still had its full complement of life jackets. According to news sources, there was even a small boat still hoisted on the back of the boat and the anchor was up. The only signs, other than the disappearance of the crew, that were out of the ordinary, were damage to one of the boat's sails and that there was no life raft on board (it is unknown whether there ever was one onboard)."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaz_II



The Mary Celeste

Quote
The Mary Celeste was a brigantine discovered in the Atlantic Ocean unmanned and under sail heading towards the Strait of Gibraltar in 1872. The fate of the crew is the subject of much speculation; theories range from alcoholic fumes to underwater earthquakes, along with a large number of fictional accounts. The Mary Celeste is often described as the archetypal ghost ship.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Celeste


The Flying Dutchman is a cool one too, since it's about the arche type for sightings of ghost ships. Usually probably by drunken sailors but there is one eye account that is interesting;

Quote
There have been many reported sightings of the Flying Dutchman on the high seas in the 19th and 20th centuries. One of the most famous was by Prince George of Wales (later King George V of the United Kingdom). During his late adolescence, in 1880, along with his elder brother Prince Albert Victor of Wales (sons of the future King Edward VII), he was on a three-year-long voyage with their tutor Dalton aboard the 4000-tonne corvette HMS Bacchante. Off the coast of Australia, between Melbourne and Sydney, Dalton records:

"At 4 a.m. the Flying Dutchman crossed our bows. A strange red light as of a phantom ship all aglow, in the midst of which light the masts, spars, and sails of a brig 200 yards distant stood out in strong relief as she came up on the port bow, where also the officer of the watch from the bridge clearly saw her, as did the quarterdeck midshipman, who was sent forward at once to the forecastle; but on arriving there was no vestige nor any sign whatever of any material ship was to be seen either near or right away to the horizon, the night being clear and the sea calm. Thirteen persons altogether saw her...At 10.45 a.m. the ordinary seaman who had this morning reported the Flying Dutchman fell from the foretopmast crosstrees on to the topgallant forecastle and was smashed to atoms."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Dutchman
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on September 17, 2008, 09:29:20 AM
Where's the photos of tied-up girls, man?
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Nubbins on September 17, 2008, 10:43:26 AM
Ghost ships!  Pretty cool.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 17, 2008, 11:32:01 AM
I love ghost ships.  I've never heard of the Kaz II!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Matt on September 22, 2008, 11:14:17 PM
bump thread because this thread owns
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 22, 2008, 11:19:38 PM
Nice.  I'll have to add to this tomorrow.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Nubbins on September 22, 2008, 11:44:36 PM
IT'S PAST YOUR BEDTIME YOUNG MAN
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Matt on September 22, 2008, 11:48:55 PM
Claudia Black's coming to read bedtime stories....
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Nubbins on September 22, 2008, 11:52:30 PM
Nach, did you watch Heroes?
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 24, 2008, 03:36:11 PM
The Dancing Plague (http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/08/01/dancing-death-mystery-02.html)

Spring Heeled Jack (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_Heeled_Jack)

The Mad Gasser of Mattoon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mad_Gasser_of_Mattoon)

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Reginald McGraw on September 24, 2008, 04:08:34 PM
The Mad Gasser of Mattoon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mad_Gasser_of_Mattoon)

Haha!  "also known as 'The Anesthetic Prowler'"
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Nubbins on September 24, 2008, 04:21:25 PM
So it sounds like the "Mad Gasser", whatever it was, never actually killed anyone?
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Nubbins on September 25, 2008, 04:29:28 PM
The Mad Gasser of Mattoon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mad_Gasser_of_Mattoon)
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: fajwat on September 25, 2008, 07:17:49 PM
ass you pass!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Nubbins on September 26, 2008, 02:19:59 PM
The Mad Gasser of Mattoon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mad_Gasser_of_Mattoon)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26877682/
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on October 02, 2008, 01:01:14 PM
Crosspost:
http://www.greatsociety.org/forums/index.php/topic,3833.0.html

Fossett becoming more and more of a mystery...

e: new link.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Cassander on October 03, 2008, 12:19:05 AM
Fossett is a Current Events Mystery, not a History Mystery.  New thread plz!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on October 03, 2008, 08:23:28 AM
Uh...done.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on January 05, 2010, 06:55:12 PM
Oh-ho!

Quote
We all complain about flight delays, but nothing tops the one that's been waiting close to 100 years to be discovered. An Australian research team just discovered what's left of the first plane ever to fly to Antarctica. It hit the ground in 1912 ... and has been waiting ever since. The discovery wasn't an accident. The guys from the Mawson's Huts Foundation has been looking for it for the last three summers. In a sign that 2010 is going to kick ass for these folks, they found some metal pieces of the plane on New Year's Day.

According to USA Today, Tony Stewart, a member of the team, wrote on his blog, "The biggest news of the day is that we've found the air tractor, or at least parts of it!"

Early last century, Australian explorer Douglas Mawson took the helm of two expeditions to Antarctica. On the first of the two, he brought a Vickers plane with him, but the wings were damaged in a crash before the team set out for Antarctica. Thought it would never take flight, Mawson hoped to use it as a motorized sled of sorts. The engine couldn't handle the temperature extremes, though, so Mawson left it behind.


http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/discoveries/2010-01-03-antarctica-plane-found_N.htm

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/australasia/wreckage-of-1912-plane-in-antarctica-is-discovered-1855944.html

Have to run home, so don't have a chance to find his blog.  
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on February 22, 2010, 02:27:45 PM
Unsolved mysteries updates!

Tara Calico:

One for RC:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tara_Calico

Here's the first photo:

http://www.greatsociety.org/uploads/userfiles/3/calico.jpg


http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,544305,00.html?test=latestnews

----


The Latest Mayday Ad:
This is one that McGraw and Fajwat can waste their day on...

http://www.maydaymystery.org/mayday/

From Wikipedia:

Quote
The May Day Mystery refers to a series of cryptic ads which have been placed in the Arizona Daily Wildcat, the newspaper of the University of Arizona, every May 1 since 1981. (In 1983, 1988, 1999 and 2005 the ads technically ran on April 29, April 27, April 29 and April 29, respectively. May 1 fell on a weekend in those years, when the Daily Wildcat does not publish.) The ads have appeared on other dates as well, usually in early December. While the ads at first appear to be an intellectual game, there is an underlying message of political and economic revolution.

The first ad contained three handwritten lines: "SR/CL: RICHMOND", a string of Simplified Chinese characters, and "MAY DAY, 1981". The Chinese characters translate literally as "Chairman Mao ten-thousand years old", which is usually interpreted as "Long live Chairman Mao". [1]

There are a number of recurring themes in the ads, including:

* The Orphanage: A secret society, supposedly behind the ads
* The Prize: An unspecified reward for anyone who "solves" the mystery; in a safe deposit box
* Smiley Guy: A stylized smiley face that appears in some of the ads
* SR/CL: An unknown acronym
* White Rabbit/Wonder Bread: Unknown commodities transported by the Orphanage
* Martin Luther

Bryan Hance, a former student, discovered the ads as an undergraduate and is the first person known to seriously investigate them. He started a website in 1997 to document his investigation, and has attracted a small group of followers. He has been in contact with "The Orphanage" and others (such as "the Pimp") by email, post and phone since 1999. He has received many packages in the mail containing everything from coins and photographs to printouts from websites. He has also received many gold coins and bills, totaling over a few hundred dollars. He has been told that the money can be spent any way he wants, though Bryan tends to use it on paying the server bill.

The ads are placed by Robert Truman Hungerford, an eccentric lawyer who claims to be the legal counsel for the organization. While he refuses to discuss the origin of the ads, he has said that it is possible that he is insane and that the ads are "the ravings of a madman".

The meanings of most of the Mayday Mystery ads are unsolved.

http://www.maydaymystery.org/mayday/texts/09-dec9.html








Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 22, 2010, 03:21:28 PM
I had never read that Tara Calico story. Creepy.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on February 22, 2010, 03:31:51 PM
Did you miss this thread last year?  Some cool stuff on the earlier pages.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 22, 2010, 05:26:40 PM
I need to go back and check some stuff out, I think. With a lot of these news and link threads I'll be like, "Ooo, I need to read that when I have time." Then I never do.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on February 23, 2010, 03:39:46 PM
Did I miss this in the thread?  The Stardust mystery.  Though, as of 2000, it's no longer a mystery.  Maybe why I left it out.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Dust_%28aircraft%29

I'm a fan of the STENDEC part of the mystery (still unanswered):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Dust_%28aircraft%29#.22STENDEC.22

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/vanished/stendec.html
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Cassander on February 26, 2010, 11:24:27 AM
Quote
On June 15, 1989, a Polaroid photo of an unidentified young girl and boy, both bound and gagged, was found in the parking lot of a convenience store in Port St. Joe, Florida. It was theorized that the girl in the photo was Tara and that the boy was Michael Henley, also of New Mexico, who had disappeared in April 1988. According to investigators the picture had to have been taken after May 1989 because the particular film used in the photograph was not available until then.  Her mother believed the girl in the photo was indeed her daughter due in part to what appeared to be a scar on the girl's leg similar to one Tara received in a car accident. However, the FBI was unable to conclusively prove that it was Tara in the photograph.

Um...the girl was nineteen and the photo was taken only about 8 months after her disappearance.  How do you NOT positively or negatively ID the picture?
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on February 26, 2010, 11:33:58 AM
Yeah, I don't get that part of the story.  That's the trouble with some of this shit.  It was her daughter!  Or was it!??!?! *commercial break*

Anyway, I've got "Lost City of Z" on my Amazon Wishlist, and the more I read about it the more I really want to get it in me.  So, a new one for this thread:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percy_Fawcett

Quote
Along with his son, Fawcett disappeared under unknown circumstances in 1925 during an expedition to find what he believed to be an ancient lost city in the uncharted jungles of Brazil. Just such a city has indeed recently been found at the latitude,longitude coordinates

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lost_City_of_Z_%28book%29

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/science/earth-environment/article6982391.ece

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2004/mar/21/research.brazil
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on February 27, 2010, 03:42:53 AM
That's an awesome story.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on March 25, 2010, 06:15:38 PM
Nothing new... And nothing really mysterious.  I just realized that the Nazi mysticism shit wasn't really represented in this thread... Though I could swear I posted something about the Antarctica expedition... Anyway, the full catalog of all the goofy shit the Nazi's did (much overblown by modern fiction):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahnenerbe

And the fruitier stuff (as well as a Wikipedia-style "discussion" on Nazi mysticism), is at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazi_mysticism

Then you can click through to other articles for three hours.

Mainly, all they did was traipse around the wilderness trying to prove that everybody who mattered in history was somehow Aryan.  Oh, and to seal Jews in tanks of freezing water to see what would happen to them after three hours.

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on April 01, 2010, 06:18:22 PM
Oh-ho!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taman_Shud_Case

Quote
The Taman Shud Case,[1]  also known as the "Mystery of the Somerton Man", is an unsolved case revolving around an unidentified man found dead at 6.30am, December 1, 1948 on Somerton beach in Adelaide, Australia.

Considered "one of Australia's most profound mysteries",[2] the case has been the subject of intense speculation over the years regarding the identity of the victim, the events leading up to his death and the cause of death.

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on April 01, 2010, 06:31:37 PM
And the mystery of the last two U-Boats which, clearly, had been up to something.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_submarine_U-977

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_submarine_U-530

U-530 sounds more like they just went rogue after a mutiny.

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on May 25, 2010, 11:57:16 AM
This is fun:

http://weburbanist.com/2010/05/24/undead-languages-10-mysterious-undeciphered-scripts/

10 mystery languages.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on May 25, 2010, 04:57:09 PM
Sex!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on June 01, 2010, 02:00:16 PM
This is fun:

http://weburbanist.com/2010/05/24/undead-languages-10-mysterious-undeciphered-scripts/

10 mystery languages.

And a follow-up!

http://weburbanist.com/2010/05/31/cryptic-codes-11-legendary-uncracked-ciphers/
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 28, 2010, 11:35:39 PM
A claim that they found Earhart:

http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/south-pacific/4070865/Claims-Amelia-Earharts-plane-found

They found a Lockheed Electra buried in coral.

There's lots of folks who say this is crap, but it backs up a theory by an archeologist in 07 that she went down at roughly the spot where they claim to have found the plane.

We'll find out for sure in a few weeks.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on December 20, 2010, 05:34:35 PM
A possible RC script...

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38719231/ns/business-huguette_clark_mystery/


Quote
Huguette Clark was already a mystery. Now there are new glimpses into the life of the reclusive heiress.

The daughter of a disgraced former U.S. senator, Huguette inherited millions from the Montana copper mines, and has lived a solitary life while her three fabulous homes sit empty: a $100 million estate on the Pacific Coast in Santa Barbara, a $24 million country house in Connecticut and a $100 million co-op, the largest apartment on Fifth Avenue overlooking Central Park — all immaculately kept but unoccupied for decades.

As Huguette has just marked her 104th birthday in an ordinary hospital room in New York, there are unanswered questions as well:

Who protects an old lady who secluded herself from the world, limiting her life to a single room, playing dress-up with her dolls and watching cartoons? Who protects an old lady whose Stradivarius violin, the famous one called "The Virgin," which her mother gave her as a 50th birthday present, has been sold secretly for $6 million? Who protects an old lady whose dearest friend, a social secretary to whom Huguette supposedly gave $10 million, now has Alzheimer's and is unable to visit anymore? Who protects an old lady who has no children, and whose distant relatives have been prevented from visiting her? Who protects an old lady whose accountant fell behind on his own federal income taxes and is a convicted felon and a registered sex offender?

Interest in Huguette Clark was sparked in February by msnbc.com's photo narrative, "The Clarks: An American story of wealth, scandal and mystery." (on this page) The story was one of the most popular ever on msnbc.com. Yahoo! Buzz named Huguette Clark a hot topic of Web searches. “The TODAY Show” followed up with a report and newly discovered photos of Huguette. The New York Daily News breathlessly declared, based on the Today report, "Reclusive 104-year-old heiress Huguette Clark enters hospital," which is true enough, though that event happened at least two decades ago. The tabloid also compared her to Paris Hilton, which will be an apt comparison if Miss Hilton doesn't have her photograph taken in the next 80 years.

Much much more at the link... A fascinating story.

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Cassander on February 20, 2011, 03:36:20 PM
So...where are all the Fu-Go?  Not really a mystery, but this seemed like the appropriate thread.

Quote
A fire balloon, balloon bomb (Japanese: 風船爆弾 fūsen bakudan, literally "balloon bomb"), or Fu-Go was an experimental weapon launched by Japan during World War II. A hydrogen balloon with a load varying from a 12-kilogram (26 lb) incendiary to one 15 kg (33 lb) antipersonnel bomb and four 5 kg (11 lb) incendiary devices attached, they were designed as a cheap weapon intended to make use of the jet stream over the Pacific Ocean and wreak havoc on Canadian and American cities, forests, and farmland.
The balloons were relatively ineffective as weapons but were used in one of the few attacks on North America during World War II.
Between November 1944 and April 1945, Japan launched over 9,300 fire balloons. About 300 balloon bombs were found or observed in North America, killing six people and causing a small amount of damage.[1]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugo
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on March 09, 2011, 10:38:58 AM
I got caught up in the history of frozen mammoths... There were so many of them in Siberia that the Russians would pack fewer food supplies for their sled dogs in the 1700's.

These mammoths in Siberia were flash frozen so quickly -- and we're talking herds -- that the food in their stomachs was undigested. And, catch this:

Quote
In 1797 the body of a mammoth, with flesh skin, and hair was found in northeastern Siberia, and since then bodies of other mammoths have been unearthed from the frozen ground throughout that region. The flesh had the appearance of freshly frozen beef; it was edible, and wolves and sledge dogs fed on it without harm. [D.F.Hertz in B Digby: The Mammoth (1926), p.9.]

Holy. Fuck.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Reginald McGraw on March 09, 2011, 09:55:35 PM
I would love to try mammoth meat.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on March 10, 2011, 02:05:53 PM
I bet it would taste like elephant.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Reginald McGraw on March 10, 2011, 08:29:58 PM
I would love to taste elephant meat too!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on April 05, 2011, 03:59:18 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyatlov_pass_accident

Quote
The mysterious circumstances of the hikers' deaths have inspired much speculation. Investigations of the deaths suggest that the hikers tore open their tent from within, departing barefoot in heavy snow; while the corpses show no signs of struggle, one victim had a fractured skull, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[1] The victims' clothing contained high levels of radiation.[1] Soviet investigators determined only that "a compelling unknown force" had caused the deaths, barring entry to the area for years thereafter.[1] The causes of the accident remain unclear.[2][3]

Movie time!

http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/2011/04/dyatlov-pass-incident-film-production.html

That's my paranormal paranoia go-to site, but they usually do a good job with stuff like this. In between the OMG it's Alien Bigfoot Vampires!! you end up with a very exhaustive history -- and usually some multimedia -- of their topic of the day. This one has some great stuff on the Dyatlov Pass mystery.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Cassander on April 06, 2011, 12:13:18 AM
And the first external link is to skeptoid with a plausible "they tried to escape an avalanche" explanation. 
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on April 06, 2011, 10:43:06 AM
And the first external link is to skeptoid with a plausible "they tried to escape an avalanche" explanation. 

Boring! I think it was soldiers from Atlantis. I mean, obviously. Right?
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 06, 2011, 12:34:25 PM
You're sure that site isn't some kind fo guerrilla marketing for 'The Thing' prequel?

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on April 06, 2011, 01:42:50 PM
The site is much easier to approach if you put it in Google Reader, which strips out everything but the story.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 21, 2011, 07:56:52 PM
I've procrastinated writing all day by reading about the Lindbergh baby kidnapping. Bruno Hauptmann was executed for it, but it's unlikely he acted alone.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindbergh_kidnapping
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on June 22, 2011, 12:06:35 AM
Oh-ho! The Lindbergh case. A NM script if ever I saw one.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 22, 2011, 12:52:43 AM
My script would be called "Cemetery John."
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 24, 2011, 05:28:09 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyatlov_pass_accident

Quote
The mysterious circumstances of the hikers' deaths have inspired much speculation. Investigations of the deaths suggest that the hikers tore open their tent from within, departing barefoot in heavy snow; while the corpses show no signs of struggle, one victim had a fractured skull, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[1] The victims' clothing contained high levels of radiation.[1] Soviet investigators determined only that "a compelling unknown force" had caused the deaths, barring entry to the area for years thereafter.[1] The causes of the accident remain unclear.[2][3]

Movie time!

http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/2011/04/dyatlov-pass-incident-film-production.html

That's my paranormal paranoia go-to site, but they usually do a good job with stuff like this. In between the OMG it's Alien Bigfoot Vampires!! you end up with a very exhaustive history -- and usually some multimedia -- of their topic of the day. This one has some great stuff on the Dyatlov Pass mystery.

I've been obsessed with this story all week.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on June 24, 2011, 05:36:44 PM
Time to steal it and put a script together before they finish.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 24, 2011, 05:43:22 PM
I'm actually curious to see the movie. The chick with her tongue cut off is the creepiest part to me. Though maybe she just bit it off in a panic.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on June 24, 2011, 05:54:21 PM
My biggest obsession from this thread is anything to do with ghost ships:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ghost_ships#Historically_attested

Especially the ones that, you know, are still out there: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baychimo

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Cassander on June 26, 2011, 09:30:43 PM
Not really a mystery, but a chilling anecdote from 1920's American history that I've never heard of

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bath_School_disaster

Basically a man blew up a school in 1927 because he thought the taxes levied on him to build the school led to his farm's financial ruin.  So he goes on a calculated rampage.  Creepy.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on June 27, 2011, 11:10:17 AM
Yeah, the mass murder of innocents always makes me feel better when I'm overcharged for something.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 01, 2011, 08:46:53 AM
!!!

Quote
FBI: 'Credible lead' surfaces in D.B. Cooper case

SEATTLE (AP) — The FBI says it has a "credible" lead in the D.B. Cooper case involving the 1971 hijacking of a passenger jet over Washington state and the suspect's legendary parachute escape.

The fate and identity of the hijacker dubbed "D.B. Cooper" has remained a mystery in the 40 years since a man jumped from a Northwest Orient Airlines 727 flight with $200,000 in ransom.

The recent tip provided to the FBI came from a law enforcement member who directed investigators to a person who might have helpful information on the suspect, FBI spokeswoman Ayn Sandalo Dietrich told The Seattle Times on Sunday. She called the new information the "most promising lead we have right now," but cautioned that investigators were not on the verge of breaking the case.

"With any lead our first step is to assess how credible it is," Sandalo Dietrich told the Seattle Post Intelligencer on Saturday. "Having this come through another law enforcement (agency), having looked it over when we got it - it seems pretty interesting."

Dietrich says an item belonging to the man was sent to a lab in Quantico, Va., for forensic testing. She did not provide specifics about the item or the man's identity.

Federal investigators have checked more than 1,000 leads since the suspect bailed out on Nov. 24, 1971, over the Pacific Northwest. The man who jumped gave his name as Dan Cooper and claimed shortly after takeoff in Portland, Ore., that he had a bomb, leading the flight crew to land the plane in Seattle, where passengers were exchanged for parachutes and ransom money.

The flight then took off for Mexico with the suspect and flight crew on board before the man parachuted from the plane.

The FBI's recent tip in the case was first reported by The Telegraph newspaper in London.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 01, 2011, 10:55:25 AM
There's a "lead" every few years. I'll believe it when they actually make headway... But we're talking about a case with no physical evidence.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 04, 2011, 10:48:20 AM
The follow-up:

Quote
My uncle was D.B. Cooper, Oklahoma woman claims

(CNN) -- It's an extraordinary claim -- one based on a 40-year-old memory -- but one the FBI has been using in an attempt to untangle the unsolved case of skyjacker D.B. Cooper.

To Marla Cooper of Oklahoma, her uncle was D.B. Cooper -- except she knew him as Uncle L.D. She believes he died in 1999.

"I saw my uncle plotting a scheme," Cooper told CNN's Brooke Baldwin of what she said she remembers witnessing as an eight-year-old girl four decades ago.

Cooper said she was with two uncles at her grandmother's house around Thanksgiving time.

"I was with them while they were plotting it. I didn't really know what was going on," Cooper said. "Afterwards on Thanksgiving Day, I saw them return and I heard them discussing what they had done with my father. I have very vivid memories of it."

Her claim might be cause for healthy speculation, especially 40 years after the fact, but two sources close to the investigation have told CNN that Marla Cooper's tip led to the FBI reviving the case and for the past year the agency has been actively working the lead.

On November 24, 1971, a man calling himself Dan Cooper -- the "D.B." apparently was a myth created by the press, according to the FBI -- hijacked Northwest Orient Flight 305 and succeeded in getting authorities to give him $200,000 and parachutes in return for letting passengers off the plane.

The man then asked to be flown to Mexico City but jumped out of the back of the plane somewhere between Seattle, Washington, and Reno, Nevada. Authorities have never been able to prove whether the man survived or what his actual identity was.

FBI working new lead in D.B. Cooper hijacking case

Marla Cooper says he did survive, but maybe, just barely.

"He and my other uncle came back very early on Thanksgiving morning and my Uncle L.D. was wounded," she said. "He had blood on his shirt. He was banged up. He was really in bad shape."

She said the Korean War veteran later received treatment for his injuries at a VA hospital.

It was then Cooper's father swore her to secrecy, she said.

"He explained that what my uncles had done could mean death and he said, 'Marla, you can never speak of this,'" according to Cooper, who said she last saw L.D. Cooper around Christmas 1972.

"He just vanished from the life that he had known before," she said, noting that her uncle missed her grandmother's funeral around 1975.

The FBI hasn't directly commented on Marla Cooper's claims, but a spokesman for the agency did say this week that the tip the agency is investigating came to them through a retired law enforcement officer, who had a contact who thought he or she knew the skyjacker's identity but added the suspect was dead.

Marla Cooper said she gave the FBI a guitar strap her uncle had given her mother. She said they couldn't find any of his fingerprints on it.

"Family members of the deceased have cooperated with us and given us access to items which belonged to the deceased," said Fred Gutt with the FBI's Seattle Field Office. The FBI's lab started looking for evidence that might prove the dead person was the man who skyjacked Flight 305. The FBI wanted to retrieve items with fingerprints belonging to the new suspect.

Gutt said the FBI knows Cooper had handled certain papers, including his plane ticket, and touched plane seats, but many fingerprints were found on those items. Through the years, the FBI managed to identify some fingerprints but not all of them.

Gutt would not discuss the suspect's identity, the evidence retrieved or what the lab results were. But, Gutt said, "so far there's not a lot that's inconsistent" with the suspect matching D.B. Cooper.

Gutt added the FBI has not been able to prove the person is the mysterious skyjacker and the law enforcement agency still does not know for certain whether Cooper survived his leap out of the plane almost four decades ago during bad weather.

Although the FBI has been looking into the new lead for a year, it was first revealed during an interview with The Telegraph of London in advance of the 40th anniversary of the unsolved case this November.

One clue came in 1980, when a young boy found a rotting package full of $20 bills -- $5,800 in all -- that matched the serial numbers of the ransom money. The FBI returned most of the bills to the boy, named Brian Ingram, and Ingram has since auctioned some of them, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reported.

"We've run down thousands of leads and considered all sorts of scenarios," the FBI said in 2007. "And amateur sleuths have put forward plenty of their own theories. Yet the case remains unsolved. Would we still like to get our man? Absolutely."

The FBI appealed for help from the public, releasing pictures of Cooper's black J.C. Penney tie, which he removed before jumping and which later provided authorities with a DNA sample, along with some of the found money.

The agency reminded the public that Cooper was no expert skydiver.

"We originally thought Cooper was an experienced jumper, perhaps even a paratrooper," said Special Agent Larry Carr in 2007. "We concluded after a few years this was simply not true. No experienced parachutist would have jumped in the pitch-black night, in the rain, with a 200-mile-an-hour wind in his face, wearing loafers and a trench coat. It was simply too risky. He also missed that his reserve chute was only for training and had been sewn shut -- something a skilled skydiver would have checked."

Agents also believe Cooper had no help on the ground. If he had had an accomplice, he would have needed to coordinate closely with the flight crew and jump at just the right moment.

"But Cooper simply said, 'Fly to Mexico,' and he had no idea where he was when he jumped," authorities said. "There was also no visibility of the ground due to cloud cover at 5,000 feet."

Two flight attendants who were in contact with Cooper gave nearly identical descriptions of him, as did those who encountered him on the ground. He was said to be between 5 foot 10 and 6 feet tall, weighing 170 to 180 pounds with brown eyes.

Carr said in 2007 he believed it was unlikely Cooper survived the jump. "Diving into the wilderness without a plan, without the right equipment, in such terrible conditions, he probably never even got his chute open," he said.

By the five-year anniversary of the hijacking, the FBI said it had considered more than 800 suspects and eliminated all but two dozen from consideration.

Several high-profile suspects have been ruled out over the years.

Duane Weber, who claimed on his deathbed to be Cooper, was eliminated by DNA testing, the FBI said.

Another man, Kenneth Christiansen, did not match the physical description and was a skilled paratrooper.

A third, Richard McCoy, who died in 1974, also did not match the description and was at home the day after the hijacking having Thanksgiving dinner with his family in Utah -- "an unlikely scenario unless he had help," the agency said.

Gutt said while the FBI understands there is great public interest in this long-unsolved case "it's a fairly low-priority case for the FBI" as it pursues new investigations involving cases like missing children that have a current impact on public safety.

Even so, Gutt said the FBI always follows up on any new tips on the case.

On Sunday, another FBI spokeswoman, Ayn Sandalo Dietrich, told CNN the information on the new suspect is not expected to be "a big break in the investigation."

CNN's Brooke Baldwin, Patrick Oppmann, Carol Cratty and Stephanie Gallman contributed to this report

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 04, 2011, 12:09:08 PM
Shit gets into the ether and people go INSANE.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 04, 2011, 12:36:35 PM
We still need to discuss my Cooper script idea which will never amount to anything because I can't write scripts and you hate me.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 04, 2011, 12:51:02 PM
I'll steal it, I mean, help you with it.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 04, 2011, 12:56:49 PM
Yay! I have lots of stuff you can steal. Then you can leave me to die on a barstool in Socorro, NM.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 15, 2011, 03:26:39 PM
Not a mystery exactly, but I didn't know where else to put this.

Quote
Old text, new wrinkles: Did Butch Cassidy survive?

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Did Butch Cassidy, the notorious Old West outlaw who most historians believe perished in a 1908 shootout in Bolivia, actually survive that battle and live to old age, peacefully and anonymously, in Washington state? And did he pen an autobiography detailing his exploits while cleverly casting the book as biography under another name?

A rare books collector says he has obtained a manuscript with new evidence that may give credence to that theory. The 200-page manuscript, "Bandit Invincible: The Story of Butch Cassidy," which dates to 1934, is twice as long as a previously known but unpublished novella of the same title by William T. Phillips, a machinist who died in Spokane in 1937.

Utah book collector Brent Ashworth and Montana author Larry Pointer say the text contains the best evidence yet — with details only Cassidy could have known — that "Bandit Invincible" was not biography but autobiography, and that Phillips himself was the legendary outlaw.

Others aren't convinced.

"Total horse pucky," said Cassidy historian Dan Buck. "It doesn't bear a great deal of relationship to Butch Cassidy's real life, or Butch Cassidy's life as we know it."

Historians more or less agree that Cassidy was born Robert LeRoy Parker in 1866 in Beaver, Utah, the oldest of 13 children in a Mormon family. He robbed his first bank in 1889 in Telluride, Colorado, and fell in with cattle rustlers who hid out at The Hole in the Wall, a refuge in northern Wyoming's Johnson County. He left the area before cattle barons hunted down cattle-rustling homesteaders in the 1892 Johnson County War.

Cassidy then served a year and a half in Wyoming Territorial Prison in Laramie for possessing three stolen horses. But for most of the next 20 years, his Wild Bunch gang held up banks and trains across the West and in South America.

"Bandit Invincible's" author claims to have known Cassidy since boyhood and never met "a more courageous and kinder hearted man."

He acknowledges changing people and place names. But some descriptions fit details of Cassidy's life too neatly to have come from anyone else, said Ashworth, owner of B. Ashworth's Rare Books and Collectibles in Provo.

They include a judge's meeting with Cassidy in prison in February 1895. The judge offered to "let bygones be bygones" and to seek a Cassidy pardon from the governor. Cassidy refused to shake the judge's hand.

"I must tell you now that I will even my account with you, if it is the last act I ever do," Cassidy is quoted as saying by Philips.

Wyoming's state archives contain an 1895 letter by the judge who sentenced Cassidy. The letter relates how Cassidy seemed to harbor "ill-will" and didn't accept the "friendly advances" of another judge, Jay Torrey, who had visited Cassidy in prison.

Cassidy had sued Torrey's ranch two years earlier for taking eight of his cattle, Pointer said.

"What's really remarkable to me is that, who else cares?" Pointer said. "Who else would have remembered it in that kind of detail...about an offer of a handshake and refusing it in a prison in Wyoming in 1895?"

Gov. William Richards pardoned Cassidy in 1896.

"Bandit Invincible" also describes how Ed Seeley, a rustler and prospector, told Cassidy's gang how to find a remote hideout in northern Wyoming's Bighorn Canyon. Pointer, who authored "In Search of Butch Cassidy," said he believes the Wild Bunch hid there more than at Hole in the Wall, which had become known to authorities.

"It had been used by (Seeley) one summer when he had been badly wanted by the sheriff's forces along in ninety-one. Unless one had a guide who knew the entire country, it was impossible to find the place," the manuscript says of the canyon hideout .

Records show that a rustler named Edward H. Seeley was imprisoned at Wyoming Territorial Prison while Cassidy was there, Pointer said.

"That's just really exciting to me because this is really ephemeral stuff," he said. "No one who had not been there or done that would know that."

Nobody except for some cowboy who rode the range in the late 1800s, knew Cassidy's friends and maybe even knew the outlaw himself, Buck suggested.

"There's a sort of commonsense reason why Phillips would have got some stuff right," Buck said. "They knew each other."

In 1991, Buck and his wife, Anne Meadows, helped dig up a grave in San Vicente, Bolivia, said to contain the remains of Butch and his sidekick, Harry Longabaugh — the Sundance Kid. DNA testing revealed the bones weren't the outlaws, but Buck, a writer who lives in Washington, D.C., said his research shows the two more than likely died in a shootout with Bolivian cavalry in 1908.

Stories abound of Sundance living long after his time in South America. But they're outnumbered by purported Cassidy sightings. A brother and sister of Cassidy's insisted he visited them at a family ranch near Circleville, Utah, in 1925.

"The majority of those who were there believed that, believed it was him that came back," said Bill Betenson, who recalled that his great-grandmother, Lula Parker Betenson, used to talk about the visit by a man she identified as her brother, Cassidy.

The manuscript has an ending fit for Hollywood. Cornered by the Bolivian cavalry while holding up a pack train, Butch and Sundance make a stand. Sundance is killed. Butch escapes to Europe, has plastic surgery in Paris, and schemes to return to the U.S. and reunite with an old girlfriend from Wyoming.

Most of the manuscript's accounts bear little resemblance to known Wild Bunch exploits. Pointer insists that Cassidy, as Phillips, was writing fiction. Phillips did offer the story to Sunset magazine without drawing interest.

The earliest documentation of Phillips is his marriage to Gertrude Livesay in Adrian, Michigan, in 1908, three months after Cassidy's last known letter from Bolivia, according to Pointer. Buck insists they married several months before a documented Bolivian shootout that probably was the one in which Butch and Sundance were killed.

In 1911, the couple moved to Spokane, where their closest friends said years later that Phillips let them in on a secret: He was the famous outlaw.

In the 1930s, Phillips sold his interest in the foundering Phillips Manufacturing Company. He visited central Wyoming, where more than a few people in the Lander area, including one of Cassidy's old girlfriends, said it was Cassidy who spent the summer of 1934 camping out in the Wind River Range, telling tales about the Wild Bunch and digging holes in search of buried loot.

"All of these people were bamboozled by this faker from Spokane?" Pointer asked. "These weren't hayseed, duped ignorant people. These were pillars of our community. And if they said something, you had to better take it seriously."

Phillips' adopted son, William R. Phillips, believed his stepfather was Butch Cassidy, said Pointer, who interviewed him in the 1970s. William R. Phillips has since died.

In 1938, after her husband died of cancer, Gertrude Phillips told a Cassidy researcher that she and her husband had known Cassidy but that Phillips was not him. She did so only because she "didn't want the notoriety," Pointer said William R. Phillips told him.

DNA testing is unlikely to determine that Phillips, who was cremated, was Cassidy.

The many reports of later Wyoming sightings have convinced Carol Thiesse, director of the Fremont County Pioneer Museum in Lander.

"If Phillips wasn't, he certainly knew a heck of a lot about Butch," she said.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 15, 2011, 03:38:08 PM
The movie did so much damage to the legend with that (completely fictional) finale. If you put that out of your mind and just pay attention to the facts then...yeah...there are about a thousand holes.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 01, 2011, 12:30:06 PM
I thought we had more on Ned Kelly somewhere, but I couldn't find it.

Quote
Body of infamous Aussie outlaw Ned Kelly found

The headless remains of the infamous Australian outlaw Ned Kelly have finally been identified, officials said Thursday, solving a mystery dating back more than 130 years.

Considered by some to be a cold-blooded killer, Kelly was also seen as a folk hero and symbol of Irish-Australian defiance against the British authorities.

After murdering three policemen, he was captured in Victoria state in 1880 and hanged at Old Melbourne Gaol in November of the same year. But his body went missing after it was thrown into a mass grave.

The bodies in the grave were transferred from the jail to Pentridge Prison in 1929 and then exhumed again in 2009. The investigation into Kelly began when a skull believed to be his -- and stolen in 1978 -- was rediscovered.

Doctors and scientists at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine identified his body, found in a wooden axe box, after a DNA sample was taken from Melbourne teacher Leigh Olver, Kelly's sister Ellen's great-grandson.

"The wear and tear of the skeleton is a little bit more than would be expected for a 25-year-old today," said institute director Professor Stephen Cordner.

"But such was Ned's life, this is hardly surprising."

However, tests found that the skull believed to be Kelly's was in fact not his.

Victoria's Attorney-General Robert Clark said he was amazed by the work of the forensic scientists.

"This is an extraordinary achievement by our forensic team," he said.

"To think a group of scientists could identify the body of a man who was executed more than 130 years ago, moved and buried in a haphazard fashion among 33 other prisoners, most of whom are not identified, is amazing."

Believed to have been born in 1854 or 1855, Kelly became an outlaw two years before he was hanged, taking on corrupt police and greedy land barons.

He survived a shootout with police in 1878 that saw him, his brother Dan, and friends Joe Byrne and Steve Hart slapped with an 8,000-pound bounty -- the largest reward ever offered in the British Empire -- for anyone who found them, dead or alive.

Over the next 18 months, the Kelly Gang held up country towns and robbed their banks, becoming folk heroes to the masses.

In a final gunbattle at Glenrowan, three of the gang members died and Kelly, dressed in home-made plate metal armour and helmet, was wounded and arrested.

Photos of his skeletal remains clearly show a bullet hole in one of his leg bones.

Olver, who supplied the DNA, said he was relieved to finally have some closure.

"It's such a great relief to finally have this side of the story resolved," he told reporters, adding that he hoped a suitable resting place could be found for his colourful relative.

"A place of dignity, a place very appropriate. Where that is will be determined later," he said.

Victoria Police, meanwhile, issued a statement saying that while Kelly's life was "one of Australia's most iconic cultural stories", people should remember he "murdered three police officers in the course of their duty".

The exploits of Kelly and his gang have been the subject of numerous films and television series.

Rolling Stone Mick Jagger played the lead role in the 1970 movie "Ned Kelly" while Heath Ledger starred as the bandit in a 2003 remake that also featured Orlando Bloom and Geoffrey Rush.

He has also been the inspiration for many books, most notably Peter Carey's novel "True History of the Kelly Gang", which won the 2001 Booker Prize.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 01, 2011, 12:55:23 PM
Kelly was such a loon. We need more people running around in homemade armor.

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 15, 2011, 01:32:23 PM

Quote
Visible Only From Above, Mystifying 'Nazca Lines' Discovered in Mideast

They stretch from Syria to Saudi Arabia, can be seen from the air but not the ground, and are virtually unknown to the public.

They are the Middle East's own version of the Nazca Lines — ancient "geolyphs," or drawings, that span deserts in southern Peru — and now, thanks to new satellite-mapping technologies, and an aerial photography program in Jordan, researchers are discovering more of them than ever before. They number well into the thousands.

Referred to by archaeologists as "wheels," these stone structures have a wide variety of designs, with a common one being a circle with spokes radiating inside. Researchers believe that they date back to antiquity, at least 2,000 years ago. They are often found on lava fields and range from 82 feet to 230 feet (25 meters to 70 meters) across.

 "In Jordan alone we've got stone-built structures that are far more numerous than (the) Nazca Lines, far more extensive in the area that they cover, and far older," said David Kennedy, a professor of classics and ancient history at the University of Western Australia.

Kennedy's new research, which will be published in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science, reveals that these wheels form part of a variety of stone landscapes. These include kites (stone structures used for funnelling and killing animals); pendants (lines of stone cairns that run from burials); and walls, mysterious structures that meander across the landscape for up to several hundred feet and have no apparent practical use.

His team's studies are part of a long-term aerial reconnaissance project that is looking at archaeological sites across Jordan. As of now, Kennedy and his colleagues are puzzled as to what the structures may have been used for or what meaning they held.
Fascinating structures

Kennedy's main area of expertise is in Roman archaeology, but he became fascinated by these structures when, as a student, he read accounts of Royal Air Force pilots flying over them in the 1920s on airmail routes across Jordan. "You can't not be fascinated by these things," Kennedy said.

Indeed, in 1927 RAF Flight Lt. Percy Maitland published an account of the ruins in the journal Antiquity. He reported encountering them over "lava country" and said that they, along with the other stone structures, are known to the Bedouin as the "works of the old men."

Kennedy and his team have been studying the structures using aerial photography and Google Earth, as the wheels are hard to pick up from the ground, Kennedy said.

"Sometimes when you're actually there on the site you can make out something of a pattern but not very easily," he said. "Whereas if you go up just a hundred feet or so it, for me, comes sharply into focus what the shape is."

The designs must have been clearer when they were originally built. "People have probably walked over them, walked past them, for centuries, millennia, without having any clear idea what the shape was."

(The team has created an archive of images of the wheels from various sites in the Middle East.)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/apaame (http://www.flickr.com/photos/apaame)

What were they used for?

So far, none of the wheels appears to have been excavated, something that makes dating them, and finding out their purpose, more difficult. Archaeologists studying them in the pre-Google Earth era speculated that they could be the remains of houses or cemeteries. Kennedy said that neither of these explanations seems to work out well.

"There seems to be some overarching cultural continuum in this area in which people felt there was a need to build structures that were circular."

Some of the wheels are found in isolation while others are clustered together. At one location, near the Azraq Oasis, hundreds of them can be found clustered into a dozen groups. "Some of these collections around Azraq are really quite remarkable," Kennedy said.

In Saudi Arabia, Kennedy's team has found wheel styles that are quite different: Some are rectangular and are not wheels at all; others are circular but contain two spokes forming a bar often aligned in the same direction that the sun rises and sets in the Middle East.

The ones in Jordan and Syria, on the other hand, have numerous spokes and do not seem to be aligned with any astronomical phenomena. "On looking at large numbers of these, over a number of years, I wasn't struck by any pattern in the way in which the spokes were laid out," Kennedy said.

Cairns are often found associated with the wheels. Sometimes they circle the perimeter of the wheel, other times they are in among the spokes. In Saudi Arabia some of the cairns look, from the air, like they are associated with ancient burials.

Dating the wheels is difficult, since they appear to be prehistoric, but could date to as recently as 2,000 years ago. The researchers have noted that the wheels are often found on top of kites, which date as far back as 9,000 years, but never vice versa. "That suggests that wheels are more recent than the kites," Kennedy said.

Amelia Sparavigna, a physics professor at Politecnico di Torino in Italy, told Live Science in an email that she agrees these structures can be referred to as geoglyphs in the same way as the Nazca Lines are. "If we define a 'geoglyph' as a wide sign on the ground of artificial origin, the stone circles are geoglyphs," Sparavignawrote in her email.

The function of the wheels may also have been similar to the enigmatic drawings in the Nazca desert.

 "If we consider, more generally, the stone circles as worship places of ancestors, or places for rituals connected with astronomical events or with seasons, they could have the same function of [the] geoglyphs of South America, the Nazca Lines for instance. The design is different, but the function could be the same," she wrote in her email.

Kennedy said that for now the meaning of the wheels remains a mystery. "The question is what was the purpose?"
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 15, 2011, 02:37:00 PM
Oh! Sexy.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on October 29, 2011, 04:33:45 PM
Not a mystery persay, but in honor of the freak October cold snap/wintry mix barraging the northeast....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_Without_a_Summer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_Without_a_Summer)
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on October 29, 2011, 07:14:00 PM
Now I need to dig out my Rasputina CD's...
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 04, 2012, 11:27:28 AM
So, how many movies about the Lost Colony have been made? This story always scared the crap out of me.

Quote
Researchers say they have new clue to Lost Colony

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) — A new look at a 425-year-old map has yielded a tantalizing clue about the fate of the Lost Colony, the settlers who disappeared from North Carolina's Roanoke Island in the late 16th century.

Experts from the First Colony Foundation and the British Museum in London discussed their findings Thursday at a scholarly meeting on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Their focus: the "Virginea Pars" map of Virginia and North Carolina created by explorer John White in the 1580s and owned by the British Museum since 1866.

"We believe that this evidence provides conclusive proof that they moved westward up the Albemarle Sound to the confluence of the Chowan and Roanoke rivers," said James Horn, vice president of research and historical interpretation at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation and author of a 2010 book about the Lost Colony.

"Their intention was to create a settlement. And this is what we believe we are looking at with this symbol — their clear intention, marked on the map ..."

Attached to the map are two patches. One patch appears to merely correct a mistake on the map, but the other — in what is modern-day Bertie County in northeastern North Carolina — hides what appears to be a fort. Another symbol, appearing to be the very faint image of a different kind of fort, is drawn on top of the patch.

The American and British scholars believe the fort symbol could indicate where the settlers went. The British researchers joined the Thursday meeting via webcast.

In a joint announcement, the museums said, "First Colony Foundation researchers believe that it could mark, literally and symbolically, 'the way to Jamestown.' As such, it is a unique discovery of the first importance."

White made the map and other drawings when he traveled to Roanoke Island in 1585 on an expedition commanded by Sir Ralph Lane. In 1587, a second colony of 116 English settlers landed on Roanoke Island, led by White. He left the island for England for more supplies but couldn't return again until 1590 because of the war between England and Spain.

When he came back, the colony was gone. White knew the majority had planned to move "50 miles into the maine," as he wrote, referring to the mainland. The only clue he found about the fate of the other two dozen was the word "CROATOAN" carved into a post, leading historians to believe they moved south to live with American Indians on what's now Hatteras Island.

But the discovery of the fort symbol offers the first new clue in centuries about what happened to the 95 or so settlers, experts said Thursday. And researchers at the British Museum discovered it because Brent Lane, a member of the board of the First Colony Foundation, asked a seemingly obvious question: What's under those two patches?

Researchers say the patches attached to White's excruciatingly accurate map were made with ink and paper contemporaneous with the rest of the map. One corrected mistakes on the shoreline of the Pamlico River and the placing of some villages. But the other covered the possible fort symbol, which is visible only when the map is viewed in a light box.

The map was critical to Sir Walter Raleigh's quest to attract investors in his second colony, Lane said. It was critical to his convincing Queen Elizabeth I to let him keep his charter to establish a colony in the New World. It was critical to the colonists who navigated small boats in rough waters.

So that made Lane wonder: "If this was such an accurate map and it was so critical to their mission, why in the world did it have patches on it? This important document was being shown to investors and royalty to document the success of this mission. And it had patches on it like a hand-me-down."

Researchers don't know why someone covered the symbol with a patch, although Horn said the two drawings could indicate the settlers planned to build more of a settlement than just a fort.

The land where archaeologists would need to dig eventually is privately owned, and some of it could be under a golf course and residential community. So excavating won't begin anytime soon. But it doesn't have to, said Nicholas Luccketti, a professional archaeologist in Virginia and North Carolina for more than 35 years.

Archaeologists must first re-examine ceramics, including some recovered from an area in Bertie County called Salmon Creek, he said.

"This clue is certainly the most significant in pointing where a search should continue," Lane said. "The search for the colonists didn't start this decade; it didn't start this century. It started as soon as they were found to be absent from Roanoke Island ... I would say every generation in the last 400 years has taken this search on."

But none have had today's sophisticated technology to help, he said.

"None of them had this clue on this map."
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on May 04, 2012, 12:03:44 PM
Not quite answering the unanswered, though, eh? Just changes the theorized direction they vanished in...
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 02, 2012, 01:58:28 PM
!!!

Quote
FBI: 'Credible lead' surfaces in D.B. Cooper case

SEATTLE (AP) — The FBI says it has a "credible" lead in the D.B. Cooper case involving the 1971 hijacking of a passenger jet over Washington state and the suspect's legendary parachute escape.

The fate and identity of the hijacker dubbed "D.B. Cooper" has remained a mystery in the 40 years since a man jumped from a Northwest Orient Airlines 727 flight with $200,000 in ransom.

The recent tip provided to the FBI came from a law enforcement member who directed investigators to a person who might have helpful information on the suspect, FBI spokeswoman Ayn Sandalo Dietrich told The Seattle Times on Sunday. She called the new information the "most promising lead we have right now," but cautioned that investigators were not on the verge of breaking the case.

"With any lead our first step is to assess how credible it is," Sandalo Dietrich told the Seattle Post Intelligencer on Saturday. "Having this come through another law enforcement (agency), having looked it over when we got it - it seems pretty interesting."

Dietrich says an item belonging to the man was sent to a lab in Quantico, Va., for forensic testing. She did not provide specifics about the item or the man's identity.

Federal investigators have checked more than 1,000 leads since the suspect bailed out on Nov. 24, 1971, over the Pacific Northwest. The man who jumped gave his name as Dan Cooper and claimed shortly after takeoff in Portland, Ore., that he had a bomb, leading the flight crew to land the plane in Seattle, where passengers were exchanged for parachutes and ransom money.

The flight then took off for Mexico with the suspect and flight crew on board before the man parachuted from the plane.

The FBI's recent tip in the case was first reported by The Telegraph newspaper in London.

This turned out to be...more junk on his tie (which they've been studying for 20 years!)!

Quote
In November 2011 Kaye announced that particles of pure titanium had also been found on the tie. He explained that titanium, which was much rarer in the 1970s than it is today, was found at that time only in metal fabrication or production facilities, or at chemical companies using it (combined with aluminum) to store extremely corrosive substances.[92] The findings suggested, he said, that Cooper may have been a chemist or a metallurgist, or may have worked in a metal or chemical manufacturing plant

An article I quoted shortly after RC's above -- where a woman said it was her uncle -- has also been updated. The uncle's DNA was not a match.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 02, 2012, 03:39:52 PM


The Latest Mayday Ad:
This is one that McGraw and Fajwat can waste their day on...

http://www.maydaymystery.org/mayday/

From Wikipedia:

Quote
The May Day Mystery refers to a series of cryptic ads which have been placed in the Arizona Daily Wildcat, the newspaper of the University of Arizona, every May 1 since 1981. (In 1983, 1988, 1999 and 2005 the ads technically ran on April 29, April 27, April 29 and April 29, respectively. May 1 fell on a weekend in those years, when the Daily Wildcat does not publish.) The ads have appeared on other dates as well, usually in early December. While the ads at first appear to be an intellectual game, there is an underlying message of political and economic revolution.

The first ad contained three handwritten lines: "SR/CL: RICHMOND", a string of Simplified Chinese characters, and "MAY DAY, 1981". The Chinese characters translate literally as "Chairman Mao ten-thousand years old", which is usually interpreted as "Long live Chairman Mao". [1]

There are a number of recurring themes in the ads, including:

* The Orphanage: A secret society, supposedly behind the ads
* The Prize: An unspecified reward for anyone who "solves" the mystery; in a safe deposit box
* Smiley Guy: A stylized smiley face that appears in some of the ads
* SR/CL: An unknown acronym
* White Rabbit/Wonder Bread: Unknown commodities transported by the Orphanage
* Martin Luther

Bryan Hance, a former student, discovered the ads as an undergraduate and is the first person known to seriously investigate them. He started a website in 1997 to document his investigation, and has attracted a small group of followers. He has been in contact with "The Orphanage" and others (such as "the Pimp") by email, post and phone since 1999. He has received many packages in the mail containing everything from coins and photographs to printouts from websites. He has also received many gold coins and bills, totaling over a few hundred dollars. He has been told that the money can be spent any way he wants, though Bryan tends to use it on paying the server bill.

The ads are placed by Robert Truman Hungerford, an eccentric lawyer who claims to be the legal counsel for the organization. While he refuses to discuss the origin of the ads, he has said that it is possible that he is insane and that the ads are "the ravings of a madman".

The meanings of most of the Mayday Mystery ads are unsolved.

http://www.maydaymystery.org/mayday/texts/09-dec9.html




These are ongoing -- all cataloged (since that original post in 2008) at http://www.maydaymystery.org/mayday/

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 02, 2012, 03:46:54 PM
A claim that they found Earhart:

http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/south-pacific/4070865/Claims-Amelia-Earharts-plane-found

They found a Lockheed Electra buried in coral.

There's lots of folks who say this is crap, but it backs up a theory by an archeologist in 07 that she went down at roughly the spot where they claim to have found the plane.

We'll find out for sure in a few weeks.

I love going through this thread and doing Unsolved Mysteries updates... No go on the plane, and bone fragments found belonged to...a turtle. Earhart remains a mystery.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Reginald McGraw on August 02, 2012, 08:48:10 PM
Nice updates! I'd forgotten about these.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on October 02, 2012, 11:55:29 AM
in another thread, Nacho mentioned mentioned picking my wife up at the airport after the mob whacks me. It reminded me that this was in the news recently.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/01/us/michigan-jimmy-hoffa-search/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/01/us/michigan-jimmy-hoffa-search/index.html)

Quote
Hoffa case: Soil results no guarantee of search's end

Roseville, Michigan (CNN) -- Authorities might find out Tuesday whether a body was buried under a shed in Roseville, Michigan. They just won't know whether it's missing Teamster boss Jimmy Hoffa or not.

Two soil samples were taken from a home in the suburban Detroit community of Roseville last week after a tipster claimed he saw a body buried on the property a day after Hoffa disappeared in 1975.

The samples were taken from beneath a storage shed and sent to a lab at Michigan State University for tests to determine the presence of human remains.

The hope had been to get the findings back sometime Monday. But in a press release issued Monday afternoon, Roseville Police Chief James Berlin said he'd been told that, while testing had begun, "the results of those tests will not be available until early (Tuesday) morning."

What police do know is that the samples that were unearthed didn't contain any "discernible remains," such as bones, body parts or other evidence, according to Berlin.

The search of the Roseville property is the latest in an on-again, off-again search for Hoffa, whose disappearance 35 years ago captured the public imagination.

Hoffa, then 62, was last seen on July 30, 1975, outside the Detroit-area Machus Red Fox restaurant. He was there ostensibly to meet with reputed Detroit Mafia street enforcer Anthony Giacalone and Genovese crime family figure Anthony Provenzano, who was also a chief of a Teamsters local in New Jersey. Giacalone died in 1982; Provenzano died in 1988 in prison.

The tipster, a former gambler, once did business with a man tied to Giacalone, said Dan Moldea, author of "The Hoffa Wars." Moldea said he first spoke to the tipster in March and then sent him to police.

Vanished Hoffa still fascinates after almost 40 years

Despite those links, Moldea said it seems unlikely that anyone would have been buried at the site, in full view of the neighborhood. And if a body had been buried there, little would remain, he said.

The lab tests being conducted on the soil samples will be able to determine if human remains were buried at the site, but will not identify them, Berlin said. If human remains are discovered, investigators would have to return for a more complete excavation, he said.

Even so, Berlin doubts any possible human remains discovered at the house would be those of Hoffa.

"It would be great if it was, because I would like to bring closure to his family and the tens of thousands of Teamsters that idolize this man, and just the southeast of Michigan," Berlin said.

"This is kind of like an open wound that won't go away. Every couple of years this happens, and all you guys come out here and we have to relive it."

But Berlin said the "time line doesn't really add up."

Hoffa was of the most powerful union leaders at a time when unions wielded enormous political sway. He was forced out of the organized labor movement when he went to federal prison in 1967 for jury tampering and fraud.

President Richard Nixon pardoned him in 1971 on condition he not attempt to get back into the union movement before 1980.

Hoffa believed Giacalone had set up the meeting to help settle a feud between Hoffa and Provenzano, but Hoffa was the only one who showed up for the meeting, according to the FBI. Giacalone and Provenzano later told the FBI that no meeting had been scheduled.

The FBI said at the time that the disappearance could have been linked to Hoffa's efforts to regain power in the Teamsters and the mob's influence over the union's pension funds.

Police and the FBI have searched for Hoffa intermittently.

In September 2001, the FBI found DNA that linked Hoffa to a car that agents suspected was used in his disappearance.

In 2004, authorities removed floorboards from a Detroit home to look for traces of blood, as former Teamsters official Frank Sheeran claimed in a biography that he had shot Hoffa. Sheeran died in 2003.

Two years later, the FBI razed a horse barn in Michigan following what it called "a fairly credible lead."

Urban lore long suggested that Hoffa was buried around the end zone at the former Giants Stadium in New Jersey.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on October 02, 2012, 12:00:13 PM
Yeah...been idly following this. Results today!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on October 02, 2012, 04:52:02 PM
Just needed some free construction work, I guess... (This is no surprise.)


Quote
Soil tests indicate that no human remains are buried beneath a shed in Roseville, Mich., where authorities were investigating the possibility that the late Teamsters President Jimmy Hoffa might have been buried, officials said.

http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/10/02/14183689-no-human-remains-found-at-michigan-site-of-jimmy-hoffa-tests
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on November 26, 2012, 05:16:28 PM
How come I've never heard of the "Band of Holes" before?


http://www.world-mysteries.com/mpl_piscovalley.htm

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 28, 2012, 11:55:38 AM
Not sure this is the most appropriate thread, but it's close enough. Fun stuff.

http://news.yahoo.com/fbi-removes-many-redactions-marilyn-monroe-file-131729814.html (http://news.yahoo.com/fbi-removes-many-redactions-marilyn-monroe-file-131729814.html)

Quote
FBI removes many redactions in Marilyn Monroe file

LOS ANGELES (AP) — FBI files on Marilyn Monroe that could not be located earlier this year have been found and re-issued, revealing the names of some of the movie star's acquaintances who drew concern from government officials and her own entourage.

The files had previously been heavily redacted, but more details are now public in a version of the file recently obtained by The Associated Press through the Freedom of Information Act. The updated files reveal that some in Monroe's inner circle were concerned about her association with Frederick Vanderbilt Field, who was disinherited from his wealthy family over his leftist views.

The FBI's files on Monroe show the extent the agency was monitoring the actress for ties to communism in the years before her death in August 1962. A trip to Mexico earlier that year to shop for furniture brought her in contact with Field, who was living in the country with his wife in self-imposed exile. Informants reported to the FBI that a "mutual infatuation" had developed between Field and Monroe, which caused concern among some in her inner circle, including her therapist, the files state.

"This situation caused considerable dismay among Miss Monroe's entourage and also among the (American Communist Group in Mexico)," the file states. It includes references to an interior decorator who worked with Monroe's analyst reporting her connection to Field to the doctor.

Field's autobiography devotes an entire chapter to Monroe's Mexico trip, "An Indian Summer Interlude." He mentions that he and his wife accompanied Monroe on shopping trips and meals and he only mentions politics once in a passage on their dinnertime conversations.

"She talked mostly about herself and some of the people who had been or still were important to her," Field wrote in "From Right to Left." ''She told us about her strong feelings for civil rights, for black equality, as well as her admiration for what was being done in China, her anger at red-baiting and McCarthyism and her hatred of (FBI director) J. Edgar Hoover."

Under Hoover's watch, the FBI kept tabs on the political and social lives of many celebrities, including Frank Sinatra, Charlie Chaplin and Monroe's ex-husband Arthur Miller. The bureau has also been involved in numerous investigations about crimes against celebrities, including threats against Elizabeth Taylor, an extortion case involving Clark Gable and more recently, trying to solve who killed rapper Notorious B.I.G.

The AP had sought the removal of redactions from Monroe's FBI files earlier this year as part of a series of stories on the 50th anniversary of Monroe's death. The FBI had reported that it had transferred the files to a National Archives facility in Maryland, but archivists said the documents had not been received. A few months after requesting details on the transfer, the FBI released an updated version of the files that eliminate dozens of redactions.

For years, the files have intrigued investigators, biographers and those who don't believe Monroe's death at her Los Angeles area home was a suicide.

A 1982 investigation by the Los Angeles District Attorney's Office found no evidence of foul play after reviewing all available investigative records, but noted that the FBI files were "heavily censored."

That characterization intrigued the man who performed Monroe's autopsy, Dr. Thomas Noguchi. While the DA investigation concluded he conducted a thorough autopsy, Noguchi has conceded that no one will likely ever know all the details of Monroe's death. The FBI files and confidential interviews conducted with the actress' friends that have never been made public might help, he wrote in his 1983 memoir "Coroner."

"On the basis of my own involvement in the case, beginning with the autopsy, I would call Monroe's suicide 'very probable,'" Noguchi wrote. "But I also believe that until the complete FBI files are made public and the notes and interviews of the suicide panel released, controversy will continue to swirl around her death."

Monroe's file begins in 1955 and mostly focuses on her travels and associations, searching for signs of leftist views and possible ties to communism. One entry, which previously had been almost completely redacted, concerned intelligence that Monroe and other entertainers sought visas to visit Russia that year.

The file continues up until the months before her death, and also includes several news stories and references to Norman Mailer's biography of the actress, which focused on questions about whether Monroe was killed by the government.

For all the focus on Monroe's closeness to suspected communists, the bureau never found any proof she was a member of the party.

"Subject's views are very positively and concisely leftist; however, if she is being actively used by the Communist Party, it is not general knowledge among those working with the movement in Los Angeles," a July 1962 entry in Monroe's file states.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on December 29, 2012, 02:14:43 AM
I love how they say, "redacted" instead of "censored."
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on December 29, 2012, 11:11:43 AM
There is a slight (purely semantics, probably) difference between redacted and censored.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on December 29, 2012, 12:56:39 PM
There is a slight (purely semantics, probably) difference between redacted and censored.

So slight it's barely worth mentioning - it's crowd sourced censorship.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on December 29, 2012, 01:39:40 PM
Ah! That's a very modern way to describe it. Well done.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on December 30, 2012, 11:22:59 PM
Ah! That's a very modern way to describe it. Well done.

*tips hat*
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 28, 2013, 02:03:12 PM
Pretty cool...

Quote
Experts: New clues to sinking of Confederate sub

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Scientists say a pole on the front of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley designed to plant explosives on enemy ships may hold a key clue to its sinking during the Civil War.

The experts are to release their findings Monday at a North Charleston lab where the hand-cranked sub is being preserved and studied. The Hunley was the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship.

The pole, called a spar, was once placed at the front of the sub and used to plant a powder charge into the Union blockade ship Housatonic in 1864.The Housatonic sank, while the Hunley and its eight-man crew never returned.

The sub was found in waters off South Carolina in 1995 and raised five years later. It's been in the laboratory ever since.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on March 11, 2013, 11:29:52 AM
Well...poked around for my six month update of this thread. Nothing new... Though we're weeks away from the next Mayday Mystery.

I did find this, though. Some silly Amelia Earhart expedition (that's not been finding too much of anything):

http://earhartonsaipan.com/
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 06, 2013, 05:34:44 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyatlov_pass_accident

Quote
The mysterious circumstances of the hikers' deaths have inspired much speculation. Investigations of the deaths suggest that the hikers tore open their tent from within, departing barefoot in heavy snow; while the corpses show no signs of struggle, one victim had a fractured skull, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[1] The victims' clothing contained high levels of radiation.[1] Soviet investigators determined only that "a compelling unknown force" had caused the deaths, barring entry to the area for years thereafter.[1] The causes of the accident remain unclear.[2][3]

Movie time!

http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/2011/04/dyatlov-pass-incident-film-production.html

That's my paranormal paranoia go-to site, but they usually do a good job with stuff like this. In between the OMG it's Alien Bigfoot Vampires!! you end up with a very exhaustive history -- and usually some multimedia -- of their topic of the day. This one has some great stuff on the Dyatlov Pass mystery.


They made the movie and it's a totally gay Blair Witch rip off about documentary filmmakers trying to find out what happened. Color me disappointed.

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on June 06, 2013, 08:11:17 PM
Jesus...they're not even trying.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 07, 2013, 02:22:52 PM
At least I can still make a cool version.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on June 22, 2013, 12:29:11 PM
The Voynich Manuscript -- declared a hoax -- now appears to have some sort of code built into it...

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn23740-new-signs-of-language-surface-in-mystery-voynich-text.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voynich_manuscript
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on July 07, 2013, 10:49:50 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyatlov_pass_accident

Quote
The mysterious circumstances of the hikers' deaths have inspired much speculation. Investigations of the deaths suggest that the hikers tore open their tent from within, departing barefoot in heavy snow; while the corpses show no signs of struggle, one victim had a fractured skull, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[1] The victims' clothing contained high levels of radiation.[1] Soviet investigators determined only that "a compelling unknown force" had caused the deaths, barring entry to the area for years thereafter.[1] The causes of the accident remain unclear.[2][3]

Movie time!

http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/2011/04/dyatlov-pass-incident-film-production.html

That's my paranormal paranoia go-to site, but they usually do a good job with stuff like this. In between the OMG it's Alien Bigfoot Vampires!! you end up with a very exhaustive history -- and usually some multimedia -- of their topic of the day. This one has some great stuff on the Dyatlov Pass mystery.


They made the movie and it's a totally gay Blair Witch rip off about documentary filmmakers trying to find out what happened. Color me disappointed.


Meanwhile, in an effort to have a show with a budget of $17, NBC is doing "Siberia" -- which is a drama about a reality show set in Siberia where the contestants make base camp at a place that suffered a similar incident as at Dyatlov. The game proceeds...and then things go wrong! Da-da-dum!

I'm watching episode one now and...uh...kind of enjoying it. It has the fake reality show feel that Series 7 captured.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 08, 2013, 11:54:47 PM
I just threw up in my mouth a little bit...
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Disco Dust on July 19, 2013, 09:39:52 PM
This somehow managed to slip under my radar till a few days ago:


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solway_Firth_Spaceman


To me the figure in the background is very open to conjecture.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on December 12, 2013, 04:13:02 PM
"Bloop" and "Slow Down"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloop

Quote
The Bloop is the name given to an ultra-low frequency underwater sound detected by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration several times during the summer of 1997. The source of the sound remains unknown.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slow_Down_(unidentified_sound)

Quote
Slow Down was a sound recorded on May 19, 1997, in the Equatorial Pacific ocean by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The source of the sound remains unknown.



Quote
UPDATE: from Wired.co.uk:

Has 'The Bloop' Been Solved?

"....the NOAA is pretty sure that it wasn't an animal, but the sound of a relatively common event -- the cracking of an ice shelf as it breaks up from Antarctica. Several people have linked to the NOAA's website over the past week excitedly claiming that the mystery of the Bloop has been "solved", but as the information on the NOAA website was undated and without a source, Wired.co.uk spoke to NOAA and Oregon State University seismologist Robert Dziak by email to check it out. He confirmed that the Bloop really was just an icequake -- and it turns out that's kind of what they always thought it was. The theory of a giant animal making noises loud enough to be heard across the Pacific was more fantasy than science.

Dziak explained to us the NOAA's findings, and confirmed that "the frequency and time-duration characteristics of the Bloop signal are consistent, and essentially identical, to icequake signals we have recorded off Antarctica". He explained: "We began an acoustic survey of the Bransfield Strait and Drake Passage in 2005 which lasted until 2010. It was in analysis of this recent acoustic data that it became clear that the sounds of ice breaking up and cracking is a dominant source of natural sound in the southern ocean. Each year there are tens of thousands of what we call 'icequakes' created by the cracking and melting of sea ice and ice calving off glaciers into the ocean, and these signals are very similar in character to the Bloop."

That makes it "extremely unlikely" that the sound is animal in origin, but he also pointed out that the hypothesis that the Bloop was caused by an animal wasn't ever really a serious one. He said: "What has led to a lot of the misperception of the animal origin sound of the Bloop is how the sound is played back. Typically, it is played at 16 times normal speed, which makes it sounds like an animal vocalisation of some sort. However, when the sound is played in real-time it has more of a 'quake' sound to it, similar to thunder." You can hear a recording of the Bloop in the video accompanying this story...."
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on January 24, 2014, 03:18:21 PM
Not really valid for this thread... There's no mystery. But this is where the bulk of our "ghost ship" conversations have ended up and, technically, this is a "ghost ship" that they can't quite pin down...until the horror begins!

Quote
A ghost ship filled with cannibal rats is floating somewhere off the coast of Scotland, ready to crash ashore and unleash its disease-ridden cargo of starving rodents. And it's all because Canadian authorities let the Soviet-era nightmare liner loose in the North Atlantic, satisfied that it was no longer a threat to Canada.

The "hundreds" of rats aboard the abandoned cruise ship have surely begun eating each other by now, officials say. It has been nearly a year since the vessel was intentionally lost at sea by Canadian authorities who were happy to let the "biohazard" become another country's problem.

This gruesome gift from Canada is now expected to crash ashore in Ireland or the United Kingdom, dumping the plague ship's living cargo of cannibal rats onto the land.

Named for a popular film actress in Stalin's USSR, the Lyubov Orlova was built by the Soviets in 1976 to treat Russian elites with pleasure cruises to Antarctica and the Arctic Circle.

But it was seized in 2010, by Canadian police acting as debt collectors against the ship's now-private owners, and for years it remained anchored off St. John's, the provincial capital of Newfoundland. Finally sold for scrap in 2012, the massive ship was lost at sea just a day after being towed out. When Canadian authorities finally captured the cruise ship last year, they decided to let it loose in international waters.

In our era of Google satellite maps, GPS and constant government surveillance of the most mundane activities on land, it seems peculiar that a 295-foot-long ocean vessel could disappear in the North Atlantic while still afloat. But maritime officials in Ireland and Scotland say they haven't heard from the Lyubov Orlova since March of last year, when an emergency signal from the ship placed it about 700 miles off the coast of County Kerry, Ireland. The ship itself was spotted by radar operators not long after, but search pilots sent to confirm the location couldn't find it.

Ever since, the rat ship has been missing at sea.

It may still be afloat, the Independent reports today, because its lifeboats are equipped with distress signals that only transmit when they hit water—only two of the lifeboats' transmitters have been heard, probably after those rafts were shaken loose as the Lyubov Orlova is continually tossed by North Atlantic storms. It has already traveled two-thirds of the way to the British Isles.

If the ship is spotted before a big storm slams it against the populated coastline, scrap haulers or the closest Coast Guard crews will have to board the awful vessel.

"There will be a lot of rats and they eat each other," a Belgian scrap sailor told The Sun. "If I get aboard I'll have to lace everywhere with poison."

There may be no chance to get aboard, because the 4,251-ton ship full of rats could suddenly be pushed ashore in a winter storm. Once the rats make landfall, they will be very, very hungry for something besides the raw flesh of their comrades at sea.


That's the report from io9. Here's The Weather Channel's take:


Quote
According to The National Post, another ship dispatched by Canadian authorities corralled the Lyubov Orlova and towed it further out to sea, away from Canadian oil assets, but once the feat was accomplished the ghost ship was cut-loose, because as Transport Canada put it, the vessel “no longer poses a threat to the safety of [Canadian] offshore oil installations, their personnel or the marine environment."

With no crew on board, the ship was thought to be lost forever, until March 2013, when two lifeboats fell off the ship, sending signals to authorities that the vessel had traveled two-thirds of the way across the Atlantic Ocean and was headed east, straight for the British and Irish coasts, according to The Independent.

Just a week later, radar picked up an object similar in size to the Lyubov Orlova just off the Scottish coast, the Daily Mirror reports, but search efforts returned nothing.

Months have passed with no new signals, and no sign of the ghost ship, leading many to believe the massive ship may be still intact. Adding to the speculation, a series of powerful storms have battered the coast of Ireland and the United Kingdom over the past 10 months, bringing with them powerful winds that may have pushed the abandoned vessel closer toward a collision with the "west coasts of Ireland and Scotland, or the southern tip of England," the Telegraph reports.

As for the rats? The National Post reports that the Lyubov Orlova sat in port for more than two years in Newfoundland, "virtually guaranteeing" the ship acquired a rat infestation. After a nearly year adrift with no food, many British media outlets believe that the rats may have turned on each other in order to survive.

Whether or not the cannibal rats, or an intact ghost ship exist, remains to be seen, but it sure does make for a great Hollywood horror script.

Here's your idea, RC! Rat ship washes up on a desolate island off the coast of Scotland, where only a small village stands between it and apocalypse...
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 24, 2014, 04:16:34 PM
Missus RC is obsessed with this story.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on January 24, 2014, 04:28:52 PM
Missus RC is obsessed with this story.

It's sunk. And, if not, it'll be scuttled long before it hits shore.
Missus RC is obsessed with this story.

I put it on "realtime coverage" in my Google News page. So, every few seconds, an article pops up with a title that scares the hell out of me.

Oh, but, in reality: The cannibal rats, and even the rats themselves, are based on a salvage hunter's off-handed joke to a tabloid reporter, who ran with it.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Reginald McGraw on January 24, 2014, 04:56:30 PM
And also, like my problem with zombies, the population of rats with only rats to eat, is not really going to trend upward...
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on January 24, 2014, 05:55:54 PM
And also, like my problem with zombies, the population of rats with only rats to eat, is not really going to trend upward...

And after 12 months at sea it's impossible there are still rats on there! Unless the ship has been docking somewhere and taking on supplies for the ghosts.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on January 24, 2014, 05:58:51 PM
And...the Irish coast guard just reported it sunk.

Next!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on January 28, 2014, 10:09:05 AM
Love this...

http://flavorwire.com/435374/10-incredibly-haunting-tales-of-real-life-ghost-ships/

It's the first update on the modern-day search for Baychimo, as well! (The update is: no news yet.)
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 12, 2014, 01:00:43 PM
Not a super sexy "mystery" per say, but still pretty cool.

Quote
Scientists Think They Have Found The Mythical ‘Sunstone’ Vikings Used To Navigate Warships

http://www.utaot.com/2013/03/06/scientists-think-they-have-found-the-mythical-sunstone-vikings-used-to-navigate-warships/ (http://www.utaot.com/2013/03/06/scientists-think-they-have-found-the-mythical-sunstone-vikings-used-to-navigate-warships/)
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on February 22, 2014, 01:21:02 PM
We've all been following the new discoveries circling around the Voynich Manuscript, yes?

Quote
For nearly a decade, linguists and cryptologists have obsessed over the medieval Voynich manuscript, vigorously debating whether it represents a long-lost language, or gibberish. Now some of its symbols have been matched to sounds.

big long ugly link to New Scientist (http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25105-mystery-voynich-manuscript-gets-preliminary-alphabet.html?cmpid=RSS|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|online-news#.UwjcGPldUto)
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Reginald McGraw on February 22, 2014, 11:00:25 PM
I saw that! Crazy.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on April 09, 2014, 01:03:12 PM
Today's rabbit hole is perfect for this thread!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Out-of-place_artifact

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on April 09, 2014, 01:45:21 PM
Most of those items listed are nothing but tenuous speculation, that don't hold up to actual investigation.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on April 09, 2014, 01:56:53 PM
Well, yes... But I still found it fun to journey along the path of insanity. Like the London Hammer, which is now owned by a "Creationist Museum" or some shit. Love it.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on April 09, 2014, 02:05:23 PM
It's like a modern day Pardoner's tale.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on April 14, 2014, 10:32:25 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyatlov_pass_accident

Quote
The mysterious circumstances of the hikers' deaths have inspired much speculation. Investigations of the deaths suggest that the hikers tore open their tent from within, departing barefoot in heavy snow; while the corpses show no signs of struggle, one victim had a fractured skull, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[1] The victims' clothing contained high levels of radiation.[1] Soviet investigators determined only that "a compelling unknown force" had caused the deaths, barring entry to the area for years thereafter.[1] The causes of the accident remain unclear.[2][3]

Movie time!

http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/2011/04/dyatlov-pass-incident-film-production.html

That's my paranormal paranoia go-to site, but they usually do a good job with stuff like this. In between the OMG it's Alien Bigfoot Vampires!! you end up with a very exhaustive history -- and usually some multimedia -- of their topic of the day. This one has some great stuff on the Dyatlov Pass mystery.


They made the movie and it's a totally gay Blair Witch rip off about documentary filmmakers trying to find out what happened. Color me disappointed.


Meanwhile, in an effort to have a show with a budget of $17, NBC is doing "Siberia" -- which is a drama about a reality show set in Siberia where the contestants make base camp at a place that suffered a similar incident as at Dyatlov. The game proceeds...and then things go wrong! Da-da-dum!

I'm watching episode one now and...uh...kind of enjoying it. It has the fake reality show feel that Series 7 captured.

So...I watched this (the movie).

It's Found Footage-by-the-numbers. Which is fine, because there's really no way to make Found Footage movies unique...

But, then, in the final reel, they try to make it unique, and that turns the movie into a fascinating and horrible disaster. What is, at first, a great twist -- a secret and apparently long-forgotten Soviet bunker -- becomes an insane derailment of epic proportions. We go from inexplicable people trying to kill them, to a weird Philadelphia Experiment inspired sub-story, to poorly rendered attempts at copying the REC monster that come off looking more like something from a mid 2000's video game, to the dogged insistence that you, the audience, are intimately familiar with the Philadelphia Experiment conspiracy theories, to a bizarre version of Timecrimes, to ancient indian curses, to lost alien wormhole technology, and a time paradox that makes no sense and almost feels like, as it was being added in, they forgot what time period they were in. We jump to 1959 and back, but everyone clearly forgets which time period they're in. It's the simplest of paradoxes -- 2013 people zapped back to 1959 and have a hand in creating what happens to them in 2013 -- but, then, the writers completely lose track of time, where their characters are, and fail to conceptualize the world of 50 years ago (Soviet officers recognize a digital camera for what it is?). But, then, I think maybe the twist was that the Soviet "protectors" in 1959 were also the unexplained guys in 2013. But...that doesn't work, because... Well... Oh, man.

This fucked up ending is so fucked up, so terribly and poorly conceived and executed, that it's a classic example of "so bad it's good." I laughed myself silly in stunned wonder/horror as the script fell apart in front of me. I'd actually recommend watching it, in that old school MST3K way. 
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 12, 2014, 01:03:16 PM
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/09/stonehenge-area-inhabited-thousands-years_n_5289118.html (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/09/stonehenge-area-inhabited-thousands-years_n_5289118.html)

Quote
Stonehenge Discovery 'Blows Lid Off' Old Theories About Builders Of Ancient Monument

From who built it to what it was used for, Stonehenge is surrounded by many enduring mysteries -- and researchers from the University of Buckingham in England now say they've solved one of them.

"For years people have been asking why is Stonehenge where it is, now at last, we have found the answers,” David Jacques, an archaeology research fellow at the university, said in a written statement.

Last October, Jacques led an archaeological dig at a site 1.5 miles from Stonehenge. His team unearthed flint tools and the bones of aurochs, extinct cow-like animals that were a food source for ancient people. Carbon dating of the bones showed that modern-day Amesbury, an area that includes the dig site and Stonehenge itself, has been continuously occupied since 8820 B.C. Amesbury has now been declared the oldest continually occupied area in Britain.

The finding suggests that Stonehenge was built by indigenous Britons who had lived in the area for thousands of years. Previous theories held that the monument was built in an empty landscape by migrants from continental Europe.

"The site blows the lid off the Neolithic Revolution in a number of ways," Jacques said in the statement, referring to the assumption that those migrants drove Britain's transition from a hunter-gatherer to a farming society in the 6th Century B.C. "It provides evidence for people staying put, clearing land, building, and presumably worshipping, monuments."

The researchers say evidence suggests that before erecting Stonehenge, people living in the area set up gigantic timbers between 8820 and 6590 B.C. -- a sort of wooden precursor to the stone monument. Jacques likened the area to a "Stonehenge Visitor's Center," where visitors from far and wide came to feast and tour the site with local guides.

"The area was clearly a hub point for people to come to from many miles away, and in many ways was a forerunner for what later went on at Stonehenge itself," he said.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on May 12, 2014, 01:11:30 PM
Jesus Christ, Huffpo! Woodhenge, and the "Beaker culture" and supporting settlements that eventually built Stonehenge were discovered in 1925!

Absolutely nobody knows anything about history anymore, do they? In 30 years, I'm going to write away for an archaeology degree and then release a viral video about how I discovered the location of the first shot fired during an event known as "the Civil War" by the ancients...
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on May 12, 2014, 03:18:55 PM
Ugh. Everybody knows Stone Henge was built for the lizards.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on July 16, 2014, 11:09:30 AM
From SA --

Quote
the best number station in my opinion is the one thats in the middle of bumfuck russia that did nothing but broadcast a series of 3 tones for 27 years, then, in the middle of the night, the routine was interupted by a voice saying something in russian, twice.

then it went back to broadcasting the tones.

some guy actually managed to record it, ill try to post the link if i can remember the name of the station, its the scariest fucking thing ever if you really think about it.

edit: heres a page on it, its called ubv-76 and it has a recording, i dont know if its the recording of the guy interupting it but you get the jist of how creepy it would be.

http://www.freewebs.com/meterbands/numberstations2.html

edit 2: found the recording

http://www.geocities.com/uvb76/buzzer-message-091202.mp3

Hoping I'll find a translation...



Quote
I tried to translate, but it's super garbled. Here is my best attempt:

<beginning is super garbled. part of it sounds like "seventy-six". a short part is repeated twice. i think the message is something like "this is site one hundred and seventy six".>

<more garbled stuff>

<something ending in "two">

thirty-six (or 33?), ninety-three, eighty-two

<garbled>

six, two, six, nine, one

<garbled>

<something like "... of the code">

<some names?>

tatiana

three, six, nine, three, eight, two, seven (or 8?), zero

<long pause>

<then the message is apparently repeated, starting with the "seventy six" thing>

seven hundred two (or 602?), six hundred ninety one

<garbled>

thirty six, ninety three, eighty two, <two digit number ending in 0>

<garbled>

six, two, six, nine, one

<garbled>

tatiana

<garbled>

three, six, nine, three, eight, two, <8 or 7>, zero



http://io9.com/a-great-way-to-listen-to-those-mysterious-number-stati-1605472855

Quote
The University of Twente in the Netherlands maintains a web-based shortwave radio that anyone can access. War is Boring recommends its two favorite "numbers stations":

The Buzzer: Tune the dial to 4625 kHz and you'll hear a repetitive buzzing noise. This obnoxious station goes by the call sign UVB-76, but shortwave aficionados call it The Buzzer. The Buzzer has been blaring that tone since the early 1980s. On occasion, the buzzing stops. A voice comes on and reads numbers and letters in Russian.

Yosemite Sam: The cranky gunslinger from old Bugs Bunny cartoons began screaming across the shortwave band around 2004. He's hard to pinpoint because he moves. But you can typically find him at 3700 kHz or 6500 kHz.

Every broadcast begins with a millisecond-long compressed data burst followed by a sound clip of Yosemite Sam. The data burst and sound clip then moves to a higher frequency. This broadcast is repeated over a two minute period before receding back into the darkness. To date, no one has decoded the data burst.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on July 16, 2014, 11:11:05 AM
It's aliens!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 04, 2014, 11:34:10 AM
Numbers Stations are this week's Wiki Workhole:

http://www.avclub.com/article/explore-century-old-mystery-numbers-stations-207413
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 15, 2014, 10:54:22 AM
News worth following! Uncovering the "hidden" (faded, worn) text on the map that influenced Columbus:

http://www.wired.com/2014/09/martellus-map/

Results later this year. Hopefully it'll say something interesting beyond "dunno what's here, homes."
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 25, 2014, 12:58:27 PM
Annoying narrator...but a few things here I didn't know about. So now you can watch it and join me on the Wiki Wormhole that it inspires....


Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 25, 2014, 01:08:28 PM
And, man... The Sarah Joe...


http://1dustytrack.blogspot.com/2013/11/unsolved-mystery-of-the-sarah-joe.html

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 25, 2014, 01:32:18 PM
I'm so coming back to this later.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Reginald McGraw on September 25, 2014, 03:18:32 PM
And, man... The Sarah Joe...


http://1dustytrack.blogspot.com/2013/11/unsolved-mystery-of-the-sarah-joe.html



That is freaky.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on October 30, 2014, 02:10:20 PM
A claim that they found Earhart:

http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/south-pacific/4070865/Claims-Amelia-Earharts-plane-found

They found a Lockheed Electra buried in coral.

There's lots of folks who say this is crap, but it backs up a theory by an archeologist in 07 that she went down at roughly the spot where they claim to have found the plane.

We'll find out for sure in a few weeks.

I love going through this thread and doing Unsolved Mysteries updates... No go on the plane, and bone fragments found belonged to...a turtle. Earhart remains a mystery.


Earhart update!

Quote
After decades of looking, researchers say they may finally have found a bit of wreckage from Amelia Earhart's plane.

The aluminum fragment was recovered in 1991 on Nikumaroro, an uninhabited island in the Pacific Ocean about 2,000 miles southwest of Hawaii. Some believe Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, lived there as castaways after being forced to land during their 1937 attempt to circumnavigate the globe.

“This is the first time an artifact found on Nikumaroro has been shown to have a direct link to Amelia Earhart,” Ric Gillespie, executive director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), the non-profit group that made the identification, told Discovery News.

...

In 2013, sonar data revealed a strange 22-foot-long object under 600 feet of water near the remote island. At the time, TIGHAR speculated that the object was a piece of the Electra's fuselage.

The research group hopes to return to the area around Nikumaroro in June for a closer look at the sonar anomaly and to search for other potential relics.

Links, pics, videos at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/30/amelia-earhart-plane-fragment-found_n_6069970.html?utm_hp_ref=science
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on October 31, 2014, 09:52:45 AM
Wow...this Earhart discovery might actually have legs.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on October 31, 2014, 10:02:23 AM
Unlike Earhart!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 16, 2015, 03:40:17 PM
Recent history, but history nonetheless.

Quote
Long Lost Beagle Probe Finally Found On Mars

http://www.iflscience.com/space/missing-12-years-long-lost-beagle-probe-finally-found-mars (http://www.iflscience.com/space/missing-12-years-long-lost-beagle-probe-finally-found-mars)
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on January 19, 2015, 09:55:21 AM
!!!

Quote
FBI: 'Credible lead' surfaces in D.B. Cooper case

SEATTLE (AP) — The FBI says it has a "credible" lead in the D.B. Cooper case involving the 1971 hijacking of a passenger jet over Washington state and the suspect's legendary parachute escape.

The fate and identity of the hijacker dubbed "D.B. Cooper" has remained a mystery in the 40 years since a man jumped from a Northwest Orient Airlines 727 flight with $200,000 in ransom.

The recent tip provided to the FBI came from a law enforcement member who directed investigators to a person who might have helpful information on the suspect, FBI spokeswoman Ayn Sandalo Dietrich told The Seattle Times on Sunday. She called the new information the "most promising lead we have right now," but cautioned that investigators were not on the verge of breaking the case.

"With any lead our first step is to assess how credible it is," Sandalo Dietrich told the Seattle Post Intelligencer on Saturday. "Having this come through another law enforcement (agency), having looked it over when we got it - it seems pretty interesting."

Dietrich says an item belonging to the man was sent to a lab in Quantico, Va., for forensic testing. She did not provide specifics about the item or the man's identity.

Federal investigators have checked more than 1,000 leads since the suspect bailed out on Nov. 24, 1971, over the Pacific Northwest. The man who jumped gave his name as Dan Cooper and claimed shortly after takeoff in Portland, Ore., that he had a bomb, leading the flight crew to land the plane in Seattle, where passengers were exchanged for parachutes and ransom money.

The flight then took off for Mexico with the suspect and flight crew on board before the man parachuted from the plane.

The FBI's recent tip in the case was first reported by The Telegraph newspaper in London.

This turned out to be...more junk on his tie (which they've been studying for 20 years!)!

Quote
In November 2011 Kaye announced that particles of pure titanium had also been found on the tie. He explained that titanium, which was much rarer in the 1970s than it is today, was found at that time only in metal fabrication or production facilities, or at chemical companies using it (combined with aluminum) to store extremely corrosive substances.[92] The findings suggested, he said, that Cooper may have been a chemist or a metallurgist, or may have worked in a metal or chemical manufacturing plant

An article I quoted shortly after RC's above -- where a woman said it was her uncle -- has also been updated. The uncle's DNA was not a match.

So someone got me Skyjack: The Hunt for D. B. Cooper (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0307451305/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0307451305&linkCode=as2&tag=santafewriterspr&linkId=DD4CY6MRP52CAEBS) off of my wishlist.

It's probably less about Cooper and more about Cooper's world, and the people who have chased him all this time. Every goddamned page is a Wiki hole... We open up with a fascinating history of the Stewardess. How a series of crashes in 1969-71 led to the development of the "sexy Stewardess," complete with boot camp schools and outlandish regulation. Stews had to weight in once a month and, if they put on too much weight, they were put on unpaid probation until they lost weight. For Northwest, they were forced to wear wigs and slinky uniforms. For Southwest, they had stripper-style zip-away uniforms that they would strip out of in front of passengers -- greeting to dinner service to cocktail hour...

The airlines all openly said that the idea was to distract the passenger, to provide something to alleviate fears of flying. A Northwest ad campaign was "Fly me!" with stuff like -- "I'm Cheryl -- fly me!" "We're you're cabin crew, and you can fly us like you've never flown before."

The life of the stewardess, though, is horrifically empty and lonely. No unions, and no controls. They're preyed upon, they're slaves to the airline, they're servants. The airline would post spotters on flights to make sure the stews were being sexy enough and looked good enough... You never knew if a spotter from corporate was there evaluating the size of your hips, the width of your smile, the amount of cleavage...

Into all this walks D.B. Cooper. A genteel man who, in the space of an hour, creates a bizarre sort of Stockholm Syndrome with flight crew and passengers alike that persists today. And out he goes again, down the aftstairs and into legend.

And for 40 years, the people chasing him become increasingly obsessed and insane. It's total madness. And an amazing story.

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on March 03, 2015, 04:15:01 PM
I don't think I've talked about the Amber Room in this thread... It's one of my favorite lost art mysteries.

The Amber Room was built in 1701 and given to Peter the Great as a gift in 1716. Peter's daughter upgraded it and changed it around -- eventually commissioning ten years worth of labor and over 13,000 pounds of amber. The room itself is nearly 600 square feet.

The room was lit by about 500 candles and the amber would pick up the light, so the entire place glowed with a fiery gold hue that's, supposedly, the most amazing thing ever or whatever.

The room is pretty much priceless... The raw value of the amber comes to about $250 million, but you'd have to be insane to cannibalize the amber room if you found it. But, perhaps, something like that happened. In 2011, in Russia, $30 million of amber was found walled into a cellar, and the amber appeared to be (inconclusively) from the Amber Room.

In 1941, as the Germans closed in, attempts to disassemble the Amber Room resulted in some extensive damage (which probably explains that 2011 cache). The Soviets decided to cover it up instead. This fell through since the Germans had their own Monuments Men and knew exactly where to go... These experts then successfully disassembled the room and shipped it home where, from 1941 till the end of the war, it was on display at Konigsberg Castle.

Here we get into the mystery... Hitler ordered the room disassembled and hidden. Erich Koch, one of Hitler's chief civilian administrators, was in charge...but in 1945, he had other plans. He was cashing out and skipping town. Eventually arrested by the Brits in 1949, the Soviets demanded that he be extradited for trial. Sentenced to death, he successfully bargained to have the sentence commuted to life in prison by promising to reveal the location of looted art. Along with the recovery of several items, he promised that he knew the location of the Amber Room -- it was on a U-Boat that had been sunk shortly before the end of the war, destination top secret (this is part of the origin myth behind the Antarctic Base conspiracy theory).

It took till the 60s for technology to catch up with the requirements to make a dive for the U-Boat...and nothing was found. By then, Koch's deal had paid off and he clammed up. No more talk, just leave me alone. Though he did tell an interrogator in 1965 and, again, in 1967 that the Room was in a bunker in Konigsberg, and generally blamed everything on Himmler and played dumb as to the location.

So back to 1945. Koch gets the order to dissemble and hide the Amber Room. The details of the order are unknown, but it WAS issued. Surviving records indicate that Koch ignored Hitler and took off, leaving the Room to be destroyed by Allied bombers along with the castle museum where it was on display. A study of the ruins for amber was inconclusive, but the Soviets wouldn't let anyone near it. They sealed off the castle, claimed that they found nothing, and Brezhnev personally ordered that the castle's ruins be destroyed utterly and paved over in 1965.

So, the conspiracy theories:

1) It did make it onto a U-boat
2) It's in a bunker somewhere beneath Konigsberg
3) The Soviets recovered it but used its alleged loss as political leverage

So...the article below is the latest in this saga, pursuing the bunker theory.





Quote
A pensioner has started digging in Germany's western Ruhr region for the Amber Room, a priceless work of art looted by Nazis from the Soviet Union during World War Two and missing for 70 years, but says he needs a new drill to help him.

Dubbed the Eighth Wonder of the World, the Amber Room was an ornate chamber made of amber panels given to Czar Peter the Great by Prussia's Friedrich Wilhelm I in 1716.

German troops stole the treasure chamber from a palace near St Petersburg in 1941 and took it to Koenigsberg, now the Russian enclave of Kaliningrad, before it disappeared.

Conspiracy theories abound about the whereabouts of what some say is the world's most valuable piece of lost art. Some historians think it was destroyed in the war, others say Germans smuggled it to safety.

Now 68-year-old pensioner Karl-Heinz Kleine says he thinks the chamber is hidden under the town of Wuppertal, deep in western Germany's industrial Ruhr area.

After analyzing the evidence, Kleine has concluded that Erich Koch, who was the Nazis' chief administrator in East Prussia, may have secretly dispatched it to his home town.

"Wuppertal has a large number of tunnels and bunkers which have not yet been searched for the Amber Room. We have started looking in possible hiding places here," Kleine said.

"But the search is very costly. We need helpers, special equipment and money," Kleine told Reuters, adding that a building firm which had lent him a drill had asked for it back.

"I only have a small pension, a new machine is too expensive for me. But whoever helps will get his share of the Amber Room when we find it," he told Reuters.

"I am optimistic. I just need the tools, then it could go quickly," he said.

Even Communist East Germany's loathed Stasi secret police tried and failed to find the Amber Room. Hobby treasure hunters have launched expensive searches for it across Germany, from lake bottoms to mines in the eastern Ore Mountains. But in vain.

Historians say Erich Koch, convicted of war crimes by a Polish court, amassed a hoard of looted art and had it transported west from Koenigsberg in the final months of the war as the Soviet forces drew closer.

Russian craftsmen, helped by German funds, have recreated a replica of the Amber Room at the Catherine Palace from where the original was stolen.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Reginald McGraw on March 26, 2015, 06:52:25 PM
https://xkcd.com/1501/
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on March 26, 2015, 08:04:02 PM
I agree!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on June 09, 2015, 11:56:53 AM
Recently released footage of Amelia before she was kidnapped by aliens:

http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/found-footage-of-amelia-earhart-just-before-her-last-flight
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on June 15, 2015, 12:35:04 PM
News worth following! Uncovering the "hidden" (faded, worn) text on the map that influenced Columbus:

http://www.wired.com/2014/09/martellus-map/

Results later this year. Hopefully it'll say something interesting beyond "dunno what's here, homes."


http://phys.org/news/2015-06-hidden-secrets-world-revealed-multispectral.html


I love how the results are all largely stating the obvious (from our perspective). Yeah, there are like lions here or some shit. And there are crazy natives here.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 20, 2015, 07:36:26 PM
The headline is far sexier than the actual information, but this piece is still pretty interesting.

http://www.history.com/news/archaeologists-find-new-clues-to-lost-colony-mystery (http://www.history.com/news/archaeologists-find-new-clues-to-lost-colony-mystery)

Quote
Archaeologists Find New Clues to “Lost Colony” Mystery

In 1587, Englishman John White led more than 100 men, women and children in the first attempt to found a permanent English colony in the New World. The group settled on Roanoke Island, one of a chain of barrier islands now known as the Outer Banks, off the coast of North Carolina. Later that year, White headed back to England to bring more supplies, but England’s naval war with Spain would delay his return for nearly three years. When he finally arrived on Roanoke Island, on August 18, 1590, White found the colony abandoned and looted, with no trace of the settlers. Only two clues remained: The word “Croatoan” had been carved on a post and the letters “CRO” scratched into a tree trunk. Now, two separate teams of archaeologists say they have uncovered new evidence suggesting what may have happened to the inhabitants of the famed “Lost Colony.”

When John White, appointed by Sir Walter Raleigh as governor of Roanoke Colony, returned to England for more supplies in late 1587, he left behind his wife, his daughter and his infant granddaughter—Virginia Dare, the first child born in the New World to English parents—among the other settlers. Upon White’s return in 1590, he found no trace of his family or the other inhabitants of the abandoned colony. Over the centuries to come, archaeologists, historians and explorers would delve into the mystery of the “Lost Colony” of Roanoke, all failing to find definitive answers.

Based on the scant clues left behind, some speculated that Native Americans attacked and killed the English colonists. “Croatoan” was the name of an island south of Roanoke, now Hatteras Island, which at the time was home to a Native American tribe of the same name. Alternatively, they might have tried to sail back to England on their own and been lost at sea, or been killed by hostile Spaniards who came north from their own settlements in Florida. One enduring theory was that the settlers might have been absorbed into friendly Native American tribes, perhaps after moving further inland into what is now North Carolina.

Now, two independent teams have found archaeological remains suggesting that at least some of the Roanoke colonists might have survived and split into two groups, each of which assimilated itself into a different Native American community. One team is excavating a site near Cape Creek on Hatteras Island, around 50 miles (80 kilometers) southeast of the Roanoke Island settlement, while the other is based on the mainland about 50 miles to the northwest of the Roanoke site.

Cape Creek, located in a live oak forest near Pamlico Sound, was the site of a major Croatoan town center and trading hub. In 1998, archaeologists from East Carolina University stumbled upon a unique find from early British America: a 10-carat gold signet ring engraved with a lion or horse, believed to date to the 16th century. The ring’s discovery prompted later excavations at the site led by Mark Horton, an archaeologist at Britain’s Bristol University, who has been directing volunteers with the Croatoan Archaeological Society in annual digs since 2009. Recently, Horton’s team found a small piece of slate that seems to have been used as a writing tablet and part of the hilt of an iron rapier, a light sword similar to those used in England in the late 16th century, along with other artifacts of European and Native American origin. The slate, a smaller version of a similar one found at Jamestown, bears a small letter “M” still barely visible in one corner; it was found alongside a lead pencil.

In addition to these intriguing objects, the Cape Creek site yielded an iron bar and a large copper ingot (or block), both found buried in layers of earth that appear to date to the late 1500s. Native Americans lacked such metallurgical technology, so they are believed to be European in origin. Horton told National Geographic that some of the artifacts his team found are trade items, but it appears that others may well have belonged to the Roanoke colonists themselves: “The evidence is that they assimilated with the Native Americans but kept their goods.”

A watercolor map drawn by none other than John White inspired the search at Site X (as it’s known), located on Albemarle Sound near Edenton, North Carolina, some 50 miles inland. Known as La Virginea Pars, the map shows the East Coast of North America from Chesapeake Bay to Cape Lookout; it is housed at the British Museum as part of its permanent collection. White began drawing the map in 1585, two years before he became governor. In 2012, researchers using X-ray spectroscopy and other imaging techniques spotted a tiny four-pointed star, colored red and blue, concealed under a patch of paper that White used to make corrections to his map. It was thought to mark the location of a site some 50 miles inland, which White alluded to in testimony given after his attempted return to the colony. If such a site did exist, the theory went, it would have been a reasonable destination for the displaced Roanoke settlers.

According to archaeologist Nicholas Luccketti of the First Colony Foundation, which is conducting the excavations at Site X, the group has found shards of pottery that they claim may have been used by Roanoke settlers after they left the colony. Located nearby is a site that archaeologists believe might have been a small Native American town, Mettaquem. After the Roanoke colony met its end, English settlers eventually came south from Virginia into North Carolina, but the first recorded settler in the area did not arrive until about 1655. But the recently uncovered pottery is in a style called Border Ware, which is typical of the pottery dug up on Roanoke Island, as well as at Jamestown, but was no longer imported to the New World after the early 17th century, when the Virginia Company dissolved.

In addition to the Border Ware pottery, archaeologists at Site X discovered various other items, including a food-storage jar known as a baluster, pieces of early gun flintlocks, a metal hook of the sort used to stretch animal hides or tents and an aglet, a small copper tube used to secure wool fibers before the advent of the hook and eye in the 17th century. Based on his team’s findings, Luccketti thinks the Roanoke colonists may have moved inland to live with Native American allies sometime after White left, and these artifacts might have been among their belongings. As reported in the New York Times, the First Colony Foundation will reveal more about its findings and theory this week in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Though the newly announced discoveries don’t solve this lingering historical mystery, they do point away from Roanoke Island itself, where researchers have failed to come up with evidence pointing to the Lost Colony’s fate. Archaeologists on both teams are hoping that a detailed study of their new finds will yield more clues, and—of course—that more evidence remains, waiting to be discovered, in the endless layers of dirt that surround them.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on August 21, 2015, 08:09:34 AM
Man, I saved a few in-depth articles on that in my Feedly and meant to post them here... But my daytime computer life has been so limited.

I'm a sucker for this kind of stuff, so it is as sexy as the headline! But, then, I'm the guy who watches three hour history channel specials about people who can't speak English whose job it is to explore the circa 70AD sewer grates in the Colosseum.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 18, 2015, 09:55:07 AM
This qualifies for, like, a dozen threads...but I figured I'd put it here because I love this thread most of all! Joe Hill has a theory about a cold case. A blurb and links below... All a wormhole!

Quote
Author Joe Hill knows a thing or two about horror and mystery—after all, his dad is famed horror writer Stephen King. So when he comes up with a new theory about an unsolved murder, people listen.

The Lady Of The Dunes is a cold case from July 1974, when two girls found the body of a nearly decapitated woman on the side of the road. Her murderer tried many tactics to hide her identity—removing her teeth and hands, for example. After many attempts to reconstruct the woman’s features, she is still unidentified and the murderer was never caught.

http://www.avclub.com/article/jaws-extra-victim-unsolved-murder-case-224799?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=feeds
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_of_the_Dunes
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: Reginald McGraw on September 24, 2015, 04:56:55 PM
Facinating...
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 16, 2016, 11:11:50 PM
The Queen Anne's Revenge confirmed...

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/08/110829-blackbeard-shipwreck-pirates-archaeology-science/

Quote
Blackbeard's Ship Confirmed off North Carolina

After 15 years of uncertainty, a shipwreck off the coast of North Carolina has been confirmed as that of the infamous 18th-century pirate Blackbeard, state officials say.

The Queen Anne's Revenge grounded on a sandbar near Beaufort (see map) in 1718, nine years after the town had been established. Blackbeard and his crew abandoned the ship and survived.

Until recently, the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources emphasized that the wreck, discovered in 1995, was "thought to be" the Queen Anne's Revenge.

Now, after a comprehensive review of the evidence, those same officials are sure it's the ship sailed by one of history's fiercest and most colorful pirates.

"There was not one aha moment," said Claire Aubel, public relations coordinator for the North Carolina Maritime Museums. "There was a collection of moments and a deduction based on the evidence."

There were two main reasons for the team's certainty, Aubel said: the sheer size of the wreck and the many weapons that were found in the rubble.

No other ship as big as the Queen Anne's Revenge was known to have been in the area at the time, and a pirate ship would have been well armed, she said.

Shipwreck Loot Points to Blackbeard

Blackbeard achieved his infamous immortality in only a few years, operating in the Caribbean Sea and off the coast of colonial America before being killed in a battle with British ships in North Carolina's Pamlico Sound in 1718. (Also see "Grim Life Cursed Real Pirates of Caribbean.")

Some historians have speculated that he deliberately ran the Queen Anne's Revenge aground so that he could keep the most valuable plunder for himself.

Such loot has helped archaeologists link the wreck to Blackbeard since excavations started in 1997. Among the major recovered artifacts are:

—Apothecary weights stamped with tiny fleurs-de-lis, royal symbols of 18th-century France. Queen Anne's Revenge was actually a former French ship, Le Concorde, captured by Blackbeard in 1717. He forced Le Concorde's surgeon to join the pirate crew, and a surgeon at that time likely would have had apothecary weights.

—A small amount of gold found among lead shot. Archaeologists think a French crewman might have hidden the gold in a barrel of shot to conceal it from Blackbeard's pirates.

—A bell engraved with the date 1705.

ID of Blackbeard's Ship Never Really in Doubt

The disclaimer about the wreck's identity was more an acknowledgement of the strict code of scientific scrutiny than the result of any serious doubts about the ship's identity, said Erik Goldstein, curator of arts and numismatics—the study of coins and tokens—for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in Virginia. Archaeologists working on the wreck were always sure of its identity.

State officials "were just being safe," Goldstein said. "At the beginning phase of an excavation, unless you find something like a ship's bell with the name engraved on it, it takes a little while to put the pieces together and gather documentary evidence. It was good, responsible behavior on the part of those folks."

There were two reasons for dropping the official doubt about the identity of the shipwreck, added David Moore, curator of nautical archaeology at the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort.

First, the museum recently opened "Blackbeard's Queen Anne's Revenge," a greatly expanded exhibit of artifacts from the shipwreck. Had the confirmation of the ship's identity not been made, curators would have had to title the exhibition something like "Artifacts From the Purported Queen Anne's Revenge," Moore said.

Also, removing the official caveat could help the museum secure private funding to continue excavating the wreck, Moore said. Although the state legislature provides some funding, he said, tight budgets are cutting into that money.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on July 12, 2016, 06:02:59 PM
So History channel did a whole thing that "blew open" the DB Cooper case. I watched it. The first two hours were The Story So Far, and the next two hours were all conjecture and Al Capone's vault BS.

The premiere of the show, and the fact that the FBI gets pretty razzed throughout the whole four hours, may have led to this:

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/fbi-closes-b-cooper-case-lack-credible-leads-article-1.2707826

Quote
The FBI has closed the book on one of the greatest riddles of all time.

The lone agent assigned to the D.B. Cooper manhunt was assigned to other mysteries within the federal agency on Friday, effectively shuttering the 45-year-old case after the FBI — and troves of tipsters — failed to identity the infamous hijacker, the FBI announced.

“Unfortunately, none of the well-meaning tips or applications of new investigative technology have yielded the necessary proof,” FBI spokeswoman Ayn Dietrich-Williams said in a statement late Monday.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 12, 2016, 08:02:51 PM
So, have they made any interesting DB Cooper movies?
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on July 12, 2016, 08:22:57 PM
So, have they made any interesting DB Cooper movies?

If you can find it, The Pursuit of DB Cooper is a 1980 film that stars Robert Duvall and Treat Williams. It's not a good movie, but Duvall and Williams really bring it.

Everything else is shit.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 14, 2016, 07:45:07 AM
We found the Terror:

http://www.cnn.com/2016/09/13/travel/hms-terror-franklin-expedition-ship-found-trnd/

Quote
HMS Terror, a long-lost ship that vanished while searching for the Northwest Passage, sparking one of the world's great maritime mysteries, is believed to have been found, almost 170 years on.

The Arctic Research Foundation said it spotted the vessel, part of Sir John Franklin's polar expedition, on the sea bed off King William Island in the Canadian Arctic.
"If you could lift this boat out of the water, and pump the water out, it would probably float." foundation spokesman Adrian Schimnowski said.
Schimnowski said the ship was found in nearly pristine condition in about 80 feet of water, with most windowpanes still intact.
"Everything points to HMS Terror," he said.
The discovery came with the help of an Inuit ranger who told Schimnowski about seeing a mast protruding through the ice one day while on a fishing trip seven years ago.
"What's great about this discovery is that the search for this vessel was led by an Inuit story that had great validity and truth to it," Schimnowski said.
Forensic archaeologists will study images and film of the wreckage to confirm it is the HMS Terror.
"We do not take anything away from the site," Schimnowski said. "It is a sacred site. It has to be respected."
HMS Terror and its sister ship, HMS Erebus, together with a total of 129 men, disappeared in the late 1840s while under the command of British explorer Sir John Franklin.

Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 20, 2016, 03:06:14 PM
We found a skeleton at the Antikythera  wreck -- the ship from which we recovered the mysterious, complicated, and not quite understood "computer."

We've been assuming it's Celtic in origin, but now it looks like we'll get to figure out exactly who it did belong to. Or, at least, who was shipping it.


http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/found-a-2000-year-old-skeleton-at-the-antikythera-wreck
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on September 28, 2016, 09:22:57 AM
Summarise!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 28, 2016, 12:03:42 PM
Summarise!


Longer:
This device is strangely advanced for who we thought the Celts were, but we don't actually properly know who the Celts were because of Rome so now maybe we will and maybe we were also making a wild assumption that it had something to do with them.

Shorter:
We don't know what this thing is but we found a skull so at least we know it's not aliens.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: monkey! on October 01, 2016, 11:02:23 AM
Celts didn't exist.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on October 01, 2016, 12:09:00 PM
The Gauls, then! The proto-Frogs!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on July 05, 2017, 11:14:22 AM
Earhart in the news again. This time with a recently discovered (read declassified) photo.

Not very clear... But with other vague evidence it goes a long way towards supporting the "captured by the Japanese" theory.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 05, 2017, 02:22:34 PM
Just coming to post about this!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on July 05, 2017, 04:07:02 PM
Just coming to post about this!

The Japanese did a really good job at purging their records in 1945. They had a great window of opportunity (many weeks) to do so.

I really do think she was captured, though... TIGHAR has pretty much disproven the Gardner Island theory. Though they seem loathe to admit that!
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on July 13, 2017, 03:03:29 PM
And... Debunked. Research has turned up the same photo with a caption dated 1935. History Channel offers no comment to spoofing the photo. Shame.
Title: Re: History's Mysteries
Post by: nacho on September 08, 2017, 07:22:17 PM
More on this thing (though nothing conclusive...so more of the same):

http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/solve-mystery-voynich-manuscript-gibbs-crytography