Author Topic: Office 7: Transitions  (Read 3996 times)

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Offline nacho

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Re: Office 7: Transitions
« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2011, 10:26:02 AM »
Man... I'm so pretending this show went off the air.

Offline nacho

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Re: Office 7: Transitions
« Reply #16 on: September 23, 2011, 08:50:24 AM »
Watched the season eight premiere. My Spader fandom demanded that I, at least, give it a chance.

I ended up doing chores and paying attention whenever Spader was on screen, but even he seemed to be phoning it in.

Offline RottingCorpse

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Re: Office 7: Transitions
« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2011, 02:15:11 PM »
Studio Exec: "Let's target all the Doctor Who fans!"

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Acclaimed British Comedy Actress Catherine Tate Returns to Dunder Mifflin Sabre this Season on NBC's The Office

    UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. - October 21, 2011 - British Comedy Award winner and BAFTA nominee Catherine Tate (BBC's "The Catherine Tate Show") returns to "The Office" this season reprising her role as Nellie Bertram. Joining the second half of the current season, Tate's Bertram is hired by friend and Chairman of the Board Jo Bennett (Kathy Bates, not seen) as a misguided special projects manager working directly for the corporate office and who very much enjoys the favoritism received from Bennett.

    Tate was introduced to "The Office" audience in last season's finale episode as one of the candidates interviewing for the regional manager position left vacant by Michael Scott.

    "Catherine is hysterical. We introduced her briefly in last season's finale and knew she had to be a part of the show somehow. We'll meet her again as corporate's special projects manager, and her relationship with Robert California (James Spader) will be far from professional. We're thrilled that she's joining the cast," said executive producer Paul Lieberstein.

    Tate's acting credits include the multi-award-winning BBC series, "The Catherine Tate Show," which showcased her chameleon-like talent for character transformation. In addition to playing Donna Noble (the Doctor's companion) in the 4th series of BBC's "Doctor Who." Tate also co-starred in the feature films "Gulliver's Travels," "Monte Carlo," "Mrs. Ratcliffe's Revolution," "66" and "Starter for Ten."

    Theatre work includes the lead role of Belinda in the National Theatre production "Season's Greetings" and Beatrice in the West End production of "Much Ado About Nothing," David Eldridge's "Under the Blue Sky," "Some Girls" and "A Servant to Two Masters" for the Royal Shakespeare Company. Tate wrote, directed and co-starred in the acclaimed short film "My First Nativity" for the Sky "Little Cracker's" season. In addition to being the key writer for her own series, Tate has a feature script currently in development.

    From Deedle-Dee Productions, Reveille and Universal Television comes the multi-award-winning comedy series "The Office," the hilarious documentary-style look into the humorous and sometimes poignant foolishness that plagues the world of 9-to-5 in the half-hour. A fly-on-the-wall "docu-reality" parody about modern American office life, "The Office" delves into the lives of the workers at Dunder Mifflin Sabre, a paper supply company in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

    "The Office" is executive-produced by Ben Silverman, Greg Daniels, who developed the series for American audiences, Ricky Gervais, Stephen Merchant, Howard Klein and Paul Lieberstein.

Offline nacho

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Re: Office 7: Transitions
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2011, 02:46:25 PM »
I'm so glad I've sworn off of this show.

Offline nacho

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Re: Office 7: Transitions
« Reply #19 on: November 07, 2011, 11:23:40 AM »
Man, Vulture's simply giving up on everything. I'm still avoiding the Office, and it sounds like I've made the right choice!



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There’s a formula for season eight of The Office. Robert California informs Andy that he must solve some problem, and Andy asks the office for ideas. Whatever strategy they concoct causes some high jinks that morph into a separate story arc. And at the end of the episode, though the original problem remains unsolved, California reappears to deliver an inspiring, if not coldly abrasive monologue.

Turns out the branch is inclined to make costly mistakes, and after all these years, Robert California would like Andy Bernard to fix everything — in one week. Impossible? Absolutely! But what are the odds anyone will actually be held accountable? We know this, obviously, but somehow Andy still hasn’t learned he could crack open a sarsaparilla and hold out for the climactic speech.

California disappears, on cue. Really, where does he go for the middle parts of these episodes? Does he fly back to Miami to perform his duties as CEO? Okay, conspiracy theory time: What if Robert California isn’t the CEO of Dunder Mifflin? What if he just told everyone that? Makes only slightly less sense than the new head of a company operating from its worst performing branch.

Moving on, if there’s one thing this episode (and the season) proves, it’s that Mr. Bernard isn’t currently up to snuff as a boss. The mopey middle manager is charming, like when he croons Everclear in the cold open, but he’s not productive, let alone assertive. The de facto leader of the episode is Dwight Schrute, who just so happens to have an elaborate mechanism for increasing productivity and eradicating error. Now, outside the television we know this idea will be catastrophic, but Andy is such a pushover, he green-lights the entire thing sight unseen.

Dwight’s plan is positively insane. In short, complex computer software will register every mistake made in the workspace. If the team makes five mistakes in a single day, the automated failsafe will forward an e-mail to Robert California containing last season’s consultant report (you know, the one that recommended the entire branch be shut down). He calls it the “Accountability Booster,” but Jim correctly points out what it really is: a doomsday device.

Okay, we’ve tagged along for some unbelievable high jinks this season: We nodded when Andy got an ass tattoo; we bit our cheek when Jim wrote and sold a book on garden parties; but the notion that Dwight Schrute could program a computer system — one that recognizes every mistake in the office, and thus, could presumably know how to fix said mistake but doesn’t — is a bridge too far.

The employees recognize that the beet farmer is a sociopath and freak out, rightly so. That doesn’t make them more efficient, nor does their trying, at the behest of Jim, to hack Dwight’s computer. In no time, five strikes accumulate, and everyone assumes that’s it. The e-mail’s been sent and they’re all doomed.

But no, not yet! Dwight announces the system won’t e-mail California till 5 p.m. on the dot, and the only way to stop it requires Dwight entering his password. For a brief moment, it appears Dwight has constructed the perfect blackmail. The employees will do anything to get that e-mail unsent. And yet, despite everything we know about this character, Dwight doesn’t seem to care about the windfall of power.

Away from the cubicles, Gabe and Darryl vie for the attention of Val, a new woman in the warehouse. I mentioned this last week: The women of The Office have taken to playing second fiddle, from the leads to the supporting roles. It’s disappointing how little Val has to do, other than play sexual target. Val doesn’t want to date a co-worker. Along with her three lines, she’s got morals.

Andy has one pseudo-active moment. He sends Jim to distract California, who is playing squash (so that’s what he does), while he and some others visit the Schrute family farm. Jim sucks at racquet sports and the gang sucks at talking Dwight off the ledge, but that’s okay. Pam, in all her pregnant glory, tells Andy not to push Dwight. And Dwight, of his own volition, cancels the e-mail.

It’s like we got too much of what we wished for. Andy is too indecisive, always turning to the gang for help solving a tough problem, while Dwight swings too far in the opposite direction, relying solely on himself. His decision to cancel the e-mail felt like it would have happened with or without the interference of his co-workers. Really, can you imagine him endangering not only his job, but the company he loves?

“Doomsday” isn’t as apocalyptically dull as last week’s episode. In fact, it is quite funny and has some genuine stakes. The problem is none of this matters when the ending just sort of happens. Like California said, the office is prone to error, and in this episode, no one bothered to fix it.

Offline RottingCorpse

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Re: Office 7: Transitions
« Reply #20 on: July 02, 2012, 07:48:34 PM »
Okay! Back to my entertainment news blackout.

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There’s an NBC spin-off pilot in the works titled “The Farm” that could evolve into a series that would follow “The Office” fixture Dwight Schrute as he runs the bed-and-breakfast on his beet farm.

Offline nacho

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Re: Office 7: Transitions
« Reply #21 on: July 03, 2012, 08:02:43 AM »
That's been "in the works" for four years.