Author Topic: BSG Season 4, linking webisodes, and the long-awaited season 4.5  (Read 111478 times)

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Offline nacho

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Re: BSG -- Season four
« Reply #15 on: June 04, 2007, 04:09:44 PM »
Yeah. 

Speaking of which, thanks to RC's thread, I'm very close to word filtering Babylon 5.

Offline nacho

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Re: BSG -- Season four
« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2007, 06:17:34 PM »
Oh.  According to rumors in TV IV, Kara's not a Cylon.  We're going to meet the last Cylon model (or the first, rather) next year. That's cool. 

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2007, 11:03:31 AM »
The pitiful new comic series already brought back the original Cylons, though not in flashback.  I kind of figured we'd be seeing them in the series, as well.

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Classic Cylons Returning To 'Battlestar Galactica'

The most famous version of "Battlestar Galactica's" Cylons -- you know, the shiny suits from the original 1970s series -- got nothing more than a short cameo appearance in the 2003 pilot miniseries.

But fans attending a special BSG event at Arclight Cinemas in Hollywood earlier this week say that the "By Your Command" Cylons are going to show more than just a dead helmet during the fourth and final season of the SciFi Channel series.

It's not quite clear why the older versions of the Cylons -- who were replaced by both CGI and humans for the new series -- will make their return, but there are reports that at least November's telemovie focusing on the Battlestar Pegasus will include flashbacks to the original human/Cylon war of 40 years before, reports the Collider Web site, and it's likely that's where the original Cylons will show up.

"Battlestar Galactica" executive producer Ronald D. Moore also took questions from the audience, and confirmed that he is writing a draft script for the proposed sequel to Will Smith's 2004 film "I Robot," and confirmed earlier reports that he is still involved in the remake of "The Thing."

The "Battlestar Galactica" telemovie, which is being called "Razor," will air in November on SciFi Channel, and be released almost instantly on DVD. The fourth season comes back in January or February.

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #18 on: June 12, 2007, 12:43:12 PM »
The ongoing BSG freakout!

Now that the end has been announced, the old battles are starting again.  Quiet and happy to cash checks since the mini-series, Larson comes back from the loony bin...

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Glen Larson In Control Of 'Battlestar Galactica's' Future

Years after a prolonged battle with Universal over intellectual property rights, Glen A. Larson may finally be once again the driver's seat of the Battlestar Galactica franchise.
With the SciFi Channel wrapping up the series run of its version of Larson's 1970s creation with "Battlestar Galactica's" fourth season next year, it will be up to Larson on whether or not the franchise sees a future on the big-screen, or even direct-to-DVD.

Larson, who has never called himself a fan of the Ronald D. Moore-developed reimagination of the series, continues to retain the motion picture rights to the franchise and series name, and it's not clear if he would be willing to waive some of those rights to let Edward James Olmos and crew to move to the big screen. But that doesn't mean producers for the show aren't going to try.

"We have to extend the olive branch," executive producer David Eick recently told IESB. "If that happens, you never know."

In the past, Larson has expressed an interest in bringing "Battlestar Galactica" to the screen as a continuation of the 1970s series using the original characters, but it's unclear if there has been any significant movement in putting such a big-screen adventure together.

In the meantime, Larson has been flexing his distribution rights muscle. SciFi Channel is forced to air the pre-fourth season telemovie "Razor" just days (if not hours) before it gets released on DVD so as not to interfere with Larson's non-television distribution rights.

"Razor" is expected to premiere in November before the fourth and final season of the critically acclaimed series returns to the SciFi Channel in early 2008.


Offline nacho

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #19 on: June 27, 2007, 11:40:00 AM »
Oh-ho!  Complaints.


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For Grace Park, playing a Cylon has been an amazing experience. But for the patriot Col. Saul Tigh, suddenly becoming part of the enemy hasn't been received with open arms.

Michael Hogan, who plays Tigh in "Battlestar Galactica," told reporters at SciFi Channel's digital press tour Tuesday that if it were up to him, Tigh would not have been revealed as one of the Final Five Cylons in the third season finale.

"I'm not happy about being a Cylon at all," Hogan told reporters at the event. "I'm not imagining that anyone who were picked to be Cylons are. The scripts that we have so far are great, but the only way that I can deal with it is as a human being, and so far that's [what my character] has had to do."

While he might not necessarily agree with the direction executive producers Ronald D. Moore and David Eick have taken Tigh, Hogan still says that it's very easy to talk to the showrunners, and the actors still have a strong avenue of being heard whenever they have concerns about anything.

"They have always been incredibly open as far as I'm concerned, for suggestions and ideas," Hogan said. "They will listen to you if you have an argument."

Aaron Douglas, who plays fan-favorite Chief Tyrol on the series, said he also had a difficult time accepting Galactica's "everyman" to be a Cylon ... but it was something he did eventually embrace.

"I found out months in advance, accidentally," Douglas said. "I found a piece of paper lying around that I was not supposed to read."

The paper, apparently, mentioned Tyrol being a Cylon, and was something that producer Michael Rymer was trying to keep quiet. When it became official, at least to the actors, on who would be revealed as part of the Final Five, Douglas said he had a very long conversation with Moore to express his concerns about turning Tyrol into a Cylon.

"I had felt it was really marginalizing him," Douglas said about his character. "It was taking away all the human stuff. Ron spoke to me for an hour-and-a-half and explained the whys and wherefores. I've [since] embraced it, and now I don't mind going down in history as one of the Cylon gods."

Keep reading SyFy Portal all week for all the latest on SciFi Channel's press tour in Vancouver, B.C., highlighting shows such as "Battlestar Galactica," "Stargate: Atlantis," "Eureka," "Flash Gordon" and more.

And weirdness:


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What happens when you merge "The 4400" and "Battlestar Galactica"? Apparently a very happy actor.

Billy Campbell, who plays the very popular near-messiah Jordan Collier on the hit USA Network series, has apparently told SciFi Channel studio head Bonnie Hammer that he wants a role on "Battlestar Galactica" that he would work for free.

"He literally assaulted me," Hammer told reporters with a laugh at Tuesday's digital media press tour on the set of "Battlestar Galactica." She said she ran into Campbell at the recent network upfronts where Campbell was pushing "The 4400."

"He was trying to do whatever he could to bribe me, to bribe [executive producers Ronald D. Moore and David Eick] to create a character arc for him on 'Battlestar Galactica,'" Hammer said. "That is the only show he said he ever wanted to be in, and he would do it for free. It's very hard to get away from that."

While the producers of BSG might not take the whole "free" thing seriously, they apparently are exploring ways on how they could include Campbell in the show, which is about five episodes into filming its fourth and final season.

Hammer insisted that despite media reports to the contrary, the decision to end "Battlestar Galactica" after its fourth season rested solely on Eick and Moore, since the network could not guarantee a fifth season until after they see numbers and such from the fourth season. Tahmoh Penikett, who plays Helo in the series, was practically moved to tears while talking about how the show was ending.

"It's going by way too quickly," Penikett said. "We're already going into our fifth episode, and it's been such a momentous growing experience for me. Regardless of what happens to me, I will look at this as one of the highlights of my career, and I'm going to miss it a lot."

Offline fajwat

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #20 on: June 27, 2007, 01:55:15 PM »
gah gah gah spoilers fuck.  why'd I do that.
"If it were up to me I would close Guantánamo not tomorrow but this afternoon... Essentially, we have shaken the belief that the world had in America's justice system... and it's causing us far more damage than any good we get from it."

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Offline nacho

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2007, 02:02:46 PM »
Yeah, read the season four thread while you work your way through season two, okay?

Offline Matt

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #22 on: June 30, 2007, 04:51:40 PM »
GET OUT FAJWAT




now that that's done. Notice the important phrasing of what Douglas said? HUGE spoiler there.

Offline nacho

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #23 on: June 30, 2007, 08:28:46 PM »
Yeah.  He slipped up pretty bad.  Now we know!

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #24 on: July 01, 2007, 12:33:00 AM »
so that's apparantly the blurring line: Cylon gods count as Cylons

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #25 on: July 09, 2007, 07:55:12 AM »
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There are dozens of ships that make up the ragtag fleet running from the Cylons in "Battlestar Galactica," and over the course of three seasons, only a small handful of those ships have even been visited.

The SciFi Channel series may be wrapping up its run in the fourth season, but that doesn't mean producers are ready to give up exploring other vessels, with the Galactica crew poised to step aboard a very cramped ship called the Demetrius by about the fifth or sixth episode of the season.

"Battlestar Galactica" production designer Richard Houdolin and art director Doug Maclean took online journalists on a tour of the Vancouver, B.C. sets used for the series last week as part of the SciFi Channel Digital Press Tour, which SyFy Portal was a part of. The tour included a small detour to a soundstage where the mess hall of a submarine-like ship was being constructed for use this week, but neither Houdolin or Maclean would go into detail with reporters on what exactly they were seeing or what the ship would be used for.

Some very observant members of the tour, however, noticed a blueprint laying nearby the construction project that identified the ship as the Demetrius.

The Demetrius, according to Battlestar Wiki, was mentioned in the second season episode "Lay Down Your Burdens, Part 2" in a list of ships providing vote tallies for the election between Laura Roslin (Mary McDonnell) and Gaius Baltar (James Callis). While the existing sets at the time of the tour were not clear on the function of the ship, Battlestar Wiki speculates that the name of the ship could be a reference to Demeter, the Greek goddess of grain and agriculture as well as the preserver of marriage and the sacred law. It is possible that the ship could be an agricultural one, but little information about the particular set outside of the visit was available.

Another stop on the tour for those of us attending was the standing sets used for the Cylon baseships, including the multi-purpose set that has been the backdrop of various rooms featured on the enemy vessels.

When the tour group went through a week ago, the multi-purpose set was designed as a fancy dining area complete with silver on the table and white chairs. The set, however, was practically in pieces, as it looked like there was a significant gun battle, with support pillars nearly destroyed and bullet holes everywhere.

Kenn Gold, a writer for Media Blvd., said whispers he heard on set were that the Centurion models will rebel early in Season 4 against the humanoid models after discovering their ability to maintain intelligent thought has been suppressed. Some of the Centurions, apparently, will have this inhibitor removed, and will confront the humanoid models during a dinner scene.

"From the debris scattered about, the numerous bullet holes in the walls, and the shattered glass of the conference room, it would appear that the Centurions are not very happy about being enslaved by these human Cylon masters, much as their ancestors were enslaved by the humans which lead to the first Cylon war," Gold said.

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Producers have said indirectly that the November direct-to-DVD "Battlestar Galactica" movie "Razor" will fill in some of the gaps in the franchise's timeline in terms of the Battlestar Pegasus, but don't expect the show's trip down memory lane to go back too far.

In fact, the main sequence of events in the telemovie will lead up to just before the presidential election and the settling on New Caprica, which took place at the end of Season 2.

"We cover a good period of time in this piece, a good 45 years or so," a source told SyFy Portal. "Not only will we get to see some interesting aspects of the original Cylon War, but we're also going to get to see some of Lee Adama's first days as commander of the Pegasus."

Many of the scenes will actually be a flashback from a point where Starbuck (Katee Sackhoff) and Kendra Shaw (Stephanie Chaves-Jacobsen) are sent on a mission that could end up providing some serious answers behind who the Cylons really are.

"Starbuck has no respect for Kendra at all, and sending them on this mission was a way for Apollo to get them to understand each other better," the source said. "They do end up understanding each other a lot more, but mainly because Kendra ends up confessing what we see in the movie to Starbuck."

Also, there has been a lot of speculation on the Web on what exactly "Razor" is in reference to. Is it someone's call sign? Will there be a lot of shaving?

The answer, however, is quite simple, the source said.

"It's basically someone who can make a difficult decision, possibly resulting in the death of someone, on the fly and when under pressure," the source said. "It's something that Cain (Michelle Forbes) tells Kendra before a very difficult incident that was only talked about during the Pegasus episodes last season."

Cain tells Kendra that she can be a "Razor" because "when you take your fear, your hesitation, even your revulsion ... every natural instinct that in battle can mean the difference between life and death, and lock them away. When you can be this, for as long as you have to be, then you are a Razor," Cain tells Kendra. "In this war, I'm afraid, we'll all have to be Razors, or we won't survive to have the luxury of simply being human again."

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #26 on: July 09, 2007, 01:45:32 PM »
:awesomelon:

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #27 on: July 11, 2007, 11:08:18 AM »
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The following story contains possible MAJOR SPOILERS for the fourth season of "Battlestar Galactica."

Those Centurions have been nothing more than walking/shooting toasters, but apparently it's not because the Cylons were too dumb to make them as smart (and beautiful) as their humanoid counterparts.

Last week, Media Blvd. shared some tidbits about the upcoming fourth season of "Battlestar Galactica" talking about how the Centurions never evolved much because the human Cylons built in inhibitors that prevented higher brain function.

Once that inhibitor is removed, the Centurions apparently open fire on the Cylon base ship, parts of which were seen by those attending the SciFi Channel Digital Press Tour last month in Vancouver, B.C., soon after parts of the scenes were shot.

But who were the Cylons targeting? SyFy Portal dug a little deeper, and a source tells us that the Centurions weren't firing out of anger ... it was actually a calculated political move.

"Word about the existence of the Final Five starts spreading throughout the Cylon fleet," the source told SyFy Portal. "Since they may be hiding among the Colonials, the Centurions -- who are now able to think for themselves -- decide they can no longer fire on the fleet at risk of putting the Final Five in trouble."

Four of the Final Five were revealed in the third season finale, and it's unclear what kind of resurrection abilities -- if any -- these final Cylons have. But keeping a military force is important, and one of the Cylon human models removes part of the Centurion Raiders' brain function to remove that independent thinking to make them attack anyway.

What results is the equivalent of a Cylon civil war, or in this case, a skirmish as the battle doesn't last long enough to be a civil war.

"We're going to lose some Cylons in this battle," the source said. "And I don't mean the toasters. We're actually going to lose some of our humanoid Cylons ... as in lose permanently."

The humanoid models are split on if they should continue attacking with the Final Five in the fleet, and when a vote doesn't go the way one Cylon wants it to, the order is given to completely annihilate three models. Attacking all of them at once, and eliminating their ability to resurrect.

There are unconfirmed reports that this episode also will feature the return of Lucy Lawless to the program, as there is some chatter that the actress has signed up for a similar contract she did in her limited run in Season 3. Also, another source reports that a new "named" Cylon will be introduced early in the fourth season, presenting yet another character for Tricia Helfer to play.

When reporters visited the set last month, the multi-purpose set was designed as a dinner area with pristine white chairs, and some extravagant crystal table settings. The room -- which has doubled as Baltar's holding cell as well as where the hybrid pilots are kept -- was riddled with bullet holes that pierced through pillars, and a wall behind where the reporters were walking through. Debris was strewn everywhere, and "Battlestar Galactica" set crew made sure nothing on the set was disturbed, as it was still a hot set.

Of course, none of this has been confirmed by SciFi Channel or showrunners, so please treat this as you would any other rumor.

Offline nacho

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #28 on: July 16, 2007, 10:56:27 AM »
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Did 'Battlestar Galactica' Kill Television?

As the Internet continues to make significant strides in gaining respectability among mainstream media, more and more attention has been focused on the true power of the World Wide Web.

Some of that power was felt just a couple weeks ago when Web-savvy viewers of the CBS series "Jericho" convinced the network they were not paying enough attention to how the show was being distributed through non-traditional means -- you know, the Internet -- and in the end, had vastly miscalculated the audience for the show. On top of that, the campaign to organize the "Save Jericho" campaign came almost completely through the Internet, and CBS is poised to return the show either later this year or early 2008.

Other genre shows, however, have tapped into the raw energy of the Internet, whether it be the well-marketed and fan-produced "Star Trek: New Voyages," or simply by accident like SciFi Channel's "Battlestar Galactica."

"Although live broadcasts are still big business, time-shifted video podcasts have exploded the myth that the value of video resides in when people view them," wrote Wired blogger Adario Strange in a recent column.

That was proved by the first season of "Battlestar Galactica." Because of a partnership SciFi Channel made with British satellite company Sky One, the first 13 episodes of the series were aired across the pond, forcing American audiences to wait months. Well, OK ... audiences that didn't realize the episodes were available online -- albeit unlawfully -- and knew how to download them.

"For months, viewers in the [United States] downloaded the show illegally via torrents," Strange said. "The vibrant conversation in the [United States] regarding the show lasted months as time-shifted episodes trickled in from Europe one-by-one. The value of all those time-shifted Internet views created the hype that made the show a success in the [United States], not simultaneous viewings."

Strange was responding to an analysis made by HDNet executive Mark Cuban who claimed, among other things, that the "more people that see content when it is originally 'broadcast,' regardless of the distribution medium, the more valuable the content" as well as "the greater number of people that watch content simultaneously, the greater the emotional attachment of the viewer."

Instead of ignoring this, many alternative platform observers have called on networks to find ways of utilizing such available media rather than panning it. Mark Pesce, the co-creator of the Virtual Reality Modeling Language -- or VRML -- shared the missed opportunity in a blog post as far back as 2005, especially when it came to the first season of "Battlestar Galactica."

"While you might assume the SciFi Channel saw a significant dropoff in viewership as a result of this piracy, it appears to have had the reverse effect: The series is so good that the few tens of thousands of people who watched downloaded versions told their friend to tune in on Jan. 14 [2005] and see for themselves," Pesce wrote. "We all understand that this piracy is technically illegal, technically a violation of copyright, but we're in a hell of a bind if we're telling the audience to sit down, shut up and do as you're told when it comes to television viewing."

In fact, Pesce argued at the time, production companies and even networks can introduce sort of a faux-product placement in such feeds with something as simple as an advertising logo bug on the corner of the screen, or other sorts of paid advertising to turn the market from one of piracy to one where real revenue can be generated.

"The idea of an advertising payload attached unobtrusively to the television program has a certain appeal," Pesce said. "It can be ignored, but it's always present. The audience can't edit it out of the program without destroying the content of the program. Audiences will learn [to] accept them -- so long as the advertisements aren't too busy, distracting or otherwise obnoxious."

Producers also can find ways of embedding advertising into the programming itself.

None of this is new, as sponsored programming has been the way of commercial television for decades. But such a model could change how shows are distributed, and who the middle-men are.

"Today, the broadcaster aggregates audiences, aggregates advertisers, puts commercials into the program breaks, and makes a lot of money doing this," Pesce said. "But -- and here is the central point I'm making today -- wouldn't it be economically more efficient for the advertiser to work directly with the program's producer to distribute television programming directly to the audience?"

Whatever producers and studios do, they need to jump on the bandwagon soon, Wired's Strange said.

"The video game has changed," he said, referring to the distribution model of television programming and production. "Having a lot of cash to spend on expensive cameras and flashy studios is no longer as important as it once was. Some media barons aren't ready to accept this. [And] yes, I'm talking about Cuban."

For Adario Strange's complete column at the Wired Web site, click here. To read Mark Pesce's May 2005 blog entry about finding ways to monetize alternative distribution of programs, click here.

Offline Matt

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Re: BSG -- The long wait for season four
« Reply #29 on: July 18, 2007, 02:44:57 PM »
What I liked about Battlestar is that it was pretty much impossible to put product placement ads in it.