Author Topic: dying alone  (Read 33443 times)

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Offline nacho

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Re: dying alone
« Reply #75 on: January 16, 2011, 11:25:02 AM »
Shi-fucking-ver.

Offline nacho

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Re: dying alone
« Reply #76 on: May 03, 2011, 08:35:39 AM »
Well... Instead of using the "obit lineup" thread, this one can go here...because holy shit...


Quote
Sad news hit the web tonight, as police are reporting they found the body of actress Yvette Vickers in her L.A.'s Benedict Canyon home last week. The B-movie actress, known for her roles in Attack Of The 50-Foot Woman and Attack Of The Giant Leeches (both of which I saw more times than I can remember during my childhood), was discovered in a mummified state (the body suggests she has been dead for nearly a year. Yikes!) by a neighbor "after noticing old letters and spiderwebs in her mailbox." Although the cause of her death is unknown, police don't suspect foul play. She was 82. Check past the break for trailers of the aforementioned flicks.

http://gawker.com/#!5797998/1950s-playmate-found-mummified-inside-home

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Former Playboy Playmate and B-movie star Yvette Vickers was found in a "mummified state" inside her Benedict Canyon, California home by a neighbor last week. Authorities tell the Los Angeles Times that she could have been dead for up to a year. Susan Savage found Vickers' body after noticing yellowed mail and cobwebs: "I just had a bad feeling," she told the paper.

The inside of the home was in disrepair and it was hard to move through the rooms because boxes containing what appeared to be clothes, junk mail and letters formed barriers, Savage said. Eventually, she made her way upstairs and found a room with a small space heater still on.

She was looking at a cordless phone that appeared to have been knocked off its cradle when she first saw the body on the floor, she said. Savage had known Vickers but the remains were unrecognizable, she said.

Aside from being Playboy Playmate of the Month in July, 1959, Vickers appeared in Attack of the Giant Leeches and Attack of the 50-Foot Woman. She also appeared on many television shows for several decades. She was 82.

More at the LA Times:

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2011/05/early-playboy-playmate-and-b-movie-acress-yvette-vickers-found-dead-in-benedict-canyon.html

The neighbor not noticing for a year makes a little more sense. These houses weren't on top of each other:

Quote
Susan Savage, an actress, went to check on Vickers after noticing old letters and cobwebs in her elderly neighbor's mailbox.

"The letters seemed untouched and were starting to yellow," Savage said. "I just had a bad feeling."

After pushing open a barricaded front gate and scaling a hillside, Savage peered through a broken window with another piece of glass taped over the hole. She decided to enter the house after seeing a shock of blond hair, which turned out to be a wig.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2011, 08:39:21 AM by nacho »

Offline RottingCorpse

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Re: dying alone
« Reply #77 on: May 19, 2011, 11:45:13 PM »
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Woman's quest for missing dad leads to Utah desert

SALT LAKE CITY – It was supposed to be Kenneth Schneider's goodbye to the world, the last solo road trip the 78-year-old would take, from Washington state back to his native Utah.

No one knows just how or why the trip ended as abruptly as it did. But, more than five years later, as she clutched her father's skull in the harsh southern Utah desert, Leslie Schneider finally felt an odd catharsis and relief that her family's own emotional quest for answers also had come to an end.

"I was holding this small skull that was supposed to be my dad and trying to make a connection," Schneider said, recalling her help last month turning up her father's remains after a hiker's grisly discovery reopened the missing persons case. "To be there to be a part of that experience was such a privilege and it was amazing how much we found ... It was a complete shock."

Family members weren't concerned when Schneider set out on his journey in his beat-up Nissan Sentra in October 2005. He knew Utah well.

The World War II veteran meandered through Oregon, California, Nevada and finally across Utah to Canyonlands National Park, where he ran into trouble. San Juan County authorities found his car on a dusty road in Cottonwood Canyon near the park. He'd left a note saying he was walking to a ranch about eight miles away. He was never heard from again.

Crews scoured the area for days, using helicopters, horses and dogs but didn't turn up any clues. The search was eventually called off. His family back in Seattle didn't know what to think.

"We had considered foul play, but I don't think any of us believed that," said Mari Schneider, one of his five children. "I had even thought that it could have been suicide because this trip was like his goodbye to the world. He had visited with fellow veteran soldiers in Las Vegas ... Many of them said he didn't look well."

Over the years, his children figured the mystery would never be solved, that their dad would remain just another missing person.
"We had pretty much lost all hope of finding him and even though we had a memorial, nothing ever felt complete," Mari Schneider said.
Then came that telephone call about a month ago. A hiker found a skull in the desert near the spot where the man's car had been abandoned years earlier.

Sheriff's Deputy J.J. Bradford thoughts immediately turned to Kenneth Schneider, whose missing-person photo still hangs in his office. As he prepared to mount another search, the sheriff called Leslie Schneider.

"When I first heard they were looking for my dad, there was a voice in my head that said, `I don't just want other people picking up his bones, I want to be there,'" she said. "That probably sounds bizarre to most people, it's your dad and these are his skeletal remains, but it was really important to me."

So she hopped on a plane with her partner and 14-year-old son and headed for Utah.

After they arrived at Cottonwood Canyon on April 16 and met up with Bradford, she held the skull and tried to come to grips.

She joined the search team, searching the dry sagebrush and scrub scattered across a valley beneath towering red rock cliffs. She tried to imagine why her father would have descended from the steep, rocky ledges where his car was found, and how he died out there.
What were his last moments like? A thunderstorm hit the first evening Ken Schneider would have been alone in the canyon. She hoped he didn't suffer or freeze. She prayed his death was swift, perhaps a heart attack.

They fanned out across the area, looking for any more clues. Then someone pointed to a piece of fabric.

"Sure enough, it totally looked like my dad's shirt," Leslie Schneider said.

Her son found the first bone, a piece of an arm. Others came across more scraps of clothing, her dad's wallet with his driver's license and library card, remnants of a notebook he always carried with him. And his watch, the Timex he always wore.

"It was a shock because I didn't think it was going to be so easy to find stuff. The skull was emotional but it wasn't like I immediately felt my dad's presence," she said. "But I really did when I saw the watch ... It was just so him. That was him just as much as the wallet was, because it was so familiar, that distinctive watch style. Finding the wallet was huge. You could read his name, so seeing his name on something there was amazing."

She broke down in tears, then kept looking. Throughout the daylong search, they uncovered more skeletal remains. A tattered hat found a few days earlier was the one her dad received at a 50th reunion of fellow Marines who were with him during the invasion of Japan.
As Leslie Schneider stood in the desert sun, her father's bones scattered out on a blue tarp, it struck her how bizarre it all was.

"It's like you're watching a movie of your life or something, you're just asking yourself, `How did I get to this place?'" she said. "It's just so outside the realm of what most people expect to have happen in their lives."

A medical examiner will soon be reviewing the bones for any injuries while trying to determine a cause of death, but for now, the experience has brought the family closure they never thought they'd find.

They plan to return, all the children, in August to resume the search for the rest of their dad, his lower jaw bone, hands and feet, and to gather for one final goodbye.

"We all loved him madly," Mari Schneider said. "What a most perfect ending to a life, he was at home and in the desert."

Offline nacho

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Re: dying alone
« Reply #78 on: May 19, 2011, 11:52:50 PM »
You know, I hope I never end up dying in a way where I'm discovered because some dog comes running out of the bushes with my femur or something.

You know...like Chandra!

Offline RottingCorpse

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Re: dying alone
« Reply #79 on: August 10, 2011, 07:49:55 PM »
This thread seemed appropriate for the below story.

Quote
Wis. man hides mom's body, collects monthly checks

Investigators believe a 67-year-old man concealed his mother's decomposing body at their home in rural northwestern Wisconsin for years so he could continue to receive her monthly social security checks.

Deputies went to the house in Washburn County in June after a postal worker contacted authorities because mail had not been collected. WQOW-TV (http://bit.ly/qnwecS ) reported Wednesday that they found Michael Egan's body on a bedroom floor. He had been dead for more than a week.

Cadaver dogs later found the remains of his mother, Elizabeth, on a couch under rags, sleeping bags and plastic.

"It appears Elizabeth had been deceased for quite some time and that her son, Michael Egan, was mixing a solution and then soaking the rags and putting the rags on top of the body," according to police records.

Bank officials told authorities that Elizabeth's monthly social security check was directly deposited in the bank for years, including one for $1,128 in June. Investigators believe that Michael Egan had been using her account for years.

Investigators said there was very little decay of the body because the towels had a solution on them that helped preserve it.

Authorities don't know how long Elizabeth Egan had been dead but say she was last seen in 2005 when she was 95 years old.

Offline nacho

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Re: dying alone
« Reply #80 on: August 10, 2011, 08:59:02 PM »
Well, you know... Good for him.

Offline Cassander

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Re: dying alone
« Reply #81 on: August 11, 2011, 11:57:23 PM »
If the tea party started going after this kind of social security fraudulence, I'd toss my hat in with them.
You ain't a has been if you never was.

Offline nacho

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Re: dying alone
« Reply #82 on: August 31, 2012, 10:46:39 AM »
http://www.thevillager.com/?p=7172

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Shulamith Firestone, a pioneering feminist who shot to fame at age 25 with her best-selling book, “The Dialectic of Sex,” was found dead in her East Village apartment on Tuesday. She was 67.

Alerted by neighbors, who had smelled a strong odor from her apartment, her superintendent peered in through a window from the fire escape and saw her body on the floor. Her landlord, Bob Perl, said she had probably been dead about a week. He said her one-bedroom unit included rows of books, including Greek classics.

Suffering from mental illness, she had shut herself off from contact with other people. Perl said the cause of death is unclear at this point — police said it wasn’t starvation — and that the coroner’s report should provide an answer.

Perl purchased the building, 213 E. 10th St., in 1993, and figures Firestone lived there, on the fifth floor, for about 30 years.

“She was not well for many years,” Perl said, noting that her family members and “strangers” would pay her rent when she was unable to. “She was a prodigy. But she had been ill for so many years, she lost contact with the outside world.”

Firestone grew up in an Orthodox Jewish family in Ottawa, Canada. According to Perl, she leaves at least two sisters, one of whom, Tirzah Firestone, is a rabbi in Boulder, Colorado.

Published in 1970, her “The Dialectic of Sex” was a key feminist work that presaged today’s issues surrounding birth and science. The book influenced her feminist contemporaries as well as those who followed behind her.

“No one can understand how feminism has evolved without reading this radical, inflammatory, second-wave landmark,” said Naomi Wolf.

According to Amazon.com, “The book synthesizes the work of Freud, Marx, de Beauvoir and Engels to create a cogent argument for feminist revolution. Identifying women as a caste, she declares that they must seize the means of reproduction — for as long as women (and only women) are required to bear and rear children, they will be singled out as inferior.”

According to Wikipedia, “She advocated the use of cybernetics to carry out human reproduction in laboratories as well as the proliferation of contraception, abortion and state support for child-rearing; enabling [women] to escape their biologically determined positions in society. Firestone described pregnancy as ‘barbaric’… . Among the reproductive technologies she predicted were sex selection and in vitro fertilization.”

Firestone wrote in “The Dialectic of Sex”: “…[J]ust as to assure elimination of economic classes requires the revolt of the underclass (the proletariat) and, in a temporary dictatorship, their seizure of the means of production, so…the elimination of sexual classes requires the revolt of the underclass (women) and the seizure of control of reproduction… . The reproduction of the species by one sex for the benefit of both would be replaced by (at least the option of) artificial reproduction: … [T]he dependence of the child on the mother (and vice versa) would give way to a greatly shortened dependence on a small group of others in general… . The division of labour would be ended by the elimination of labour altogether (through cybernetics). The tyranny of the biological family would be broken.”

One of her few friends in her later years was Lourdes Lopez, who met her about 10 years ago through a mutual friend. Lopez, a Lower East Side native, is a human resources administrator at Columbia. She said she enjoyed going to movies and museums with Firestone.

“She was very down to earth,” she said, noting that Firestone painted people who were close to her.

“She was isolated at the end and had changed her locks,” Lopez said. “We tried to get Mobile Crisis in there. She pretty much, because of her illness, cut off people. I was really pretty much the only person she trusted at the end as her illness took over. Between hospital stays, we would hang out for a few months until she went off her medication,” and then the process would repeat, Lopez said.

She said Firestone was paranoid-schizophrenic, as far as she knew, and had been hospitalized many times over the years.

Nevertheless, “She did write two other books and continued to paint,” she said.

Lopez is openly lesbian. As for Firestone, she said, “Honestly, she was never really tied to anyone,” and never spoke of her own sexual orientation.

Offline nacho

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Re: dying alone
« Reply #83 on: March 25, 2014, 05:51:34 PM »
Quote
(Reuters) - The corpse of a 66-year-old German woman who died more than six months ago was found in her apartment, in front of a television set that was still on, the Frankfurter Neue Presse newspaper reported on Tuesday.

The woman, in the town of Oberursel near Frankfurt, died of natural causes in a nightgown while watching TV. There was a program guide from September nearby, the newspaper said, describing the body as "partially mummified".

Police said residents in the 30-apartment block had noticed an unpleasant smell in the staircase but no one had informed the authorities. The landlord opened the apartment after noticing the her mailbox jammed with uncollected letters.

Offline nacho

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Re: dying alone
« Reply #84 on: October 02, 2017, 11:04:09 AM »
We've had a rash of these sort of stories...my new fear!

One guy died in his truck in an airport parking lot...and his body was in there for 8 months before they found him:

http://nypost.com/2017/09/18/dead-man-sat-in-truck-at-airport-parking-lot-for-eight-months-and-no-one-noticed/


And another guy died and sat for days in his car at White Flint:

http://www.bethesdamagazine.com/Bethesda-Beat/2017/Police-Identify-Dead-Man-Found-in-Car-in-White-Flint-Plaza-Parking-Lot/


Offline RottingCorpse

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Re: dying alone
« Reply #85 on: October 02, 2017, 12:06:19 PM »
The older I get, the more I think just clocking out in the Wal-Mart parking lot may not be all thatbad.