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Children of the Sun => Newsday => Topic started by: nacho on May 30, 2008, 07:26:46 AM

Title: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 30, 2008, 07:26:46 AM
Instead of multiple threads, or the no topic thread, let's give dead famous people their own thread!  Today's death is the great Harvey Korman:


Quote
LOS ANGELES - Harvey Korman, the tall, versatile comedian who won four Emmys for his outrageously funny contributions to "The Carol Burnett Show" and on the big screen in "Blazing Saddles," died Thursday. He was 81.

Korman died at UCLA Medical Center after suffering complications from the rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm four months ago, his family said in a statement released by the hospital.

His daughter, Kate Korman, said in the statement that it was a "miracle" that her father had survived the aneurysm at all, and that he had several major operations.

"Tragically, after such a hard fought battle he passed away," she said.

A natural second banana, Korman gained attention on "The Danny Kaye Show," appearing in skits with the star. He joined the show in its second season in 1964 and continued until it was canceled in 1967. That same year he became a cast member in the first season of "The Carol Burnett Show."

Burnett and Korman developed into the perfect pair with their burlesques of classic movies such as "Gone With the Wind" and soap operas like "As the World Turns" (their version was called "As the Stomach Turns").

Another recurring skit featured them as "Ed and Eunice," a staid married couple who were constantly at odds with the wife's mother (a young Vickie Lawrence in a gray wig). In "Old Folks at Home," they were a combative married couple bedeviled by Lawrence as Burnett's troublesome young sister.

Burnett was devastated by the news, said her assistant, Angie Horejsi.

"She loved Harvey very much," Horejsi said. She said Burnett had not yet made a statement.

Korman revealed the secret to the long-running show's success in a 2005 interview.

"We were an ensemble, and Carol had the most incredible attitude. I've never worked with a star of that magnitude who was willing to give so much away."

After 10 successful seasons, he left in 1977 for his own series. Dick Van Dyke took his place, but the chemistry was lacking and the Burnett show was canceled two years later. "The Harvey Korman Show" also failed, as did other series starring the actor.

"It takes a certain type of person to be a television star," he said in that 2005 interview. "I didn't have whatever that is. I come across as kind of snobbish and maybe a little too bright. ... Give me something bizarre to play or put me in a dress and I'm fine."

His most memorable film role was as the outlandish Hedley Lamarr (who was endlessly exasperated when people called him Hedy) in Mel Brooks' 1974 Western satire, "Blazing Saddles."

He also appeared in the Brooks comedies "High Anxiety," "The History of the World Part I" and "Dracula: Dead and Loving It," as well as two "Pink Panther" moves, "Trail of the Pink Panther" in 1982 and "Curse of the Pink Panther" in 1983.

Korman's other films included "Gypsy," "Huckleberry Finn" (as the King), "Herbie Goes Bananas" and "Bud and Lou" (as legendary straightman Bud Abbott to Buddy Hackett's Lou Costello). He also provided the voice of Dictabird in the 1994 live-action feature "The Flintstones."

In television, Korman guest-starred in dozens of series including "The Donna Reed Show," "Dr. Kildare," "Perry Mason," "The Wild Wild West," "The Muppet Show," "The Love Boat," "The Roseanne Show" and "Burke's Law."

In their '70s, he and Tim Conway, one of his Burnett show co-stars, toured the country with their show "Tim Conway and Harvey Korman: Together Again." They did 120 shows a year, sometimes as many as six or eight in a weekend.

Harvey Herschel Korman was born Feb. 15, 1927, in Chicago. He left college for service in the U.S. Navy, resuming his studies afterward at the Goodman School of Drama at the Chicago Art Institute. After four years, he decided to try New York.

"For the next 13 years I tried to get on Broadway, on off-Broadway, under or beside Broadway," he told a reporter in 1971.

He had no luck and had to support himself as a restaurant cashier. Finally, in desperation, he and a friend formed a nightclub comedy act.

"We were fired our first night in a club, between the first and second shows," he recalled.

After returning to Chicago, Korman decided to try Hollywood, reasoning that "at least I'd feel warm and comfortable while I failed."

For three years he sold cars and worked as a doorman at a movie theater. Then he landed the job with Kaye.

In 1960 Korman married Donna Elhart and they had two children, Maria and Christopher. They divorced in 1977. Two more children, Katherine and Laura, were born of his 1982 marriage to Deborah Fritz.

In addition to his daughter Kate, he is survived by his wife and the three other children.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 02, 2008, 01:18:37 PM
Bo Diddley!

Quote
Rock pioneer Bo Diddley dies at age 79

8 minutes ago

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — A spokeswoman says rock pioneer Bo Diddley has died. He was 79.

The spokeswoman says Diddley died of heart failure Monday. He had suffered a heart attack in August 2007, three months after suffering a stroke while touring in Iowa.

Doctors said the stroke affected his ability to speak, and he had returned to Florida to continue rehabilitation.

Diddley was known for his homemade square guitar, dark glasses and black hat.

His first single, "Bo Diddley," introduced record buyers in 1955 to his signature rhythm: bomp ba-bomp bomp, bomp bomp, often summarized as "shave and a haircut, two bits." The B side, "I'm a Man," with its slightly humorous take on macho pride, also became a rock standard.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 03, 2008, 10:49:39 AM
Not dead yet...but, while you slept, Senator Byrd was hospitalized and Kelsey Grammer had a heart attack.  Both are still with us.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 03, 2008, 12:39:39 PM
What do you think happens if Byrd dies? West Virginia might just secede.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 03, 2008, 12:51:37 PM
Especially after Cheney's joke.  They almost left the Union before Byrd hit the hospital.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on June 03, 2008, 02:41:56 PM
I had to look up the joke:
http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story?section=news/national_world&id=6181910
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 08, 2008, 09:29:45 AM
Quote
'Wonderful Life' actor Bob Anderson dies

   
LOS ANGELES, California (AP) -- Bob Anderson, who played the young George Bailey in the Christmas classic "It's a Wonderful Life," has died. He was 75.

Anderson died Friday of cancer at his home in Palm Springs, his wife, Victoria, said Saturday.

Robert J. Anderson grew up in a Hollywood family. His father, Gene, was an assistant director and later a production manager. His uncles were directors William Beaudine and James Flood, and his brothers and cousins were editors and production managers.

Anderson was introduced to films when relatives arranged for him to appear in a movie scene that called for a baby, his wife said.

He was 7 when he appeared in the 1940 Shirley Temple film "Young People" and went on to play roles in such films as 1945's "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn."

But he was best known for his role as the young Bailey in Frank Capra's 1946 "It's a Wonderful Life," the same character portrayed in adulthood by James Stewart. In one scene, the story called for him to spot a potentially fatal error made by a drunken druggist, played by H.B. Warner.

Warner took the role seriously and on the day of shooting had been drinking and was "pretty ripe," Victoria Anderson said. The scene called for Warner's character to slap the boy.

Anderson told the Los Angeles Times in 1996 that the scene and its rehearsals were painful.

"He actually bloodied my ear," Anderson told the paper. "My ear was beat up and my face was red, and I was in tears."

"At the end when it was all over, he (Warner) was very lovable. He grabbed me and hugged me, and he meant it," Anderson said.

Anderson enlisted in the Navy during the Korean War, serving as a photographer on aircraft carriers, his wife said.

After the war, he spent four decades in the movie industry. From the 1950s through the 1990s he worked steadily, rising from second assistant director to production manager for movies and TV shows, his wife said.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 13, 2008, 07:05:58 PM
NBC's Tim Russert died today at 58. Heart attack. Sad.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Matt on June 13, 2008, 07:13:38 PM
yeah, it's a pretty big shocker.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on June 14, 2008, 03:08:01 PM
people up here are talking about it.  Example of two conversations so far:

Codder: "Where are you from?"
me: "DC"
Codder: "Oh, I'm so sorry about Tim Russert.  It's so sad, isn't it?"
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 16, 2008, 05:19:57 PM
Might not mean so much to anybody but hardcore genre fans, but take a look at the creatures and FX Stan Winston created and you'll see even the most casual movie fan likely saw his work.

Quote from: Fangoria
RIP Stan Winston

Variety confirmed details about the death last night of makeup and FX master Stan Winston at age 62. Winston succumbed to multiple myeloma, which he’d been fighting for seven years, at his home, surrounded by family.

Winston began his career in the 1970s, toiling on B-pictures like THE BAT PEOPLE, DR. BLACK, MR. HYDE and MANSION OF THE DOOMED, and more notably on TV productions such as GARGOYLES, THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MISS JANE PITTMAN (both of which won him Emmys) and ROOTS. He got the first of nine Oscar nominations for his robot creations in 1981’s HEARTBEEPS, but it was his work for director James Cameron on THE TERMINATOR that vaulted him into the big leagues, and in rapid succession he amassed major credits including Cameron’s ALIENS (his first Oscar win), John McTiernan’s PREDATOR, Tim Burton’s EDWARD SCISSORHANDS (both of those got him nominations) and Fred Dekker’s cult favorite THE MONSTER SQUAD. He made his directorial debut with 1988’s PUMPKINHEAD.

Winston was one of the most prominent FX artists of the 1990s, winning two more Academy Awards for Cameron’s TERMINATOR 2: JUDGMENT DAY and Steven Spielberg’s JURASSIC PARK and nominations for Burton’s BATMAN FOREVER and Spielberg’s THE LOST WORLD: JURASSIC PARK and A.I.: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE. (He was also the first person to accept a Fango Chainsaw Award for Best Makeup FX, for his T2 illusions.) Winston branched out into producing on such features as WRONG TURN, last year’s THE DEATHS OF IAN STONE and the CREATURE FEATURES series of AIP remakes for cable. And he served as mentor to numerous other makeup and creature creators, most notably Alec Gillis and Tom Woodruff Jr., who succeeded him on the later ALIEN features. Last year, his contributions to cinema were celebrated in the massive Titan Books tome THE WINSTON EFFECT: THE ART & HISTORY OF STAN WINSTON STUDIO, and the many facets of his career are also covered at www.stanwinston.com.

Winston received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2001 (pictured)—only the second FX artist to receive that honor. Most recently, he created the physical suits worn by Robert Downey Jr. in the title role of IRON MAN, and was encoring on TERMINATOR SALVATION: THE FUTURE BEGINS. Fango laments the passing of one of the genre’s greats. —Michael Gingold
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 16, 2008, 09:31:35 PM
Might not mean so much to anybody but hardcore genre fans, but take a look at the creatures and FX Stan Winston created and you'll see even the most casual movie fan likely saw his work.

Holy shit... Tim Russert was a blow, for sure... I was a big fan, but I actually went to middle school with Stan Winston's nephew, so his name is very familiar to me as well.  Unreal.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 01, 2008, 08:13:49 PM
Don Davis....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_S._Davis

Very sad.  File under Twin Peaks and Stargate for this one. (And, I swear, there is a connection between the two characters.  The common SG-1 cover story in the first few seasons is what Major Briggs was in charge of in Twin Peaks.)

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on July 01, 2008, 09:41:49 PM
that connection sounds neat

i never watched enough of TP or SG1.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Matt on July 01, 2008, 10:46:57 PM
That guy was pretty cool.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 01, 2008, 11:02:17 PM
I'm actually strangely upset by Davis' death...

From the Atlantis showrunner's blog:

http://josephmallozzi.wordpress.com/2008/07/01/july-1-2008-in-memory-of-don-s-davis/

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Sirharles on July 02, 2008, 10:05:41 AM
Oddly enough I am too. 

Never saw the second season of TP, at least that I remember, but I really enjoyed his role on SG-1.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 02, 2008, 10:26:55 AM
Wow, pretty gifted, too.  Here's his art:

http://www.donsdavisart.com/
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Sirharles on July 02, 2008, 10:46:37 AM
I was looking at other SG-1 actors websites and only Michael Shanks even mentions his passing. 


Odd.

Of course Christopher Judge and RDA don't have "official" websites.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 02, 2008, 10:49:47 AM
Well, navigating Amanda Tapping's website is like trying to use Windows 3.1.  And I like to think RDA is living in a shack in the woods and shoots at people who pull into his driveway. 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 02, 2008, 10:57:43 PM
Kermit Love... One of the minds behind the MUppets.

http://blog.wired.com/underwire/2008/07/big-bird-builde.html
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on July 02, 2008, 11:27:15 PM
wow.  that's huge.  and sad.

I had no idea he was Snuggle.  that puts a different spin on my memories.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 04, 2008, 02:24:32 PM
Quote
Former Republican N.C. Sen. Jesse Helms dies at 86

RALEIGH, N.C. - Former Sen. Jesse Helms, who built a career along the fault lines of racial politics and battled liberals, Communists and the occasional fellow Republican during 30 conservative years in Congress, died on the Fourth of July. He was 86.

"It's just incredible that he would die on July 4, the same day of the Declaration of Independence and the same day that Thomas Jefferson and John Adams died, and he certainly is a patriot in the mold of those great men," said former North Carolina GOP Rep. Bill Cobey, the chairman of The Jesse Helms Center at Wingate University.

Helms died at 1:15 a.m, the center said. He died in Raleigh of natural causes, said former chief of staff Jimmy Broughton.

"He was very comfortable," Broughton said.

Funeral arrangements were pending, the Helms center said.

"America lost a great public servant and true patriot today," White House spokesman Scott Stanzel said.

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said few senators could match Helms' reputation.

"Today we lost a Senator whose stature in Congress had few equals. Senator Jesse Helms was a leading voice and courageous champion for the many causes he believed in," McConnell said in a statement.

Helms, who first became known to North Carolina voters as a newspaper and television commentator, won election to the Senate in 1972 and decided not to run for a sixth term in 2002.

"Compromise, hell! ... If freedom is right and tyranny is wrong, why should those who believe in freedom treat it as if it were a roll of bologna to be bartered a slice at a time?" Helms wrote in a 1959 editorial that foretold his political style.

As he aged, Helms was slowed by a variety of illnesses, including a bone disorder, prostate cancer and heart problems, and he made his way through the Capitol on a motorized scooter as his career neared an end. In April 2006, his family announced he had been moved into a convalescent center after being diagnosed with vascular dementia, in which repeated minor strokes damage the brain.

Helms' public appearances had dwindled as his health deteriorated. When his memoirs were published in August 2005, he appeared at a Raleigh book store to sign copies, but did not make a speech.

In an e-mail interview with The Associated Press at that time, Helms said he hoped what future generations learn about him "will be based on the truth and not the deliberate inaccuracies those who disagreed with me took such delight in repeating."

"My legacy will be up to others to describe," he added.

Helms served as chairman of the Agriculture Committee and Foreign Relations Committees over the years at times when the GOP held the Senate majority, using his posts to protect his state's tobacco growers and other farmers and place his stamp on foreign policy.

His opposition to Communism defined his foreign policy views. He took a dim view of many arms control treaties, opposed Fidel Castro at every turn, and supported the contras in Nicaragua as well as the right-wing government of El Salvador. He opposed the Panama Canal treaties that then-President Carter pushed through a reluctant Senate in 1977.

Early on, his habit of blocking nominations and legislation won him a nickname of "Senator No." He delighted in forcing roll-call votes that required Democrats to take politically difficult votes on federal funding for art he deemed pornographic, school busing, flag-burning and other cultural issues.

In 1993, when then-President Clinton sought confirmation for an openly homosexual assistant secretary at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Helms registered his disgust. "I'm not going to put a lesbian in a position like that," he said in a newspaper interview at the time. "If you want to call me a bigot, fine."

After Democrats killed the appointment of U.S. District Judge Terrence Boyle, a former Helms aide, to a federal appeals court post in 1991, Helms blocked all of Clinton's judicial nominations from North Carolina for eight years. Helms occasionally opted for compromise in later years in the Senate, working with Democrats on legislation to restructure the foreign policy bureaucracy and pay back debts to the United Nations, an organization be disdained for most of his career.

And he softened his views on AIDS after years of clashes with gay activists, advocating greater federal funding to fight the disease in Africa and elsewhere overseas.

But in his memoirs, Helms made clear that his opinions on other issues had hardly moderated since he left office. He likened abortion to the Holocaust and the Sept. 11 terror attacks.

"I will never be silent about the death of those who cannot speak for themselves," he wrote in "Here's Where I Stand."

Helms never lost a race for the Senate, but he never won one by much, either, a reflection of his divisive political profile in his native state.

He knew it, too. "Well, there is no joy in Mudville tonight. The mighty ultraliberal establishment, and the liberal politicians and editors and commentators and columnists have struck out again," he said in 1990 after winning his fourth term.

He won the 1972 election after switching parties, and defeated then-Gov. Jim Hunt in an epic battle in 1984 in what was then the costliest Senate race on record.

He defeated black former Charlotte Mayor Harvey Gantt in 1990 and 1996 in racially tinged campaigns. In the first race, a Helms commercial showed a white fist crumbling up a job application, these words underneath: "You needed that job ... but they had to give it to a minority."

"The tension that he creates, the fear he creates in people, is how he's won campaigns," Gantt said several years later.

Helms also played a role in national GOP politics — supporting Ronald Reagan in 1976 in a presidential primary challenge to then-President Ford. Reagan's candidacy was near collapse when it came time for the North Carolina primary. Helms was in charge of the effort, and Reagan won a startling upset that resurrected his challenge.

"It's not saying too much to say that had Senator Helms not put his weight and his political organization behind Ronald Reagan so that he was able to win North Carolina, there may have never been a Reagan presidency," Cobey said. "Most people feel like there would have never been a President Reagan had it not been for Jesse Helms."

During the 1990s, Helms clashed frequently with Clinton, whom he deemed unqualified to be commander in chief. Even some Republicans cringed when Helms said Clinton was so unpopular he would need a bodyguard on North Carolina military bases. Helms said he hadn't meant it as a threat.

Asked to gauge Clinton's performance overall, Helms said in 1995: "He's a nice guy. He's very pleasant. But ... (as) Ronald Reagan used to say about another politician, `Deep down, he's shallow.'"

Helms went out of his way to establish good relations with Madeleine Albright, Clinton's second secretary of state. But that didn't stop him from single-handedly blocking Clinton's appointment of William Weld — a Republican — as ambassador to Mexico.

Helms clashed with other Republicans over the years, including fellow Sen. Richard Lugar of Indiana in 1987, after Democrats had won a Senate majority. Helms had promised in his 1984 campaign not to take the chairmanship of the Foreign Relations Committee, but he invoked seniority over Lugar to claim the seat as the panel's ranking Republican.

He was unafraid of inconveniencing his fellow senators — sometimes all of them at once. "I did not come to Washington to win a popularity contest," he once said while holding the Senate in session with a filibuster that delayed the beginning of a Christmas break. And he once objected to a request by phoning in his dissent from home, where he was watching Senate proceedings on television.

Helms was born in Monroe, N.C., on Oct. 18, 1921. He attended Wake Forest College in 1941 but never graduated and was in the Navy during World War II.

In many ways, Helms' values were forged in the small town where his father was police chief.

"I shall always remember the shady streets, the quiet Sundays, the cotton wagons, the Fourth of July parades, the New Year's Eve firecrackers. I shall never forget the stream of school kids marching uptown to place flowers on the Courthouse Square monument on Confederate Memorial Day," Helms wrote in a newspaper column in 1956.

He took an active role in North Carolina politics early on, working to elect a segregationist candidate, Willis Smith, to the Senate in 1950. He worked as Smith's top staff aide for a time, then returned to Raleigh as executive director of the state bankers association.

Helms became a member of the Raleigh city council in 1957 and got his first public platform for espousing his conservative views when he became a television editorialist for WRAL in Raleigh in 1960. He also wrote a column that at one time was carried in 200 newspapers. Helms also was city editor at The Raleigh Times.

Helms and his wife, Dorothy, had two daughters and a son. They adopted the boy in 1962 after the child, 9 years old and suffering from cerebral palsy, said in a newspaper article that he wanted parents.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on July 04, 2008, 02:47:03 PM
hahaha... Bill Hicks is tapdancing somewhere...

Quote
Anyone.... you know when jesse helms finally dies..... he's going to commit suicide first of all, out back behind a pecan tree........ he's going to slash his wrists and write in blood, "I've been a bad boy."

But you know they're going to find the skins of young children drying in his attic. Swarms of horseflies going in and out of the eaves, and on CNN over and over his wife goin, "I always wondered about jesse's collection of little shoes."

Anyone that far to the right is fuckin hiding a deep dark secret.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 04, 2008, 06:25:46 PM
Quote
Bozo The Clown Harmon Dies

Bozo The Clown star Larry Harmon has died at the age of 83.

Harmon, who first portrayed the beloved children's character in the 1950s, suffered heart failure and passed away at his Los Angeles home on Thursday, according to his publicist Jerry Digney.

Harmon, real name Lawrence Weiss, became famed as Bozo the Clown after buying the licensing rights to the franchise from creator Alan W. Livingston and executives at Capitol Records in 1956.

His entrepreneurship led to the creation of a series of cartoons, which he voiced, and the comic book character was later portrayed by other actors on local TV stations across the U.S.

Paying tribute to the star, his wife of 29 years, Susan Harmon, says, "(He was) the love of my life.

"He was the most optimistic man I ever met. He always saw a bright side; he always had something good to say about everybody."

Harmon is also survived by his son Jeff Harmon, and daughters Lori Harmon, Marci Breth-Carabet and Leslie Breth.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on July 04, 2008, 06:38:59 PM
Aw man... I used to watch that show all the time.

Anyone remember the game where kids had to throw ping pong balls into buckets and they'd win toys?  It would have been my dream as a kid to get to play that game and win all that cool loot.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Matt on July 05, 2008, 08:03:28 PM
Burn in Hell, Helms.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 06, 2008, 11:10:54 PM
Thomas Disch killed himself on the 4th.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_M._Disch

He's the Brave Little Toaster author.

Here's his last Livejournal entry, from the 2nd:


Quote
Inflation/ Starvation/ Fun
Short of succumbing to the madness of anorexia, I doubt I am likely to experience actual starvation before I die. Nor, I'd bet, will most of those who visit this site. But I'd also bet that most of us have felt the pinch of inflation in our daily diet. I remember the rapid evolution of low-cost middle-class A & P into up-scale, twice-the-price Food Emporium with no practical difference except the prices and the phasing out of cooking staples, a process still barely begun in most supermarkets. The eventual goal is shelves stocked only with bachelor commodities--breadfast cereal, frozen entrees for dieters, and bellywash in small bottles. Cooking gas will be rationed in winter as people try to heat their urban apartments with their ovens. Etc.

I'm curious as to where we are on that scale now. How has your own diet been affected? I had sticker shock this week when I found that a "low-cost" lunch has climbed from $5 to $10/15 in just the last couple years. The Tv advertises a $5 slice of pizza as a bargain. I don't see how teens can get by unless they are dealing drugs or balling for dollars.

But that's just me. Maybe there have been no changes in your part of Omaha at all. Just curious.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on July 07, 2008, 12:36:15 AM
Well, that's depressing.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on July 07, 2008, 02:45:26 AM
i'd never noticed him.  What should I read? 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 07, 2008, 07:29:24 AM
i'd never noticed him.  What should I read? 


He's the Brave Little Toaster author.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Matt on July 07, 2008, 08:13:01 AM
That was a good movie.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 07, 2008, 12:15:19 PM
Here you go, Fajwat:

http://www.mediabistro.com/galleycat/authors/thomas_m_disch_19402008_88558.asp?c=rss

A bit more on him.  Also, I bet Tachyon is secretly fist pumping the air.  They just got themselves a bestseller.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 09, 2008, 07:43:08 AM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Turner_(comics)

Quote
Comic book artist Michael Turner dies at 37

Michael Turner, a comic book artist who drew covers for major titles such as "Superman/Batman,""The Flash" and "Civil War,'" has died. He was 37.

Turner died June 27 at a Santa Monica hospital of complications related to cancer, said Vince Hernandez, editor in chief of Aspen MLT, the Santa Monica publishing company Turner founded in 2003. Turner had battled bone cancer for eight years.

Through his company, Turner created online comic adaptations for the NBC series "Heroes" and published his own titles, including the best-selling "Fathom," a deep-sea story about a female superhero.

He also drew covers for large projects such as DC Comics'"Justice League" and Marvel's "Civil War" and was a regular cover artist for "Superman/Batman" and "The Flash."

"He was definitely one of the most popular and influential comic-book artists working right now," said Andrew Farago, curator of San Francisco's Cartoon Art Museum. "He was very, very much in demand as a cover artist on high-profile projects."

Ryan Liebowitz, general manager of the Golden Apple Comics store in Los Angeles, said Turner's name was synonymous with special-edition covers that often became collectibles. The milestone 500th issue of "Uncanny X-Men," due out next week, will feature a special-edition cover by Turner.

Turner was also known for drawing female comic book characters that evoked both innocence and sex appeal and exuded energy.

In 1994, the budding artist was hired by Century City-based Top Cow Productions after an editor saw his work at the Comic-Con convention in San Diego.

At Top Cow, Turner co-created "Witchblade," a comic about a voluptuous female detective who fights evil after discovering a mystical glove. The comic went on to make Top Cow's name and set the standard for Turner's future work.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on July 10, 2008, 11:16:08 AM
Bone cancer sucks in big horrible painful ways.  I hope his end wasn't so bad as some I've known.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 11, 2008, 09:55:47 AM
The AP's bored...and so am I!


Quote
Obituaries in the news

The Associated Press
Friday, July 11, 2008

Bruce Conner

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Bruce Conner, an iconoclastic artist and avant-garde filmmaker of the Beat era, has died. He was 74.

Conner died Monday of natural causes at home, said his wife, artist Jean Conner.

One of the last surviving artists who was associated with San Francisco's Beat scene of the 1950s, Conner remained active and influential in the contemporary art world throughout his life.

In 1958, Conner made the 12-minute experimental film, "A Movie," in which he set snippets of B-movies and other found newsreel and film clips to music. The film has been cited as a precursor of music videos, and in 1991, the National Film Registry selected it for preservation in the Library of Congress.

Throughout his career, Conner also collaborated with many visual artists and musicians, including David Byrne and Brian Eno on the 1982 short film "America is Waiting" and the band Devo for a film he made in the 1970s.

He gained international attention for assemblages he built from old stockings, photographs, broken dolls and other discarded items, which were viewed as a social criticism of American consumer society.

___

Mike Souchak

DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — Former PGA Tour professional and Duke Sports Hall of Fame member Mike Souchak has died. He was 81.

The school said he died Thursday in Belleair, Fla. It did not give the cause of death.

Souchak won 15 events on the PGA Tour from 1955-66 and had 11 top-10 finishes in major championships. He finished third at the U.S. Open in 1959 and 1960, and played on the winning U.S. Ryder Cup teams in '59 and '61.

He set a tour record for four-round low score at the 1955 Texas Open, opening with a 60 and finishing a 257. That record stood until Mark Calcavecchia's 256 at the 2001 Phoenix Open.

At Duke, Souchak lettered three seasons in football and four in golf, helping the Blue Devils win two Southern Conference golf titles.

___

Janwillem van de Wetering

SURRY, Maine (AP) — Janwillem van de Wetering, a Dutch-born author who penned a popular detective series set in his home country, has died. He was 77.

He died July 4 of complications from cancer, said Nikki Smith, his literary agent.

Born in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Van de Wetering moved to Maine in 1975 and enjoyed a passion for Zen Buddhism, motorcycles and jazz, among other things.

He lived in a number of countries including Japan, where he joined a Zen monastery, which he wrote about in his first book, "The Empty Mirror: Experiences in a Japanese Zen Monastery."

Later, Van de Wetering created the popular "Grijpstra and de Gier" series of detective novels set in Amsterdam that drew from his experience as a police officer.

In 1984, he was awarded the international Grand Prix de Litterature Policiere, a French prize for crime fiction, for his book "The Maine Massacre," a Grijpstra and de Gier mystery set in Maine. He also wrote three children's books set in Surry, Maine, that feature a porcupine named Hugh Pine.

Van de Wetering settled in Maine after coming to the state to join a Zen community and he later sailed up and down the coast in an old lobster boat, Smith said.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 12, 2008, 01:20:48 PM
Quote
Former White House spokesman Tony Snow dies


WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Former White House press secretary Tony Snow -- who once told reporters "I'm a very lucky guy" -- died at the age of 53 early Saturday after a second battle with cancer.

Snow, who had been undergoing chemotherapy treatments for a recurrence of the disease, left his White House job September 14, 2007, and joined CNN in April as a conservative commentator.

President Bush said Saturday that he and first lady Laura Bush were "deeply saddened" by Snow's death.

"The Snow family has lost a beloved husband and father. And America has lost a devoted public servant and a man of character," the president said in a statement.

"It was a joy to watch Tony at the podium each day."

Snow also worked for the first President Bush, who commented Saturday:

"In this case it isn't a press secretary. It isn't a speech writer. It was a dear, valued friend that went on to heaven. ... He won the respect of even those who violently disagree with the president's proposals and policies. For that I think he'll be remembered. He brought a certain civility to this very contentious job."

Snow's successor, White House press secretary Dana Perino, said, "The White House is so deeply saddened by this loss. He was a great friend and colleague and a fantastic press secretary. And his dear family is in our thoughts and prayers." PhotoSee images from Tony Snow's White House days »

Republican Rep. John Boehner called Snow "a proud son of Cincinnati," the Ohio city that Boehner represents in Congress and where Snow grew up.

"Churchill said, 'I like a man who grins when he fights,' and that was Tony Snow," Boehner said. "For 35 years, as a writer, broadcaster, and spokesman, he fought fiercely for what he believed in, and he did it with a smile on his face and a twinkle in his eye. His loss is a loss for our country."

In 2007, Chief of Staff Josh Bolten had told senior White House staffers that unless they could commit to staying until Bush leaves office in January 2009, they should leave by Labor Day 2007, so Snow resigned.

In parting comments to reporters at his final White House news conference, Snow said, "I feel great."

He also called the job "the most fun I've ever had."

Snow said he was leaving the White House position to make more money for his family. His White House salary was $168,000, and he said he had taken out a loan so he could take the job. Snow said he was leaving because the loan money ran out. VideoWatch the White House staff's warm send-off »

Snow is survived by his wife, Jill Walker, and three children -- Kendall, Robbie and Kristi.

Snow was first diagnosed with colon cancer in February 2005. His colon was removed, and after six months of treatment, doctors said the cancer was in remission.

A recurrence of the illness was diagnosed 11 months after he began the White House media job. At that time, doctors also discovered that the colon cancer had spread to his liver.

He underwent five weeks of treatment before resuming his daily briefings to the press corps. He was greeted with applause upon his return.

"Not everybody will survive cancer," Snow told the reporters, "but on the other hand, you have got to realize you've got the gift of life, so make the most of it. That is my view, and I'm going to make the most of my time with you."

Perino announced March 27, 2007, that Snow's cancer had recurred, and said doctors had removed a growth from his abdomen the day before. VideoWatch how Snow fought through the illness »

Bush tapped Snow to replace Scott McClellan in April 2006.

Snow had been an anchor for "Fox News Sunday" and a political analyst for Fox News Channel, which he joined in 1996. He also hosted "The Tony Snow Show" on Fox News Radio.

During the 1990s, he was a regular guest host for Rush Limbaugh's radio program. During that decade he was a writer, correspondent and host of a PBS news special, "The New Militant Center," a regular commentator for National Public Radio and a frequent guest on television news programs.

Snow was known for his candor.

In a November 11, 2005, column, Snow wrote that Bush's "wavering conservatism has become an active concern among Republicans, who wish he would stop cowering under the bed and start fighting back against the likes of Harry Reid, Nancy Pelosi and Joe Wilson."

"The newly passive George Bush has become something of an embarrassment," Snow's column said.

"I asked him about those comments," the president joked at the time of Snow's appointment. "And he said, 'You should have heard what I said about the other guy.'"

Bush said Snow's long career as a journalist helped him understand "the importance of the relationship between government and those whose job it is to cover the government."

Robert Anthony Snow was born June 1, 1955, in Berea, Kentucky, and was raised in Cincinnati. When he was 17, his mother died of colon cancer at age 38.

After receiving a bachelor's degree in philosophy from Davidson College near Charlotte, North Carolina, in 1977, Snow pursued graduate work in philosophy and economics at the University of Chicago.

He worked as an editorial writer and editor at several newspapers, including The Washington Times and the Detroit News. He wrote a column in Detroit, and later wrote a syndicated column.

Snow joined the administration of Bush's father, George H.W. Bush, in 1991, first as chief speech writer and later as deputy assistant to the president for media affairs.

Snow became a television personality when he launched his news shows on Fox in 1993.

When he returned to work at the White House on April 30, 2007, after the second cancer diagnosis, a usually articulate and loquacious Snow stumbled to find words.

"You never anticipate this stuff," he said. "It just happens."

"I want to thank you all. It really meant the world to me. Anybody who does not not believe that thoughts and prayers make a difference, they're just wrong."

He then prefaced a discussion of his health by saying, "I'm a very lucky guy."

Outside of work, Snow played the guitar, saxophone and flute, and was in a band called Beats Workin' with other Washington professionals.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 22, 2008, 04:32:31 PM
Quote
Estelle Getty of 'Golden Girls' dies at 84

By BOB THOMAS – 39 minutes ago

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Estelle Getty, the diminutive actress who spent 40 years struggling for success before landing a role of a lifetime in 1985 as the sarcastic octogenarian Sophia on TV's "The Golden Girls," has died. She was 84.

Getty, who suffered from advanced dementia, died at about 5:30 a.m. Tuesday at her Hollywood Boulevard home, said her son, Carl Gettleman of Santa Monica.

"She was loved throughout the world in six continents, and if they loved sitcoms in Antarctica she would have been loved on seven continents," her son said. "She was one of the most talented comedic actresses who ever lived."

"The Golden Girls," featuring four female retirees sharing a house in Miami, grew out of NBC programming chief Brandon Tartikoff's belief that television was ignoring its older viewers.

Three of its stars had already appeared in previous series: Bea Arthur in "Maude," Betty White in "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and Rue McClanahan in "Mama's Family." The last character to be cast was Sophia Petrillo, the feisty 80-something mother of Arthur's character.

"Our mother-daughter relationship was one of the greatest comic duos ever, and I will miss her," Arthur said in a statement.

When she auditioned, Getty was appearing on stage in Hollywood as the carping Jewish mother in Harvey Fierstein's play "Torch Song Trilogy." In her early 60s, she flunked her "Golden Girls" test twice because it was believed she didn't look old enough to play 80.

"I could understand that," she told an interviewer a year after the show debuted. "I walk fast, I move fast, I talk fast."

She came prepared for the third audition, however, wearing dowdy clothes and telling an NBC makeup artist, "To you this is just a job. To me it's my entire career down the toilet unless you make me look 80." The artist did, Getty got the job and won two Emmys.

"The only comfort at this moment is that although Estelle has moved on, Sophia will always be with us," White said in an e-mail to The Associated Press after Getty's death was announced.

"The Golden Girls" culminated a long struggle for success during which Getty worked low-paying office jobs to help support her family while she tried to make it as a stage actress.

"I knew I could be seduced by success in another field, so I'd say, 'Don't promote me, please,'" she recalled.

She also appeared in small parts in a handful of films and TV movies during that time, including "Tootsie," "Deadly Force" and "Victims for Victims: The Theresa Saldana Story."

After her success in "The Golden Girls," other roles came her way. She played Cher's mother in "Mask," Sylvester Stallone's in "Stop or My Mom Will Shoot" and Barry Manilow's in the TV film "Copacabana." Other credits included "Mannequin" and "Stuart Little" (as the voice of Grandma Estelle).

"The Golden Girls," which ran from 1985 to 1992, was an immediate hit, and Sophia, who began as a minor character, soon evolved into a major one.

Audiences particularly loved the verbal zingers Getty would hurl at the other three. When McClanahan's libidinous character Blanche once complained that her life was an open book, Sophia shot back, "Your life's an open blouse."

Getty had gained a knack for one-liners in her late teens when she did standup comedy at a Catskills hotel. Female comedians were rare in those days, however, and she bombed.

Undeterred, she continued to pursue a career in entertainment, and while her parents were encouraging, her father also insisted that she learn office skills so she would have something to fall back on.

Born Estelle Scher to Polish immigrants in New York, Getty fell in love with theater when she saw a vaudeville show at age 4.

She married New York businessman Arthur Gettleman (the source of her stage name) in 1947, and they had two sons, Carl and Barry. The marriage prevailed despite her long absences on the road and in "The Golden Girls."

Getty was evasive about her height, acknowledging only that she was "under 5 feet and under 100 pounds."

In addition to her son Carl, Getty is survived by son Barry Gettleman, of Miami; a brother, David Scher of London; and a sister, Rosilyn Howard of Las Vegas.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on July 22, 2008, 04:53:43 PM
Aww.  Golden Girls was and is a great sitcom.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on July 25, 2008, 01:12:53 PM
Quote
'Last Lecture' professor dies at 47

PITTSBURGH, Pennsylvania (AP) -- Randy Pausch, a Carnegie Mellon University computer scientist whose "last lecture" about facing terminal cancer became an Internet sensation and a best-selling book, died Friday. He was 47.

Pausch died at his home in Virginia, university spokeswoman Anne Watzman said. Pausch and his family moved there last fall to be closer to his wife's relatives.

Pausch was diagnosed with incurable pancreatic cancer in September 2006. His popular last lecture at Carnegie Mellon in September 2007 garnered international attention and was viewed by millions on the Internet.

In it, Pausch celebrated living the life he had always dreamed of instead of concentrating on impending death.

"The lecture was for my kids, but if others are finding value in it, that is wonderful," Pausch wrote on his Web site. "But rest assured; I'm hardly unique."

Randy Pausch Last Lecture: Achieving Your Childhood Dreams
 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ji5_MqicxSo)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 25, 2008, 01:16:40 PM
I just was getting ready to post that, Nubbins.

If you guys haven't watched the last lecture, it's awesome.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 25, 2008, 01:25:06 PM
Addicted to the obits thread!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on July 25, 2008, 01:25:40 PM
Yeah, his lecture is great... he seemed like a really cool guy.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Matt on July 26, 2008, 03:21:53 AM
I posted that link months ago in the YouTube thread. That guy fucking rocked.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on August 04, 2008, 11:15:00 AM
Probably no one but me cares about this, but it is a very big deal here...

Quote
Chipper, Cox, other Braves mourn Caray

Broadcast partner Van Wieren says his honesty will be missed


By CARROLL ROGERS
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Published on: 08/03/08
 
News of Skip Caray's passing hit the Braves family hard -- his longtime broadcast partner, and players who identified this organization with Caray long before they ever became a part of it, even the most veteran of players, Tom Glavine, Chipper Jones and John Smoltz

Smoltz and Caray's broadcast partner Pete Van Wieren were on the Braves' charter flight to San Francisco when they learned of Caray's death.

"It's a sad day," Smoltz said. "There are no words. Sad doesn't do it justice. I will always remember Skip for his humor and his ability to go about life the way he did. I gained so much respect for what he did and how long he did and how he did."

Jones was at home with his family on Sunday evening when he was informed.

"I figured Skip Caray is as much a part of Atlanta Braves baseball as any of us," said Jones, who will rejoin the team in Arizona later this week. "We all grew up listening to Skip, whether it be on TV or radio. Any time the guys on ESPN imitate [you] calling the highlights, you're pretty much a legend. From a fan's standpoint, he's going to be a huge loss for them because he relayed the games to fans for so long."

The loss transcends the game for players. Jones said his friendship with Caray was formed over long charter flights and daily visits in the clubhouse.

"He always made a note to come by my locker and shake my hand, ask me how I was doing, how the family was, how my kids were," Jones said. "Personally over the last 15, 16, 17 years, I haven't gotten his play-by-play on the radio or TV, but I had a lot of plane flight conversations with him. I really respected him, as well as the whole Caray family. They have a pretty good legacy working over there. It's a sad day for Braves baseball."

Said manager Bobby Cox: "This was completely unexpected and is a complete loss. I had just spoken with Skip this week when we did the radio show and I didn't know he wasn't feeling well. He seemed in his normal good spirits. We've all lost a very good friend. For me, he was a good buddy -- at the park and away from the park. We always had a lot of great laughs. He will be very sorely missed."

Cox tapped a napping Van Wieren on the shoulder during the flight to inform him of Caray's death.

Fans related so well to Caray, Van Wieren said, because he told it like it was, even if he couched it in humor.

"But behind the humor there was an honesty and a commitment to telling it like he believed it to be that never, ever varied," Van Wieren said. "If he didn't like it that a game was two minutes late getting started, everybody knew about it. If he had an opinion on a player, he said it. And he had a way of saying it that was sometimes humorous. The way he could take a bad ball game, in some of those bad years especially, and turn it into a fun broadcast, whether it was by talking about something in the game or whether it was talking about something that didn't have anything to do with the game, maybe it was a movie that was coming up after the game or maybe it was a restaurant that he'd gone to. It could have been anything. He was just a very entertaining broadcaster and a very good one. The game was still the most important thing, but if game was decided by the fourth or fifth inning, people would still watch the rest of the game just to hear what he had to say about things. That's a very, very unique ability."

Caray's health had deteriorated over the past year, and he faced several close calls during a hospital stay last fall. But Caray, who was broadcasting only home games this season, worked as recently as Thursday's game before taking the weekend off.

"Regardless of how much you prepare yourself for it, you're always surprised," Glavine said. "Skip, of late, seemed to be doing a lot better. His immediate future was off of everybody's minds. It's a surprise, a shock."

Glavine said he'll cherish the relationship he developed with Caray over the years.

"We were able to joke around with one another, laugh at one another, and we also had a mutual respect for one another," Glavine said. "I'll miss that, seeing him around the game, taking a jab or two."

He knows it will be a difficult loss for Braves fans, too.

"For so long, he was what people associated with the Atlanta Braves," Glavine said. "Turn on TBS, and there was Skip. Good times, bad times, that was the constant. The voice people identify the Braves with is Skip Caray. That's going to be missed.

"Not only are the Braves losing somebody special from their organization, baseball is too."

It'll be especially tough for the players who knew him for so long.

"It's wild how when somebody spends so much time in one organization and has had the history that he's had, it's very difficult to have it abruptly end, especially while he's doing it," Smoltz said. "Unfortunately he ended up dying doing something he loved. It'll be a tough day, a tough week."

For Jones, this was the most tragic turn of a Braves season already marred by injuries and disappointment.

"You sit back and as a Brave, and anybody affiliated with the Braves, you wonder what else could happen to this team this year," Jones said. "It's been one blow after another."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 04, 2008, 11:53:52 AM
Not familiar with his work but, after this obit, I think I'll read a bit more about him...

From IHT:

Quote
Solzhenitsyn, 20th-century oracle, dies
By Michael T. Kaufman
Monday, August 4, 2008

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, whose stubborn, lonely and combative literary struggles gained the force of prophecy as he revealed the heavy afflictions of Soviet Communism in some of the most powerful literary works of the 20th century, died late on Sunday at the age of 89 in Moscow. His son Yermolai said the cause was a heart ailment.

Solzhenitsyn outlived by nearly 17 years the Soviet state and system he had battled through years of imprisonment, ostracism and exile.

Solzhenitsyn had been an obscure, middle-aged, unpublished high school science teacher in a provincial Russian town when he burst onto the literary stage in 1962 with "A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich." The book, a mold-breaking novel about a prison camp inmate, was a sensation. Suddenly he was being compared to giants of Russian literature like Tolstoy, Dostoyevski and Chekov.

Over the next five decades, Solzhenitsyn's fame spread throughout the world as he drew upon his experiences of totalitarian duress to write evocative novels like "The First Circle" and "The Cancer Ward" and historical works like "The Gulag Archipelago."

"Gulag" was a monumental account of the Soviet labor camp system, a chain of prisons that by Solzhenitsyn's calculation some 60 million people had entered during the 20th century. The book led to his expulsion from his native land. George Kennan, the American diplomat, described it as "the greatest and most powerful single indictment of a political regime ever to be leveled in modern times."

Solzhenitsyn was heir to a morally focused and often prophetic Russian literary tradition, and he looked the part. With his stern visage, lofty brow and full, Old Testament beard, he recalled Tolstoy while suggesting a modern-day Jeremiah, denouncing the evils of the Kremlin and later the mores of the West. He returned to Russia and deplored what he considered its spiritual decline, but in the last years of his life he embraced President Vladimir Putin as a restorer of Russia's greatness.

In almost half a century, more than 30 million of his books have been sold worldwide and translated into some 40 languages. In 1970 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Solzhenitsyn owed his initial success to the Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev's decision to allow "Ivan Denisovich" to be published in a popular journal. Khrushchev believed its publication would advance the liberal line he had promoted since his secret speech in 1956 on the crimes of Stalin.

But soon after the story appeared, Khrushchev was replaced by hard-liners, and they campaigned to silence its author. They stopped publication of his new works, denounced him as a traitor and confiscated his manuscripts.

A Giant and a Victim

But their iron grip could not contain Solzhenitsyn's reach. By then his works were appearing outside the Soviet Union, in many languages, and he was being compared not only to Russia's literary giants but also to Stalin's literary victims, writers like Anna Akhmatova, Iosip Mandleshtam and Boris Pasternak.

At home, the Kremlin stepped up its campaign by expelling Solzhenitsyn from the Writer's Union. He fought back. He succeeded in having microfilms of his banned manuscripts smuggled out of the Soviet Union. He addressed petitions to government organs, wrote open letters, rallied support among friends and artists, and corresponded with people abroad. They turned his struggles into one of the most celebrated cases of the cold war period.

Hundreds of well-known intellectuals signed petitions against his silencing; the names of left-leaning figures like Jean-Paul Sartre carried particular weight with Moscow. Other supporters included Graham Greene, Muriel Spark, W.H. Auden, Gunther Grass, Heinrich Boll, Yukio Mishima, Carlos Fuentes and, from the United States, Arthur Miller, John Updike, Truman Capote and Kurt Vonnegut. All joined a call for an international cultural boycott of the Soviet Union.

That position was confirmed when he was awarded the 1970 Nobel Prize in the face of Moscow's protests. The Nobel jurists cited him for "the ethical force with which he has pursued the indispensable traditions of Russian literature."

Solzhenitsyn dared not travel to Stockholm to accept the prize for fear that the Soviet authorities would prevent him from returning. But his acceptance address was circulated widely. He recalled a time when "in the midst of exhausting prison camp relocations, marching in a column of prisoners in the gloom of bitterly cold evenings, with strings of camp lights glimmering through the darkness, we would often feel rising in our breast what we would have wanted to shout out to the whole world — if only the whole world could have heard us."

He wrote that while an ordinary man was obliged "not to participate in lies," artists had greater responsibilities. "It is within the power of writers and artists to do much more: to defeat the lie!"

By this time, Solzhenitsyn had completed his own massive attempt at truthfulness, "The Gulag Archipelago." In more than 300,000 words, he told the history of the Gulag prison camps, whose operations and rationale and even existence were subjects long considered taboo.

Publishers in Paris and New York had secretly received the manuscript on microfilm. But wanting the book to appear first in the Soviet Union, Solzhenitsyn asked them to put off publishing it. Then, in September 1973, he changed his mind. He had learned that the Soviet spy agency, the KGB, had unearthed a buried copy of the book after interrogating his typist, Elizaveta Voronyanskaya, and that she had hung herself soon afterward.

He went on the offensive. With his approval, the book was speedily published in Paris, in Russian, just after Christmas. The Soviet government counterattacked with a spate of articles, including one in Pravda, the state-run newspaper, headlined "The Path of a Traitor." He and his family were followed, and he received death threats.

On Feb. 12, 1974, he was arrested. The next day, he was told that he was being deprived of his citizenship and deported. On his arrest, he had been careful to take with him a threadbare cap and a shabby sheepskin coat that he had saved from his years in exile. He wore them both as he was marched onto an Aeroflot flight to Frankfurt. .

Solzhenitsyn was welcomed by the German novelist Heinrich Böll. Six weeks after his expulsion, Solzhenitsyn was joined by his wife, Natalia Svetlova, and three sons. She had played a critical role in organizing his notes and transmitting his manuscripts. After a short stay in Switzerland, the family moved to the United States, settling in the hamlet of Cavendish, Vermont

There he kept mostly to himself for some 18 years, protected from sightseers by neighbors, who posted a sign saying, "No Directions to the Solzhenitsyns." He kept writing and thinking a great deal about Russia and hardly at all about his new environment, so certain was he that he would return to his homeland one day.

His rare public appearances could turn into hectoring jeremiads. Delivering the commencement address at Harvard in 1978, he called the country of his sanctuary spiritually weak and mired in vulgar materialism. Americans, he said, speaking in Russian through a translator, were cowardly. Few were willing to die for their ideals, he said. He condemned both the United States government and American society for its "hasty" capitulation in Vietnam. And he criticized the country's music as intolerable and attacked its unfettered press, accusing it of violations of privacy.

Many in the West did not know what to make of the man. He was perceived as a great writer and hero who had defied the Russian authorities. Yet he seemed willing to lash out at everyone else as well — democrats, secularists, capitalists, liberals and consumers.

David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, who has written extensively about the Soviet Union and visited Solzhenitsyn, wrote in 2001: "In terms of the effect he has had on history, Solzhenitsyn is the dominant writer of the 20th century. Who else compares? Orwell? Koestler? And yet when his name comes up now, it is more often than not as a freak, a monarchist, an anti-Semite, a crank, a has been."

In the 1970s, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger warned President Gerald Ford to avoid seeing Solzhenitsyn. "Solzhenitsyn is a notable writer, but his political views are an embarrassment even to his fellow dissidents," Kissinger wrote in a memo. "Not only would a meeting with the president offend the Soviets, but it would raise some controversy about Solzhenitsyn's views of the United States and its allies." Ford followed the advice.

The writer Susan Sontag recalled a conversation about Solzhenitsyn between her and Joseph Brodsky, the Russian poet who had followed Solzhenitsyn into forced exile and who would also become a Nobel laureate. "We were laughing and agreeing about how we thought Solzhenitsyn's views on the United States, his criticism of the press, and all the rest were deeply wrong, and on and on," she said. "And then Joseph said: 'But you know, Susan, everything Solzhenitsyn says about the Soviet Union is true. Really, all those numbers — 60 million victims — it's all true.' "

Ivan Denisovich

In the autumn of 1961, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn was a 43-year-old high school teacher of physics and astronomy in Ryazan, a city some 70 miles south of Moscow. He had been there since 1956, when his sentence of perpetual exile in a dusty region of Khazakstan was suspended. Aside from his teaching duties, he was writing and rewriting stories he had conceived while confined in prisons and labor camps since 1944.

One story, a short novel, was "A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich," an account of a single day in an icy prison camp written in the voice of an inmate named Ivan Denisovich Shukov, a bricklayer. With little sentimentality, he recounts the trials and sufferings of "zeks," as the prisoners were known, peasants who were willing to risk punishment and pain as they seek seemingly small advantages like a few more minutes before a fire. He also reveals their survival skills, their loyalty to their work brigade and their pride.

The day ends with the prisoner in his bunk. "Shukov felt pleased with his life as he went to sleep," Solzhenitsyn wrote. Shukov was pleased because, among other things, he had not been put in an isolation cell, and his brigade had avoided a work assignment in a place unprotected from the bitter wind, and he had swiped some extra gruel, and had been able to buy a bit of tobacco from another prisoner.

"The end of an unclouded day. Almost a happy one," Solzhenitsyn wrote, adding: "Just one of the 3,653 days of his sentence, from bell to bell. The extra three days were for leap years."

Solzhenitsyn typed the story single spaced, using both sides to save paper. He sent one copy to Lev Kopelev, an intellectual with whom he had shared a cell 16 years earlier. Kopelev, who later became a well known dissident, realized that under Khrushchev's policies of liberalization, it might be possible to have the story published by Novy Mir, or The New World, the most prestigious of the Soviet Union's so-called thick literary and cultural journals. Kopelev and his colleagues steered the manuscript around lower editors who might have blocked its publication and took it to Aleksandr Tvardovsky, the editor and a Politburo member who backed Khrushchev.

On reading the manuscript, Tvardovsky summoned Solzhenitsyn from Ryazan. "You have written a marvelous thing," he told him. "You have described only one day, and yet everything there is to say about prison has been said." He likened the story to Tolstoy's moral tales. Other editors compared it to Dostoyevski's "House of the Dead," which the author had based on his own experience of incarceration in czarist times. Tvardovsky offered Solzhenitsyn a contract worth more than twice his teacher's annual salary, but he cautioned that he was not certain he could publish the story.

Tvardovsky was eventually able to get Khrushchev himself to read "A Day in the Life." Khrushchev was impressed, and by mid-October 1962, the presidium of the Politburo took up the question of whether to allow it to be published. The presidium ultimately agreed, and in his biography "Solzhenitsyn" (Norton, 1985), Michael Scammell wrote that Khrushchev defended the decision and was reported to have declared: "There's a Stalinist in each of you; there's even a Stalinist in me. We must root out this evil."

The novel appeared in Novy Mir in early 1963. The critic Kornei Chukovsky pronounced the work "a literary miracle." Grigori Baklanov, a respected novelist and writer about World War II, declared that the story was one of those rare creations after which "it is impossible to go on writing as one did before."

Novy Mir ordered extra printings, and every copy was sold. A book edition and an inexpensive newspaper version also vanished from the shelves.

Solzhenitsyn was not the first to write about the camps. As early as 1951, Gustav Herling, a Pole, had published "A World Apart," about the three years he spent in a labor camp on the White Sea. Some Soviet writers had typed accounts of their own experiences, and these pages and their carbon copies were passed from reader to reader in a clandestine, self-publishing effort called zamizdat. Given the millions who had been forced into the gulag, few families could have been unaware of the camp experiences of relatives or friends. But few had had access to these accounts. "A Day in the Life" changed that.

Born With the Soviet Union

Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn was born in the Caucasus spa town of Kislovodsk on Dec. 11, 1918, a year after the Soviet Union arose from revolution. His father, Isaaki, had been a Russian artillery officer on the German front and married to Taissa Shcherback by the brigade priest. Shortly after he was demobilized and six months before his son's birth, he was killed in a hunting accident. The young widow took the child to Rostov-on-Don, where she reared him while working as a typist and stenographer. By Solzhenitsyn's account, he and his mother lived in a dilapidated hut. Still, her class origins — she was the daughter of a Ukrainian land owner — were considered suspect, as was her knowledge of English and French. Solzhenitsyn remembered her burying his father's three war medals because they could indicate reactionary beliefs.

He was religious. When he was a child, older boys once ripped a cross from his neck. Nonetheless, at 12, though the Communists repudiated religion, he joined the Young Pioneers and later became a member of Komsomol, the Communist youth organization.

He was a good student with an aptitude for mathematics, though from adolescence he imagined becoming a writer. In 1941, a few days before Germany attacked Russia to expand World War II into Soviet territory, he graduated from Rostov University with a degree in physics and math. A year earlier, he had married Natalia Reshetovskaya, a chemist. When hostilities began, he joined the army and was assigned to look after horses and wagons before being transferred to artillery school. He spent three years in combat as a commander of a reconnaissance battery.

In February 1945, as the war in Europe drew to a close, he was arrested on the East Prussian front by agents of Smersh, the Soviet spy agency. The evidence against him was found in a letter to a school friend in which he referred to Stalin — disrespectfully, the authorities said — as "the man with the mustache." Though he was a loyal Communist, he was sentenced to eight years in a labor camp. It was his entry into the vast network of punitive institutions that he would later name the Gulag Archipelago, after the Russian acronym for the Main Administration of Camps.

His penal journey began with stays in two prisons in Moscow. Then he was transferred to a camp nearby, where he moved timbers, and then to another, called New Jerusalem, where he dug clay. From there he was taken to a camp called Kaluga Gate, where he suffered a moral and spiritual breakdown after equivocating in his response to a warden's demand that he report on fellow inmates. Though he never provided information, he referred to his nine months there as the low point in his life.

After brief stays in several other institutions, Solzhenitsyn was moved to Special Prison No. 16 on the outskirts of Moscow on July 9, 1947. This was a so-called sharashka, an institution for inmates who were highly trained scientists and whose forced labor involved advanced scientific research. He was put there because of his gift for mathematics, which he credited with saving his life. "Probably I would not have survived eight years of the camps if as a mathematician I had not been assigned for three years to a sharashka." His experiences at No. 16 provided the basis for his novel "The First Circle," which was not published outside the Soviet Union until 1968. While incarcerated at the research institute, he formed close friendships with Kopelev and another inmate, Dmitry Panin, and later modeled the leading characters of "The First Circle" on them.

Granted relative freedom within the institute, the three would meet each night to carry on intellectual discussions and debate. During the day, Solzhenitsyn was assigned to work on an electronic voice-recognition project with applications toward coding messages. In his spare time, he began to write for himself: poems, sketches and outlines of books.

He also tended toward outspokenness, and it soon undid him. After scorning the scientific work of the colonel who headed the institute, Solzhenitsyn was banished to a desolate penal camp in Kazakhstan called Ekibastuz. It would become the inspiration for "A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich."

At Ekibastaz, any writing would be seized as contraband. So he devised a method that enabled him to retain even long sections of prose. After seeing Lithuanian Catholic prisoners fashion rosaries out of beads made from chewed bread, he asked them to make a similar chain for him, but with more beads. In his hands, each bead came to represent a passage that he would repeat to himself until he could say it without hesitation. Only then would he move on to the next bead. He later wrote that by the end of his prison term, he had committed to memory 12,000 lines in this way.

'Perpetual Exile'

On Feb. 9, 1953, his term in the camps officially ended. On March 6, he was sent farther east, arriving in Kok-Terek, a desert settlement, in time to hear the announcement of Stalin's death broadcast over loudspeakers in the village square. It was here that Solzhenitsyn was ordered to spend his term of "perpetual exile."

He taught in a local school and secretly wrote poems, plays and sketches with no hope of having them published. He also began corresponding with his former wife, who during his incarceration had divorced him. He was bothered by stomach pains, and when he was able to visit a regional clinic, doctors found a large cancerous tumor.

His life as a restricted pariah struggling with the disease would lead to his novel "The Cancer Ward," which also first appeared outside the Soviet Union, in 1969. He finally managed to get to a cancer clinic in the city of Tashkent and later described his desperation there in a short story, "The Right Hand."

"I was like the sick people all around me, and yet I was different," he wrote. "I had fewer rights than they had and was forced to be more silent. People came to visit them, and their one concern, their one aim in life, was to get well again. But if I recovered, it would be almost pointless: I was 35 years of age, and yet in that spring I had no one I could call my own in the whole world. I did not even own a passport, and if I were to recover, I should have to leave this green, abundant land and go back to my desert, where I had been exiled 'in perpetuity. ' There I was under open surveillance, reported on every fortnight, and for a long time the local police had not even allowed me, a dying man, to go away for treatment."

After acquiring medical treatment and resorting to folk remedies, Solzhenitsyn did recover. In April 1956, a letter arrived informing him that his period of internal exile had been lifted and that he was free to move. In December, he spent the holidays with his former wife, and in February 1957, the two remarried. He then joined her in Ryazan, where Natalia Reshetovskaya headed the chemistry department of an agricultural college. Meanwhile, a rehabilitation tribunal invalidated his original sentence and found that he had remained "a Soviet patriot." He resumed teaching and writing, both new material as well as old, reworking some of the lines he had once stored away as he fingered his beads.

Twenty-two months elapsed between the publication of "Ivan Denisovich" and the fall of Khrushchev. Early in that period, the journal Novy Mir was able to follow up its initial success with Solzhenitsyn by publishing three more short novels by him in 1963. These would be the last of his works to be legally distributed in his homeland until the Soviet Union began to collapse in 1989.

When Leonid Brezhnev replaced Khrushchev as party leader in October 1964, it was apparent that Solzhenitsyn was being silenced. In May 1967, in an open letter to the Congress of the Soviet Writers Union, he urged that delegates "demand and ensure the abolition of all censorship, open or hidden."

He told them that manuscripts of "The First Circle" and "The Cancer Ward" had been confiscated, that for three years he and his work had been libeled through an orchestrated media campaign, and that he had been prevented from even giving public readings. "Thus," he wrote, "my work has been finally smothered, gagged, and slandered."

He added, "No one can bar the road to truth, and to advance its cause I am prepared to accept even death."

The letter touched of a battle within the writers union and in broader intellectual and political circles, pitting Solzhenitsyn's defenders against those allied with the party's hard-line leadership. Two years later, on Nov. 4, 1969, the tiny Ryazan branch of the U.S.S.R. Writers Union voted five to one to expel Solzhenitsyn. The decision ignited further furor at home. In the West, it intensified a wave of anti-Soviet sentiment that had been generated in 1968 when Soviet troops invaded Czechoslovakia to suppress the liberal reforms of the Prague spring.

The conflict grew 11 months later with the announcement that Solzhenitsyn had won the Nobel Prize for literature. The Soviet press responded with accusations that the award had been engineered by "reactionary circles for anti-Soviet purposes." One newspaper belittled the author as " a run of the mill writer"; another said it was "a sacrilege" to mention his name with the "creators of Russian and Soviet classics."

But there were also Russians willing to defend Solzhenitsyn. The eminent cellist and conductor Mstislav Rostropovich wrote to the editors of Pravda, Izvestia, and other leading newspapers praising the writer. Rostropovich, who had taken some risk in inviting Solzhenitsyn to live at his dacha near Moscow for several years, suffered official disfavor after his letter was published abroad.

Even greater risks were taken by the inmates of the Potma Labor camp. They smuggled out congratulations to Solzhenitsyn, expressing admiration for his "courageous creative work, upholding the sense of human dignity and exposing the trampling of the human soul and the destruction of human values."

Private Turmoil

At the time, Solzhenitsyn's private life was in turmoil. As news of the prize was announced, his marriage was dissolving. Two years earlier he had met Natalia Svetlova, a mathematician who was involved in typing and circulating samizdat literature, and they became drawn to each other. As Solzhenitsyn explained, "She simply joined me in my struggle and we went side by side." He asked his wife, Natalia Reshetovskaya, for a divorce. But she refused, and continued to do so for several years. At one point, shortly after he had won the prize, she attempted suicide, and he had to rush her to a hospital, where she was revived.

In the meantime, Natalia Svetlova gave birth to Yermolai and Ignat, Solzhenitsyn's two oldest sons. Finally, in March 1973, Natalia Reshetovskaya consented to a divorce. Soon afterward, Solzhenitsyn and Natalia Svetlova were married in an Orthodox church near Moscow.

His skirmishes with the state only intensified. While the authorities kept him from publishing, he kept writing and speaking out, eliciting threats by mail and phone. He slept with a pitchfork beside his bed. Finally, government agents who had tried to isolate and intimidate him arrested him, took him to the airport and deported him. Solzhenitsyn believed his stay in the United States would be temporary. "In a strange way, I not only hope, I am inwardly convinced that I shall go back," he told the BBC. "I live with that conviction. I mean my physical return, not just my books. And that contradicts all rationality."

With that goal, he lived like a recluse in rural Vermont, paying little attention to his surroundings as he kept writing about Russia, in Russian, with Russian readers in mind.

"He wrote, ate, and slept and that was about all," Remnick wrote in 1994 after visiting the Solzhenitsyn family in Cavendish. "For him to accept a telephone call was an event; he rarely left his 50 acres." In contrast to the rest of his family, he never became an American citizen.

His children — a third son, Stepan, had been born six months before Solzhenitsyn was deported — went to local schools, but they began their day with prayers in Russian for Russia's liberation, and their mother gave them Russian lessons. She also designed the pages and set the type for the 20 volumes of her husband's work that were being produced in Russian by the YMCA Press in Paris. And she administered a fund to help political prisoners and their families. Solzhenitsyn had donated to the fund all royalties from "The Gulag Archipelago," by far his best-selling book.

As for the author, he would head each morning for the writing house, a wing the Solzhenitsyns had added to the property. There he devoted himself to a gigantic work of historical fiction that eventually ran to more than 5,000 pages in four volumes. The work, called "The Red Wheel," focused on the revolutionary chaos that had spawned Bolshevism and set the stage for modern Russian history. It has been compared, at least in it's sweep and intentions, with Tolstoy's "War and Peace."

Solzhenitsyn started work on the first volume, "August 1914," in 1969, though he said he had begun thinking about the project before World War II, when he was a student in Rostov. "August 1914" was spirited out of the Soviet Union and published in Paris before Solzhenitsyn's expulsion.

He believed that his account, which challenged Soviet dogma about the founding period, was as iconoclastic as his earlier writings about the gulag.

In the United States, "August 1914" reached No. 2 on best-seller lists, but the subsequent volumes, "November 1916," "March 1917," and "April 1917," all completed in Cavendish, have not been widely bought or read.

Solzhenitsyn was displeased by the Russian reaction to "The Red Wheel," which he spoke of as the centerpiece of his creative life. He expressed the hope that it would gain importance with time.

Aloof in America

In Solzhenitsyn's 18 years in Vermont, he never warmed to Americans beyond his Cavendish neighbors. On the eve of his return to Russia in 1994, he acknowledged he had been aloof. "Instead of secluding myself here and writing 'The Red Wheel,' I suppose I could have spent time making myself likable to the West," he told Remnick. "The only problem is that I would have had to drop my way of life and my work."

But even when he stepped outside Cavendish, as he did when he addressed the Harvard graduates in 1978, his condemnations of American politics, press freedoms and and social mores struck many as insensitive, haughty and snobbish.

There were those who described him as reactionary, as an unreconstructed Slavophile, a Russian nationalist, undemocratic and authoritarian. Olga Carlisle, a writer who had helped spirit the manuscript of "The Gulag Archipelago" out of Moscow but who was no longer speaking to Solzhenitsyn, wrote in Newsweek that the Harvard speech had been intended for a Russian audience, not an American one.

"His own convictions are deeply rooted in the Russian spirit, which is untempered by the civilizing influences of a democratic tradition," Carlisle said. And Czeslaw Milosz, generally admiring of his fellow Nobel laureate, wrote, "Like the Russian masses, he, we may assume, has strong authoritarian tendencies."

Solzhenitsyn returned to Russia on May 27, 1994, first landing in the Siberian northeast, in Magadan, the former heart of the Gulag. On arrival, he bent down to touch the soil in memory of the victims.

He flew on to Vladivostok, where he and his family began a two-month journey by private railroad car across Russia, to see what his post-Communist country now looked like. The BBC was on hand to film the entire passage and pay for it.

On the first of 17 stops, his judgment was already clear. His homeland, he said, was "tortured, stunned, altered beyond recognition." As he traveled on, encountering hearty crowds, signing books and meeting dignitaries as well as ordinary people, his gloom deepened. And after settling into a new home on the edge of Moscow, he began to voice his pessimism, deploring the crime, corruption, collapsing services, faltering democracy and what he felt to be the spiritual decline of Russia.

In Vermont, he had never warmed to Mikhail Gorbachev and his reform policies of perestroika He thought they were the last-ditch tactics of a leader defending a system that Solzhenitsyn had long known to be doomed. For a while he was impressed by Boris N. Yeltsin, Russia's first freely elected leader, but then turned against him. Yeltsin, he said, had failed to defend the interests of ethnic Russians, who had become vulnerable foreign minorities in the newly independent countries that had so suddenly been sheared off from the Soviet Union. Later, he criticized the advent of Vladimir Putin as antidemocratic.

Russians initially greeted Solzhenitsyn with high hopes. On the eve of his return, a poll in St. Petersburg showed him to be the favorite choice for president. But he soon made it clear that he had no wish to take on a political role in influencing Russian society, and his reception soon turned tepid.

Few Russians were reading "The Red Wheel." The books were said to be too long for young readers.

Michael Specter, then The New York Times correspondent in Moscow, observed, "Leading intellectuals here consider his oratory hollow, his time past and his mission unclear."

Nationalists, who had once hoped for his blessing, were alienated by his rejection. Democratic reformers, who wanted his backing, were offended by his aloofness and criticism of them. Old Communists reviled him as they always had.

In October 1994, Solzhenitsyn addressed Russia's Parliament. His complaints and condemnations had not abated. "This is not a democracy, but an oligarchy," he declared. "Rule by the few." He spoke for an hour, and when he finished, there was only a smattering of applause.

Solzhenitsyn started appearing on television twice a week as the host of a 15-minute show called "A Meeting With Solzhenitsyn." Most times he veered into condemnatory monologues that left his less outspoken guests with little to do but look on. Alessandra Stanley, writing about the program for The Times, said Solzhenitsyn came across "as a combination of Charlie Rose and Moses." After receiving poor ratings, the program was canceled a year after it was started.

As the century turned, Solzhenitsyn continued to write. In a 2001 book, he confronted the relationship of Russians and Jews, a subject that some critics had long contended he had ignored or belittled in his fiction. A few accused him of anti-Semitism. Irving Howe, the literary critic, did not go that far but maintained that in "August 1914," Solzhenitsyn was dismissive of Jewish concerns and gave insufficient weight to pogroms and other persecution of the Jews. Others noted that none of the prisoners in "Ivan Denisovich" were definitively identified as a Jew, and the one whose Jewish identity was subtly hinted at was the one who had the most privileges and was protected from the greatest rigors.

Remnick defended Solzhenitsyn, saying he "in fact, is not anti-Semitic; his books are not anti-Semitic, and he is not, in his personal relations, anti-Jewish; Natalia's mother is Jewish, and not a few of his friends are, too."

In the final years of his life,, Solzhenitsyn had spoken approvingly of a "restoration" of Russia under Vladimir Putin, and was criticized in some quarters as increasingly nationalist.

In an interview last year with Der Spiegel, Solzhenitsyn said that Russians' view of the West as a "knight of democracy" had been shattered by the NATO bombing of Serbia, an event he called "a grave disillusion, a crushing of ideals." He dismissed Western democracy-building efforts, telling the Times of London in 2005 that democracy "is not worth a brass farthing if it is installed by bayonet."

In 2007, he accepted a State Prize from then-President Putin — after refusing, on principle, similar prizes from Gorbachev and from Yeltsin. Putin, he said in the Der Spiegel interview, "inherited a ransacked and bewildered country, with a poor and demoralized people. And he started to do what was possible — a slow and gradual restoration."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on August 04, 2008, 12:03:32 PM
My copy of Cancer Ward is sitting right here in my office!  It is a fantastic book that gives real insight into cold war era social policy in the Soviet Union... good stuff.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 04, 2008, 02:40:51 PM
http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2008/08/police-call-pub.html


Quote
   

Gene Costin       
COSTIN, Gene Born in Louisville, KY November 25, 1927. Gene Costin moved with his parents at the age of 12 to Los Angeles and loved this community. He lived a full and accomplished life. As a young man Gene devolped interests in politics and astronomy and closely followed developments in both areas throughout his life. He was a passionate civil libertarian and supporter of many liberal causes and other charities. He was well known in the two-way radio communications business and renowned to radio hobbyists nationwide for Police Call, which he published under the name Gene C. Hughes. After retirement he served long hours as a volunteer at the LAPD, for which he received a Volunteer of the Year award from the State of California. He was loved and will be missed by a wonderful family- his devoted wife Mitzi, three children, and their spouses-Cathy Costin (Mitchell Reback), Robert Costin (Yves Yarborox), and John Costin (Rachel Phipps). He was proud of his four grandchildren, Isaac Reback, Mia Reback, Silas Phipps-Costin, and Judah Phipps-Costin, and he adored his dog Murray. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Tower Cancer Research Foundation or a charity of your choice. Services will be private at Gene's request.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 09, 2008, 08:21:44 PM
shit...this is a surprise.


Quote
'Original King' comic actor Bernie Mac dies

    * Story Highlights
    * 'Original King of Comedy,' 50, dies after bout with pneumonia
    * Mac known for self-named TV series, movie roles, standup act
    * He turned tough Chicago upbringing into material for his act
    * Films included 'Ocean's' series, 'Bad Santa,' 'Charlie's Angels'

CHICAGO, Illinois (AP) -- Bernie Mac, the actor and comedian who teamed up in the casino heist caper "Ocean's Eleven" and gained a prestigious Peabody Award for his sitcom "The Bernie Mac Show," died Saturday at age 50.

"Actor/comedian Bernie Mac passed away this morning from complications due to pneumonia in a Chicago area hospital," his publicist, Danica Smith, said in a statement from Los Angeles.

The comedian suffered from sarcoidosis, an inflammatory lung disease that produces tiny lumps of cells in the body's organs, but had said the condition went into remission in 2005. He recently was hospitalized and treated for pneumonia, which his publicist said was not related to the disease.

Mac's brand of comedy caught flak when he was heckled during a surprise appearance at a July fundraiser for Democratic presidential candidate and fellow Chicagoan Barack Obama.

Toward the end of a 10-minute standup routine, Mac joked about menopause, sexual infidelity and promiscuity, and used occasional crude language. The performance earned him a rebuke from Obama's campaign. VideoWatch how Steve Harvey remembers Bernie Mac »

But despite controversy or difficulties, in his words, Mac was always a performer.

"Wherever I am, I have to play," he said in 2002. "I have to put on a good show."

Mac worked his way to Hollywood success from an impoverished upbringing on Chicago's South Side. He began doing standup as a child, and his film career started with a small role as a club doorman in the Damon Wayans comedy "Mo' Money" in 1992. In 1996, he appeared in the Spike Lee drama "Get on the Bus."

He was one of "The Original Kings of Comedy" in the 2000 documentary of that title that brought a new generation of black standup comedy stars to a wider audience.

"The majority of his core fan base will remember that when they paid their money to see Bernie Mac ... he gave them their money's worth," Steve Harvey, one of his co-stars in "Original Kings," said Saturday.

Mac went on to star in the hugely popular "Ocean's Eleven" franchise with Brad Pitt and George Clooney.

Comedian Carl Reiner, who also appeared in "Ocean's Eleven" and its two sequels, said Saturday that he was "in utter shock," because he thought Mac was improving. "He was just so alive. I can't believe he's gone," he said. iReport.com: Share your appreciation for Bernie Mac

Reiner told KNX-AM in Los Angeles that other comics had talked to the audience as Mac did on "The Bernie Mac Show," but "he took it to a new level."

"It was such a popular show because of his bigger-than-life persona," Reiner said.

His turn with Ashton Kutcher in 2005's "Guess Who" topped the box office. It was a comedy remake of the classic Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn drama "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?" with Mac as the black dad who's shocked that his daughter is marrying a white man.

Mac also had starring roles in "Bad Santa," "Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle" and "Transformers."

The comedian drew critical and popular acclaim with his Fox television series "The Bernie Mac Show," which aired more than 100 episodes from 2001 to 2006.

The series about a man's adventures raising his sister's three children won a Peabody Award in 2002. At the time, judges wrote they chose the sitcom for transcending "race and class while lifting viewers with laughter, compassion -- and cool."

In real life, he was very much like his character on that series, his daughter, Je'niece Childress, told The Associated Press on Saturday.

"He was the king of his household," Childress said in Chicago, describing Mac as "a loving grandfather" to her daughter, his only grandchild.

"The Bernie Mac Show" garnered Golden Globe and Emmy nominations for Mac.

"But television handcuffs you, man," he said in 2001. "Now everyone telling me what I CAN'T do, what I CAN say, what I SHOULD do, and asking, 'Are blacks gonna be mad at you? Are whites gonna accept you?"'

He also was nominated for a Grammy award for best comedy album in 2001 along with his "The Original Kings of Comedy" co-stars, Harvey, D.L. Hughley and Cedric the Entertainer.

Chicago music producer Carolyn Albritton said she was Bernie Mac's first manager, having met him in 1991 at Chicago's Cotton Club, where she hosted an open-mike night.

"From very early on, I thought he was destined for success," Albritton said Saturday. "He never lost track of where he came from, and he'd often use real life experiences, his family, his friends, in his routine. After he made it, he stayed a very humble man. His family was the most important thing in the world to him."

In 2007, Mac told David Letterman on CBS' "Late Show" that he planned to retire soon.

"I'm going to still do my producing, my films, but I want to enjoy my life a little bit," Mac told Letterman. "I missed a lot of things, you know. I was a street performer for two years. I went into clubs in 1977."

Mac was born Bernard Jeffrey McCullough on October 5, 1957, in Chicago. He grew up on the city's South Side, living with his mother and grandparents. His grandfather was the deacon of a Baptist church.

In his 2004 memoir, "Maybe You Never Cry Again," Mac wrote about having a poor childhood -- eating bologna for dinner -- and a strict, no-nonsense upbringing.

"I came from a place where there wasn't a lot of joy," Mac said in 2001. "I decided to try to make other people laugh when there wasn't a lot of things to laugh about."

Mac's mother died of cancer when he was 16. In his book, Mac said she was a support for him and told him he would surprise everyone when he grew up.

"Woman believed in me," he wrote. "She believed in me long before I believed."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Tatertots on August 10, 2008, 12:51:30 AM
Yeah, fuck. I watched some of his early stand-up and, damn, he was good. I wish I had paid more attention to his early stuff. I didn't like his current work too much.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 10, 2008, 09:07:37 AM
Quote
SUFFOLK, Virginia (AP) -- Anthony J. Russo, a researcher who helped leak the Vietnam-era Pentagon Papers to the media and prompted wider public questioning of the war, has died, police said.

Russo, 71, died in his native Suffolk on Wednesday, police records technician Susan Hart said Sunday. The cause of death was not immediately made public.

The case that became known as the Pentagon Papers helped put the Vietnam War on trial.

It began when Daniel Ellsberg, a top military analyst disillusioned with American policy, decided to release a top-secret, 47-volume Defense Department study of the U.S. role in Indochina over three decades. Russo helped him reproduce and distribute copies of the study.

Ellsberg first offered the study to several members of Congress and government officials before deciding to leak it to newspapers. His action was branded by President Richard Nixon as treason.

The government initially tried to stop publication of the Pentagon Papers, first in The New York Times and then in The Washington Post, prompting a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision barring prior restraint of free expression.

Ellsberg and Russo were subsequently charged with espionage, theft and conspiracy for the leak. As co-defendants, they subsequently went on trial in Los Angeles, where the papers had been copied.

But in 1973, a federal judge dismissed the case, ruling that the government was guilty of misconduct, including a break-in at the office of Ellsberg's Beverly Hills psychiatrist denounced as having been orchestrated by White House officials seeking to discredit him.

The Times reported on its Web site Sunday that Russo "chafed being called the 'Xerox aide"' because of his long nights spent copying and reproducing the classified study's thousands of pages.

Russo, a Rand Corp. researcher, visited Vietnam for a study involving interrogating Viet Cong prisoners. He came back radicalized.

"I knew what I was told about the war was totally false," he said.

Ellsberg met Russo in Saigon in 1965 and they were both troubled by what they saw during their research there.

"In 1968 I came back and Dan was across the hall at Rand," Russo recalled. "He had been a total hawk in Vietnam. But everything about him seemed shattered. It was as if he was trying to grow himself back. He was going through a metamorphosis. ... He was very tortured. There was no way he could justify the war anymore."

Ellsberg went on to become an anti-war icon. Russo, retired as a researcher for Los Angeles County, subsequently devoted himself to anti-nuclear issues and led Persian Gulf War protests.

Ellsberg mourned Russo's death in a posting on an anti-war blog linked to his official Web site. He called him a courageous collaborator.

"I knew that he was the one person with the combination of guts and passionate concern about the war who would take the risk of helping me," Ellsberg wrote.

It was not immediately known if Russo had any survivors. Funeral arrangements were unknown.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on August 10, 2008, 01:57:48 PM
A true American hero.  Took the epic risk.  Underappreciated.  We need more "treasonous" heroes.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 10, 2008, 07:48:17 PM
Rough weekend . . .

Quote
Hayes, 'Shaft' singer and disco presage, dies

MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Isaac Hayes, the baldheaded, baritone-voiced soul crooner who laid the groundwork for disco and whose "Theme From Shaft" won both Academy and Grammy awards, died Sunday afternoon after he collapsed near a treadmill, authorities said. He was 65.

Hayes was pronounced dead at Baptist East Hospital in Memphis an hour after he was found by a family member, the Shelby County Sheriff's Office said. The cause of death was not immediately known.

With his muscular build, shiny head and sunglasses, Hayes cut a striking figure at a time when most of his contemporaries were sporting Afros. His music, which came to be known as urban-contemporary, paved the way for disco as well as romantic crooners like Barry White.

And in his spoken-word introductions and interludes, Hayes was essentially rapping before there was rap. His career hit another high in 1997 when he became the voice of Chef, the sensible school cook and devoted ladies man on the animated TV show "South Park."

"Isaac Hayes embodies everything that's soul music," Collin Stanback, an A&R executive at Stax, told The Associated Press on Sunday. "When you think of soul music you think of Isaac Hayes — the expression ... the sound and the creativity that goes along with it."

Hayes was about to begin work on a new album for Stax, the soul record label he helped build to legendary status. And he had recently finished work on a movie called "Soul Men" in which he played himself, starring Samuel Jackson and Bernie Mac, who died on Saturday.

Steve Shular, a spokesman for the sheriff's office, said authorities received a 911 call after Hayes' wife and young son and his wife's cousin returned home from the grocery store and found him collapsed in a downstairs bedroom. A sheriff's deputy administered CPR until paramedics arrived.

"The treadmill was running but he was unresponsive lying on the floor," Shular said.

The album "Hot Buttered Soul" made Hayes a star in 1969. His shaven head, gold chains and sunglasses gave him a compelling visual image.

"Hot Buttered Soul" was groundbreaking in several ways: He sang in a "cool" style unlike the usual histrionics of big-time soul singers. He prefaced the song with "raps," and the numbers ran longer than three minutes with lush arrangements.

"Jocks would play it at night," Hayes recalled in a 1999 Associated Press interview. "They could go to the bathroom, they could get a sandwich, or whatever."

Next came "Theme From Shaft," a No. 1 hit in 1971 from the film "Shaft" starring Richard Roundtree.

"That was like the shot heard round the world," Hayes said in the 1999 interview.

At the Oscar ceremony in 1972, Hayes performed the song wearing an eye-popping amount of gold and received a standing ovation. TV Guide later chose it as No. 18 in its list of television's 25 most memorable moments. He won an Academy Award for the song and was nominated for another one for the score. The song and score also won him two Grammys.

"The rappers have gone in and created a lot of hit music based upon my influence," he said. "And they'll tell you if you ask."

Hayes was elected to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2002.

"I knew nothing about the business, or trends and things like that," he said. "I think it was a matter of timing. I didn't know what was unfolding."

A self-taught musician, he was hired in 1964 by Stax Records of Memphis as a backup pianist, working as a session musician for Otis Redding and others. He also played saxophone.

He began writing songs, establishing a songwriting partnership with David Porter, and in the 1960s they wrote such hits for Sam and Dave as "Hold On, I'm Coming" and "Soul Man."

All this led to his recording contract.

In 1972, he won another Grammy for his album "Black Moses" and earned a nickname he reluctantly embraced. Hayes composed film scores for "Tough Guys" and "Truck Turner" besides "Shaft." He also did the song "Two Cool Guys" on the "Beavis and Butt-Head Do America" movie soundtrack in 1996. Additionally, he was the voice of Nickelodeon's "Nick at Nite" and had radio shows in New York City (1996 to 2002) and then in Memphis.

He was in several movies, including "It Could Happen to You" with Nicolas Cage, "Ninth Street" with Martin Sheen, "Reindeer Games" starring Ben Affleck and the blaxploitation parody "I'm Gonna Git You, Sucka."

In the 1999 interview, Hayes described the South Park cook as "a person that speaks his mind; he's sensitive enough to care for children; he's wise enough to not be put into the 'wack' category like everybody else in town — and he l-o-o-o-o-ves the ladies."

But Hayes angrily quit the show in 2006 after an episode mocked his Scientology religion.

"There is a place in this world for satire," he said. "but there is a time when satire ends and intolerance and bigotry toward religious beliefs of others begins."

Co-creator creators Matt Stone responded that Hayes "has no problem — and he's cashed plenty of checks — with our show making fun of Christians." A subsequent episode of the show seemingly killed off the Chef character.

Hayes was born in 1942 in a tin shack in Covington, Tenn., about 40 miles north of Memphis. He was raised by his maternal grandparents after his mother died and his father took off when he was 1 1/2. The family moved to Memphis when he was 6.

Hayes wanted to be a doctor, but got redirected when he won a talent contest in ninth grade by singing Nat King Cole's "Looking Back."

He held down various low-paying jobs, including shining shoes on the legendary Beale Street in Memphis. He also played gigs in rural Southern juke joints where at times he had to hit the floor because someone began shooting.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 10, 2008, 08:11:08 PM
Jesus... another shocker.  Maybe it's the Rapture.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on August 11, 2008, 02:49:29 AM
maybe something happened working on that movie??  Poison, stress, accidentally seeing a mafia boss with his pants down?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 11, 2008, 07:19:59 AM
Are you saying the truth is that Isaac Hayes also took the role of the Joker too seriously and overdosed on vitamin C and sugar pills?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 11, 2008, 09:08:00 AM
Hayes and Mac both had health problems.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 11, 2008, 09:24:50 AM
Everyone in this thread has a health problem!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 12, 2008, 09:21:41 AM
Quote
British actor Terence Rigby has died. He was 71.

The star, who is most famous for his roles in Get Carter and Bond movie Tomorrow Never Dies, lost his battle with lung cancer at his London home last week (Beg4Aug08).

Rigby became well known in his native England following his starring roles in popular TV series Softly, Softly: Task Force and the BBC's 1980s adaptation of Sherlock Holmes tale, The Hound of the Baskervilles.

His other film roles included Elizabeth and as the voice of Silver in beloved animated children's tale Watership Down.

Rigby began his career in the theatre, attending the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts alongside legendary British TV actor John Thaw.

The actor went on to direct a string of shows in London's West End, most recently Waiting for Godot in 2005.

A spokesman for Rigby says, "He will be sorely missed. There are not so many like him any more. He was a very powerful character actor, able to play villains and nice roles with ease."

Rigby had no immediate survivors.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 12, 2008, 12:29:09 PM
Quote
Geoffrey Ballard, 75, Fuel-Cell Pioneer Who Created Bus Powered by Hydrogen, Dies
By JEREMY PEARCE

Geoffrey Ballard, a Canadian entrepreneur whose company became a bellwether in the use of hydrogen fuel cells to power cars and other vehicles, helping lead the struggle to diminish the role of the gasoline engine, died on Aug. 2 in North Vancouver. He was 75.

The cause was complications of liver disease, his family said.

With a flourish in 1993, Dr. Ballard and his company, Ballard Power Systems of Burnaby, British Columbia, unveiled a small city bus that generated no harmful emissions and was completely powered by hydrogen.

At the heart of the project was a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell, a device that peeled electrons from hydrogen to run the bus’s electric motor while creating water as a byproduct. With Keith Prater, Paul F. Howard and others, Dr. Ballard had been working to increase the power and reduce the size of the fuel cell since the early 1980s.

Although similar fuel-cell technology had been used by General Motors and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in the 1960s, Ballard Power’s successful application in earthbound vehicles proved to be influential.

Dr. Ballard picked a hydrogen-fueled bus as a marketing tool to demonstrate a possible use of the fuel cell. In the end, the auto companies seized the idea and helped steer fuel-cell technology in their own direction.

In 1997, the German automaker Daimler invested about $320 million in Ballard Power Systems, and the Ford Motor Company put in $420 million more. Other auto companies, concerned about being left behind, began their own research into fuel cells working on methanol.

In 2002, Dr. Ballard, a geophysicist by training, reflected on the surge of interest. “Nobody was really too enthusiastic about the fuel cell at first,” he said. “But when you put a hydrogen fuel cell in something and then drive it around — well, it’s pretty hard to argue with that.”

Yet he also acknowledged hydrogen’s well-documented problems: a lack of infrastructure to supply the fuel, production costs at least 10 times greater than for a comparable gasoline engine and an environmental price in the form of the large electrical output needed to produce hydrogen. And as Dr. Ballard was also often reminded, leaking hydrogen can be dangerously volatile.

For personal reasons, he left Ballard Power in the late 1990s and helped to form another company, General Hydrogen of Vancouver, a product-development firm, at which he promoted the use of fuel cells in warehouse forklifts and other vehicles. Despite the predictions of energy analysts and the auto industry itself, which made claims for broad use of fuel cells in cars by the year 2000, a hydrogen vehicle for the average consumer has not yet appeared.

Tom Koppel, a science writer who wrote a book about the development of the hydrogen fuel cell, “Powering the Future: The Ballard Fuel Cell and the Race to Change the World” (1999), said that Dr. Ballard and his colleagues “kick-started and expedited the movement, which initially had very little money.”

Dr. Koppel continued: “They showed the fuel cell could be improved, made more compact and powerful, at relatively little cost, and that the hydrogen economy was a long-term concept for governments to aspire to.”

Geoffrey Edwin Hall Ballard was born in Niagara Falls, Ontario. He earned his doctorate in earth and planetary sciences from Washington University in St. Louis, in 1962.

Dr. Ballard is survived by his wife of 52 years, Shelagh. The couple lived in West Vancouver. He is also survived by three sons, Curtis of Vancouver, Edward of North Vancouver and Mark of West Vancouver; two sisters, Shirley Dolby of St. Catharines, Ontario, and Nancy Jones of Edmonton, Alberta; and eight grandchildren.

While waiting for fuel-cell cars to arrive in North American driveways, Dr. Ballard remained stalwart in his belief in the superiority of hydrogen over petroleum-based fuels. He argued that governments would have to adopt the new technology and make “experimental fleets” of vehicles before economy of scale would ever make it affordable for consumers.

“What sort of problems are we going to create?” he said in 2003. “I doubt that I will ever see a hydrogen car for personal consumption in a showroom.”

But, he added, he did hope to survive long enough to see “the fleets change, the army vehicles, taxis, trucks and rental cars.”
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 12, 2008, 12:33:35 PM
Oh, wow.  Two more. 

New American Review is a cornerstone in modern lit. 

Quote
Ted Solotaroff, 79; Literary Critic Started a Journal

By Joe Holley
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, August 12, 2008; B06

Ted Solotaroff, 79, a writer, critic and editor who founded New American Review, an influential literary journal in the 1960s and 1970s, and who helped shape the works of prominent writers while at Harper & Row publishers, died Aug. 8 at his home in East Quogue, N.Y., of complications from pneumonia.

A "man of letters" in the tradition of Edmund Wilson, Alfred Kazin and Lionel Trilling, Mr. Solotaroff was "one of the last of the great editors," said novelist and short-story writer Bobbie Ann Mason.

Mr. Solotaroff was an editor and critic at the opinion journal Commentary before starting New American Review in 1967. The paperback literary journal, later called American Review, published E.L. Doctorow, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, William H. Gass and Donald Barthelme, among others. He also ran an early excerpt from what became Philip Roth's novel "Portnoy's Complaint."

"Ted Solotaroff's taste in fiction has proved to be something of a national resource," author John Romano wrote in a 1978 issue of the New York Times Book Review, shortly before American Review ceased publication.

"It was the great regret of his life that he didn't push harder to keep it going," said his son Paul Solotaroff. He said Bantam, which funded the magazine, "was pushing hard to shut it down. It wasn't bringing in the novels that would grow out of these pieces being published in the journal."

Mr. Solotaroff produced two volumes of critical essays before writing about his own life in two well-received books.

"Truth Comes in Blows" (1998) tells the story of his childhood in Depression-era New Jersey and his troubled relationship with a cold, demanding father. A second volume, "First Loves" (2004), picks up the story in the late 1940s. The title alludes to two loves in Mr. Solotaroff's life: one romantic, the other literary.

Theodore Solotaroff was born Oct. 9, 1928, into a working-class Jewish family in Elizabeth, N.J. His father, the owner of Ben's Standard Plate Glass Co., was a difficult man who represented, as Mr. Solotaroff wrote, "that sort of driving energy that established the Jewish middle class."

His father was also cruel and vindictive, he wrote. At 5, Ted Solotaroff fell off a swing and broke his nose, but his father refused to take him to a doctor. The youngster suffered with "the patch of ugliness" that was his nose -- until at 18, he borrowed money from an aunt to have the nose reset.

His mother, gentle and artistic, often bore the brunt of her husband's rage and bitterness, and Ted Solotaroff often felt compelled to protect her. He also helped out after school in his father's shop. He hated the work.

The family escaped Elizabeth and moved to suburban Elmora, N.J., where Mr. Solotaroff's love of sports, particularly baseball, began to morph into competition of a different sort. "In the league I played in now -- the Jewish one -- the high scoring was in English, math, social studies and science," he wrote in "Truth Comes in Blows."

As a University of Michigan freshman, the first story he ever wrote won a campus fiction prize. He received his undergraduate degree in 1952 and then became a graduate student at the University of Chicago, where he befriended aspiring novelist Philip Roth, also a New Jersey native with Jewish working-class roots.

Mr. Solotaroff's growing awareness of his friend's prodigious talent -- even as a graduate student -- extinguished his own long-nurtured aspirations to write fiction.

"The difference," he wrote in "First Loves," "wasn't a matter of mode or taste: it seemed simply, starkly, that of ability, like the difference between an actor who can play any role . . . and one who can't."

He received his master's degree from the University of Chicago in 1956 and began to build his own literary career, first at Commentary from 1960 to 1966 and then at his own magazine.

At Harper & Row, where he was senior editor from 1979 to 1991, he edited Russell Banks, Sue Miller, Robert Bly and other writers. Mr. Solotaroff worked with Bobbie Ann Mason on her first novel, "In Country" (1986).

Mason said it took her several months to realize that the novel she was contemplating was about Vietnam. "He encouraged me to confront the subject and not sidestep it," she said.

In 1989, when Rupert Murdoch bought Harper & Row, Mr. Solotaroff began to do less editing and more writing. He moved from Manhattan to East Quogue, a tranquil village on Long Island, and he plunged into rediscovering his early life.

He left the book business with a parting shot at what he labeled "the literary-industrial complex."

Book publishing, he wrote in a 1987 issue of the New Republic magazine, "has largely sold out its cultural purpose to a commercial one, thereby losing the vision and the energy and the realism that guided and empowered publishers like Knopf, Cerf . . . and others."

He found some satisfaction in the fact that his own pension tripled in value because the bidding war between Murdoch and fellow media magnate Robert Maxwell propelled the stock upward.

He was working on the third volume of his memoirs at the time of his death.

His marriages to Lynn Friedman, Shirley Fingerhood and Ghislaine Boulanger ended in divorce.


And...we lost the Great Escape guy:


Quote
Eric 'Digger' Dowling, 92; POW Helped Others Flee

By Jill Lawless
Associated Press
Tuesday, August 12, 2008; B05

Eric Dowling, 92, nicknamed "Digger" for helping excavate tunnels used in the breakout from a World War II German prison camp that became known as the "Great Escape," died July 21 at a nursing home near Bristol in southwest England. No cause of death was reported.

Mr. Dowling played a key role in planning the 1944 escape by 76 prisoners from Stalag Luft III prison near Sagan in eastern Germany -- now Zagan, Poland. He forged documents, made maps and helped dig three tunnels code-named "Tom," "Dick" and "Harry."

The daring breakout was one of the most celebrated incidents of the war and inspired the 1963 film "The Great Escape," starring Steve McQueen and Richard Attenborough.

All but three of the escapees were recaptured, and 50 of them were shot on the orders of Adolf Hitler to deter future attempts.

Over almost a year, prisoners surreptitiously dug the tunnels 30 feet underground, shored up with bed boards and wired with stolen electrical wire. Tom was discovered by guards, and Dick was abandoned, but the 300-foot-long Harry tunnel was eventually completed.

Mr. Dowling was not among the more than 200 prisoners chosen by lottery to make the escape attempt on the cold and moonless night of March 24. By the time German guards discovered the breakout, 76 men had crawled free.

Son Peter Dowling said his father was not a fan of the Hollywood movie.

"He wasn't the greatest admirer of Americans, and it didn't go down too easily that one of them should be playing the starring role," Peter Dowling said. "Parts of it he acknowledged were quite realistic, but then he felt it turned into something that was completely untrue."

He said his father thought the scene in which McQueen attempts to race to freedom on a stolen motorcycle "was well over the top."

"A lot of the reality of digging tunnels was left out, too," his son said.

Many of the film's characters were composites of real people. Peter Dowling said the one that most resembled his father was a flight lieutenant nicknamed "The Forger," played by Donald Pleasance.

Flight Lt. Eric Dowling was born in southwest England in 1915 and flew 29 missions as a navigator with the Royal Air Force's Bomber Command. He was shot down in April 1942 and sent to the prison camp for Allied airmen.

After the war, Mr. Dowling served as an RAF air-accident investigator and later worked for British Aerospace on the supersonic Concorde jet.

His wife, Agnes Marie, died in 1997.

In addition to his son, he is survived by a daughter.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on August 20, 2008, 03:38:39 PM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26303502/

Quote
Rep. Tubbs Jones dies after brain aneurysm
Cleveland newspaper reports Democrat's death


EAST CLEVELAND, Ohio - Rep. Stephanie Tubbs Jones died at a Cleveland hospital Wednesday after suffering a brain aneurysm, according to The Cleveland Plain Dealer.

Tubbs Jones, 58, was taken to the Cleveland Clinic's Huron Hospital in East Cleveland late Tuesday, said hospital spokeswoman Joyce Persuad.

Cleveland television stations reported Wednesday that the congresswoman was taken to the hospital after police found her in a car along a road in Cleveland Heights. Police Chief Martin Lentz did not immediately return a message seeking comment Wednesday.

Tubbs Jones was first elected in 1998, becoming the first black woman to represent Ohio in Congress.

She was set to be a superdelegate at next week's Democratic National Convention in Denver. She was one of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's biggest boosters during the primaries, then threw her support to Sen. Barack Obama in June.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on August 20, 2008, 03:41:49 PM
I'm not really a Dave Matthews fan, but this still sucks.

Quote
Sax player in Dave Matthews Band has died
LeRoi Moore, 46, died from complications of June ATV crash


LeRoi Moore, the versatile saxophonist whose signature staccato fused jazz and funk overtones onto the eclectic sound of the Dave Matthews Band, died Tuesday of complications from injuries he suffered in an all-terrain vehicle accident, the band said. He was 46.

Moore died at Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center, where he was admitted with complications that arose weeks after the June 30 wreck, according to a statement on the band’s Web site. It did not specify what led to his death, and nursing supervisor Galina Shinder said the hospital could not release details.

On June 30, Moore crashed his ATV on his farm outside Charlottesville, Va., but was discharged and returned to his Los Angeles home to begin physical therapy. Complications forced him back to the hospital on July 17, the band said.

The band went on with its show Tuesday night at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, where lead singer Dave Matthews acknowledged Moore’s death to the crowd after the first song.

“It’s always easier to leave than be left,” Matthews told the crowd, according to Ambrosia Healy, the band’s publicist. “We appreciate you all being here.”

Saxophonist Jeff Coffin, who played with Bela Fleck and the Flecktones, had been sitting in for Moore during the band’s summer tour.

Moore, who wore dark sunglasses at the bands’ many live concerts, had classical training but said jazz was his main musical influence, according to a biography on the band’s Web site.

“But at this stage I don’t really consider myself a jazz musician,” Moore said in the biography. Playing with the Dave Matthews Band was “almost better than a jazz gig,” he said. “I have plenty of space to improvise, to try new ideas.”

Lead singer Dave Matthews credited Moore with arranging many of his songs, which combine Cajun fiddle-playing, African-influenced rhythms and Matthews’ playful but haunting voice.

The band formed in 1991 in Charlottesville, Va., when Matthews was working as a bartender. He gave a demo tape of his songs to Moore, who liked what he heard and recruited his friend and fellow jazzman Carter Beauford to play drums, and other musicians.

The group broke out of the local music scene with the album “Under the Table and Dreaming.” The band won a Grammy Award in 1997 for its hit song “So Much to Say” off its second album “Crash.” Other hits include “What Would You Say,” “Crash Into Me” and “Satellite.”
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 20, 2008, 03:45:50 PM
ATV's, man.  Those things are killers.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on August 20, 2008, 03:51:16 PM
Apparently so!  One almost got Ozzy a couple of years ago.  I'm curious about this one though because they discharged him and everything, so he must have appeared to be ok?  It's kind of strange.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on August 20, 2008, 03:52:42 PM
Also there are now conflicting reports about Tubbs Jones... it seems like she's either dead or in very critical condition.  The death reports may have been premature though.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 20, 2008, 03:54:09 PM
Apparently so!  One almost got Ozzy a couple of years ago.  I'm curious about this one though because they discharged him and everything, so he must have appeared to be ok?  It's kind of strange.

Oh, well, the seven years of serious heroin intake was part of the accident, right?

Also there are now conflicting reports about Tubbs Jones... it seems like she's either dead or in very critical condition.  The death reports may have been premature though.

Yeah, CNN has her alive.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on August 20, 2008, 04:26:47 PM
LeRoi Moore had some badass chops all the way around.  When I saw him play with DMB at Jazzfest, he played several intruments.  He switched between several saxes and a flute and, if I remember right, he also played the violin and a clarinet and at least one other instrument, sometimes switching mid-song.

DMB, in my opinion, is no more.  The live Tim Reynolds and Dave Matthews album was OK, even good.  But this guy was the soul, and I have to believe his musicianship forged those songs that I loved. 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 20, 2008, 04:28:38 PM
Quote
BEIJING - Hua Guofeng, who briefly ruled China as communist founder Mao Zedong's successor but was quickly pushed aside in the prelude to reforms that launched the country's economic boom, died Wednesday at the age of 87, the state-run media reported.

State broadcaster CCTV said that Hua died of an unspecified illness.

He took power after Mao's death in September 1976, but saw his powers erode until Deng Xiaoping took control two years later. Hua was forced out as Communist party chairman in 1981 and slipped into obscurity.

In contrast to the harsh purges of earlier eras, when fallen leaders were banished to remote villages, Hua remained part of the inner circle as a member of the party's Central Committee.

Shortly after Hua took power, Mao's widow, Jiang Qing, and other members of the Gang of Four were arrested, marking the end of the violent 1966-76 Cultural Revolution. But it wasn't clear whether Hua played a part in the arrests.

When he was forced out as party leader in 1981, one stated reason was that Hua had continued to espouse the ultraradical ideals of the Cultural Revolution.

Little is known about Hua's final years. Some reports said he resigned from the party for health reasons in 2001, the year he turned 80, but the government didn't confirm that.

Born to a poor family in 1921, Hua became a guerrilla fighter in Mao's communist movement at 15 when it was battling for survival against Chiang Kai-shek's ruling Nationalists.

After the 1949 revolution, Hua served in provincial government and party posts until he was named to the Central Committee in 1969. He became party secretary of Hunan, Mao's home province, the following year.

Hua was named vice-premier in 1975 and then premier, succeeding the late Zhou Enlai.

After Mao's death, as rival factions struggled for power, Hua became a compromise candidate to head the party. Mao was said to have told him, "With you in charge, I'm at ease."

Hua was described in the official media as "the wise" leader, a step below Mao, the former "great leader."

When Hua took power, China was in the grip of the Cultural Revolution, launched by Mao as an attack on potential rivals. Millions were persecuted while the economy was pushed to the brink of collapse.

The arrests of the Gang of Four symbolically ended the era of upheaval and self-imposed isolation.

Hua made a highly publicized trip to Eastern Europe in 1978 and visited Britain the next year.

But Deng, who saw Hua as an obstacle to his economic plans, already was manoeuvring to replace him. Deng had been purged in Mao's final years but was restored to his official posts in July 1977.

Hua was effectively stripped of his powers at a party meeting in December 1978. The same gathering approved Deng's "reform and opening" policy legalizing small-scale private farms, the first step in what became China's successful capitalist reform program.

Hua resigned as premier in September 1980 and was replaced by economist Zhao Ziyang, a Deng protege. The following year, Deng had Hua replaced as party secretary general by Hu Yaobang.

Both Zhao and Hu would later be dismissed by Deng - Hu in the mid-1980s after he was blamed for allowing student protests, and Zhao after the 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy demonstrations.

Early state media reports credited Hua with presiding over the downfall of the Gang of Four.

But by February 1979, papers quoted him as saying he wanted the "wise leader" tag dropped. In December 1980, he no longer was credited with the "Gang of Four" arrest.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 21, 2008, 11:44:21 AM
Okay, Tubbs-Jones is official.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 26, 2008, 04:17:46 PM
Quote
'100 Things' co-author dies at 47
Writer of the travel guide and ode to odd adventures fell and hit his head
The Associated Press
updated 10:42 a.m. ET, Tues., Aug. 26, 2008

Dave Freeman, co-author of “100 Things to Do Before You Die,” a travel guide and ode to odd adventures that inspired readers and imitators, died after hitting his head in a fall at his home. He was 47.

Freeman died Aug. 17 after the fall at his Venice home, his father, Roy Freeman, told the Los Angeles Times on Monday.

An advertising agency executive, Freeman co-wrote the 1999 book subtitled “Travel Events You Just Can't Miss” with Neil Teplica. It was based on the Web site whatsgoingon.com, which the pair ran together from 1996 to 2001.

“This life is a short journey,” the book says. “How can you make sure you fill it with the most fun and that you visit all the coolest places on earth before you pack those bags for the very last time?”

Freeman's relatives said he visited about half the places on his list before he died, and either he or Teplica had been to nearly all of them.

“He didn't have enough days, but he lived them like he should have,” Teplica said.

The book's recommendations ranged from the obvious — attending the Academy Awards and running with the bulls in Pamplona, Spain — to the more obscure — taking a voodoo pilgrimage in Haiti and “land diving” on the Island of Vanuatu, which Freeman once called “the original bungee jumping.”

It included goofy graphics with each entry, indicating that some activities were “down and dirty,” and others “grandma friendly.”

The success of “100 Things” inspired dozens of like-minded books, with titles such as “100 Things Project Managers Should Do Before They Die” and “100 Things Cowboys Fans Should Know and Do Before They Die.”

Freeman graduated from the University of Southern California in 1983, briefly working for an ad agency in Newport Beach before moving to New York to work for Grey Advertising.

On Sept. 11, 2001, Freeman watched the second plane hit the World Trade Center from his apartment just blocks away. He moved back to Southern California to be closer to his family.

Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

URL: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26404649/
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on August 26, 2008, 04:22:49 PM
fail.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 02, 2008, 03:35:01 PM
Quote
Don LaFontaine, a voiceover artist known to many as "King of Voiceovers," died Monday in Los Angeles. He was 68.

A 25-year veteran of the industry, LaFontaine was the preeminent voice of movie trailers, and also voiced popular shows like Entertainment Tonight, the Insider and hundreds of spots for radio and television. His other work included commercials for McDonalds, Budweiser and voiceover work for all the major television networks. According to reports, he worked on nearly 5,000 films – and was the in-show announcer for the Screen Actors Guild and Academy Awards.

LaFontaine's agent confirms to Entertainment Tonight that he passed away from Pneumothorax, the presence of air or gas in the pleural cavity which house the lungs. The official cause of death has not been released.

Most recently, LaFontaine stepped into the spotlight, parodying himself in a series of television commercials for Geico.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 02, 2008, 03:57:05 PM
IN A WORLD
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Tatertots on September 02, 2008, 04:16:56 PM
Different guy, but one of my favorite trailers of all time:

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Tatertots on September 02, 2008, 04:18:53 PM
Also:

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 02, 2008, 04:47:31 PM
awwwwww.... dammit.

Quote
NASHVILLE, Tennessee (AP) -- Jerry Reed, a singer who became a good ol' boy actor in car chase movies like "Smokey and the Bandit," has died of complications from emphysema at 71.

His longtime booking agent, Carrie Moore-Reed, no relation to the star, said Reed died early Monday.

"He's one of the greatest entertainers in the world. That's the way I feel about him," Moore-Reed said.

Reed was a gifted guitarist who later became a songwriter, singer and actor.

As a singer in the 1970s and early 1980s, he had a string of hits that included "Amos Moses," "When You're Hot, You're Hot," "East Bound and Down" and "The Bird."

In the mid-1970s, he began acting in movies such as "Smokey and the Bandit" with Burt Reynolds, usually as a good ol' boy. But he was an ornery heavy in "Gator," directed by Reynolds, and a hateful coach in 1998's "The Waterboy," starring Adam Sandler.

Reynolds gave him a shiny black 1980 Trans Am like the one they used in "Smokey and the Bandit."

Reed and Kris Kristofferson paved the way for Nashville music personalities to make inroads into films. Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson and Kenny Rogers (TV movies) followed their lead.

"I went around the corner to motion pictures," he said in a 1992 AP interview.

Reed had quadruple bypass surgery in June 1999.

Born in Atlanta, Reed learned to play guitar at age 8 when his mother bought him a $2 guitar and showed him how to play a G-chord.

He dropped out of high school to tour with Ernest Tubb and Faron Young.

At 17, he signed his first recording contract, with Capitol Records.

He moved to Nashville in the mid-1960s where he caught the eye of Chet Atkins.

He first established himself as a songwriter. Elvis Presley recorded two of his songs, "U.S. Male" and "Guitar Man" (both in 1968). He also wrote the hit "A Thing Called Love," which was recorded in 1972 by Johnny Cash. He also wrote songs for Brenda Lee, Tom Jones, Dean Martin, Nat King Cole and the Oak Ridge Boys.

Reed was voted instrumentalist of the year in 1970 by the Country Music Association.

He won a Grammy Award for "When You're Hot, You're Hot" in 1971. A year earlier, he shared a Grammy with Chet Atkins for their collaboration, "Me and Jerry." In 1992, Atkins and Reed won a Grammy for "Sneakin' Around."

Reed continued performing on the road into the late 1990s, doing about 80 shows a year.

"I'm proud of the songs, I'm proud of things that I did with Chet (Atkins), I'm proud that I played guitar and was accepted by musicians and guitar players," he told the AP in 1992.

In a 1998 interview with The Tennessean, he admitted that his acting ability was questionable.

"I used to watch people like Richard Burton and Mel Gibson and think, 'I could never do that.'

"When people ask me what my motivation is, I have a simple answer: Money."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 03, 2008, 06:53:41 AM
That does suck.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on September 03, 2008, 12:35:27 PM
I missed this one.  Excellent toublemaker.  A smidge more anarchist than I am.  I only have one album of his -- a collaberation

Quote
The offical Obituary as provided by the family. May 24, 2008

"Folksinger, Storyteller, Railroad Tramp Utah Phillips Dead at 73"
Nevada City, California:

Utah Phillips, a seminal figure in American folk music who performed extensively and tirelessly for audiences on two continents for 38 years, died Friday of congestive heart failure in Nevada City, California a small town in the Sierra Nevada mountains where he lived for the last 21 years with his wife, Joanna Robinson, a freelance editor.

Born Bruce Duncan Phillips on May 15, 1935 in Cleveland, Ohio, he was the son of labor organizers. Whether through this early influence or an early life that was not always tranquil or easy, by his twenties Phillips demonstrated a lifelong concern with the living conditions of working people. He was a proud member of the Industrial Workers of the World, popularly known as "the Wobblies," an organizational artifact of early twentieth-century labor struggles that has seen renewed interest and growth in membership in the last decade, not in small part due to his efforts to popularize it.

Phillips served as an Army private during the Korean War, an experience he would later refer to as the turning point of his life. Deeply affected by the devastation and human misery he had witnessed, upon his return to the United States he began drifting, riding freight trains around the country. His struggle would be familiar today, when the difficulties of returning combat veterans are more widely understood, but in the late fifties Phillips was left to work them out for himself. Destitute and drinking, Phillips got off a freight train in Salt Lake City and wound up at the Joe Hill House, a homeless shelter operated by the anarchist Ammon Hennacy, a member of the Catholic Worker movement and associate of Dorothy Day.

Phillips credited Hennacy and other social reformers he referred to as his "elders" with having provided a philosophical framework around which he later constructed songs and stories he intended as a template his audiences could employ to understand their own political and working lives. They were often hilarious, sometimes sad, but never shallow.

"He made me understand that music must be more than cotton candy for the ears," said John McCutcheon, a nationally-known folksinger and close friend. In the creation of his performing persona and work, Phillips drew from influences as diverse as Borscht Belt comedian Myron Cohen, folksingers Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger, and Country stars Hank Williams and T. Texas Tyler.

A stint as an archivist for the State of Utah in the 1960s taught Phillips the discipline of historical research; beneath the simplest and most folksy of his songs was a rigorous attention to detail and a strong and carefully-crafted narrative structure. He was a voracious reader in a surprising variety of fields. Meanwhile, Phillips was working at Hennacy's Joe Hill house. In 1968 he ran for a seat in the U.S. Senate on the Peace and Freedom Party ticket. The race was won by a Republican candidate, and Phillips was seen by some Democrats as having split the vote. He subsequently lost his job with the State of Utah, a process he described as "blacklisting."

Phillips left Utah for Saratoga Springs, New York, where he was welcomed into a lively community of folk performers centered at the Caffé Lena, operated by Lena Spencer. "It was the coffeehouse, the place to perform. Everybody went there. She fed everybody," said John "Che" Greenwood, a fellow performer and friend. Over the span of the nearly four decades that followed, Phillips worked in what he referred to as "the Trade," developing an audience of hundreds of thousands and performing in large and small cities throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe. His performing partners included Rosalie Sorrels, Kate Wolf, John McCutcheon and Ani DiFranco.

"He was like an alchemist," said Sorrels, "He took the stories of working people and railroad bums and he built them into work that was influenced by writers like Thomas Wolfe, but then he gave it back, he put it in language so the people whom the songs and stories were about still had them, still owned them. He didn't believe in stealing culture from the people it was about."

A single from Phillips's first record, "Moose Turd Pie," a rollicking story about working on a railroad track gang, saw extensive airplay in 1973. From then on, Phillips had work on the road. His extensive writing and recording career included two albums with Ani DiFranco which earned a Grammy nomination. Phillips's songs were performed and recorded by Emmylou Harris, Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez, Tom Waits, Joe Ely and others. He was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Folk Alliance in 1997.

Phillips, something of a perfectionist, claimed that he never lost his stage fright before performances. He didn't want to lose it, he said; it kept him improving. Phillips began suffering from the effects of chronic heart disease in 2004, and as his illness kept him off the road at times, he started a nationally syndicated folk-music radio show, "Loafer's Glory," produced at KVMR-FM and started a homeless shelter in his rural home county, where down-on-their-luck men and women were sleeping under the manzanita brush at the edge of town. Hospitality House opened in 2005 and continues to house 25 to 30 guests a night. In this way, Phillips returned to the work of his mentor Hennacy in the last four years of his life.

Phillips died at home, in bed, in his sleep, next to his wife. He is survived by his son Duncan and daughter-in-law Bobette of Salt Lake City, son Brendan of Olympia, Washington; daughter Morrigan Belle of Washington, D.C.; stepson Nicholas Tomb of Monterrey, California; stepson and daughter-in-law Ian Durfee and Mary Creasey of Davis, California; brothers David Phillips of Fairfield, California, Ed Phillips of Cleveland, Ohio and Stuart Cohen of Los Angeles; sister Deborah Cohen of Lisbon, Portugal; and a grandchild, Brendan. He was preceded in death by his father Edwin Phillips and mother Kathleen, and his stepfather, Syd Cohen.

The family requests memorial donations to Hospitality House, P.O. Box 3223, Grass Valley, California 95945 (530) 271-7144 www.hospitalityhouseshelter.org
   homepage:: http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2008/05/24/18502004.php   
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on September 03, 2008, 12:52:24 PM
Utah Philips -- 7th in a series of 7 from his 2007 performance

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 09, 2008, 09:34:26 AM
Diane Webber died on August 19th, and it seems to not have really sunk in yet.  Wikipedia reflects it, but few other places do.  Nor can I find a good obit.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marguerite_Empey

She was a huge 60's nudie-flick star.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 09, 2008, 02:12:08 PM
Quote
The Dalai Lama's older brother Thubten J. Norbu died Friday in Indiana, USA. In exile in the US since 1959, Norbu had always voiced strong opposition to Chinese rule in Tibet and supported independence, not autonomy, for his homeland. When he was three, Norbu was recognized by a previous Dalai Lama as the reincarnation of the high lama Takster Rinpoche. Despite their stark differences in character, personality and political opinion, Norbu had always referred to his brother as "His Holiness" and leader of the Tibetans in interviews with the media.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 09:48:50 AM
http://www.edrants.com/gregory-mcdonald-dead/


Quote
Gregory McDonald Dead
Written by Edward Champion

Posted on September 9, 2008
Filed Under Fletch, Obits, mcdonald-gregory

Giles News is reporting that Gregory McDonald, the tremendously talented author of the Fletch series has died. I am now making efforts to confirm this. If this is true, this is a tremendous loss to American letters.

[UPDATE: I have confirmed by phone with Charlie of the Giles County Ambulance Service that Gregory McDonald passed away on Sunday. As soon as I have a chance to collect my thoughts and feelings, I plan to offer a full-length tribute here. I'm still in shock.]

I first encountered the Fletch books in the library when I was twelve. The ratty paperbacks were bound in taut cellophane. I didn’t understand why they hadn’t been released in hardcover. But as it turned out, there were complex reasons. I had, of course, known about the Chevy Chase movie. But Chase’s wisecracks (as conveyed through Andrew Bergman’s screenplay) weren’t even close to McDonald’s great barbs. The first Fletch book was driven almost entirely by dialogue, keeping up a momentum that sucked me into the text. The story goes that mystery purists were upset that McDonald published the Fletch books as paperback originals. They were also angered that McDonald had used sex and wit to draw readers into his novels. But McDonald wanted ordinary people to read them. McDonald’s Fletch books, however, were far from ordinary.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: vernae on September 10, 2008, 10:13:29 AM
T. Norbu, Dalai Lama’s Brother, Dies at 86

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/09/world/asia/09norbu.html?ref=obituaries

I thought he was the only child.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 10:17:39 AM
Two above your post!  But you have the better obit linked.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: vernae on September 10, 2008, 10:20:43 AM
Two above your post!  But you have the better obit linked.

LOL! I tried to contribute, maybe I should read first and post later.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2008, 10:22:45 AM
No, no, you actually linked the obit.  You contributed!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 14, 2008, 04:37:47 PM
Wow...surprising.

Quote
September 14, 2008
Postmodern Writer Is Found Dead at Home
By TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
David Foster Wallace, whose darkly ironic novels, essays and short stories garnered him a large following and made him one of the most influential writers of his generation, was found dead in his California home on Friday, after apparently committing suicide, the authorities said.

Mr. Wallace, 46, best known for his sprawling 1,079-page novel “Infinite Jest,” was discovered by his wife, Karen Green, who returned home to find that he had hanged himself, a spokesman for the Claremont, Calif., police said Saturday evening.

Mr. Wallace was a professor in the English department at Pomona College in Claremont.

“I know a great novelist has left the scene, but we knew him as a great teacher who cared deeply about his students, who treasured him. That’s what we’re going to miss,” said Gary Kates, the dean of Pomona College.

Mr. Wallace had taught at the small liberal arts college since 2002 and held the school’s Roy Edward Disney Chair in Creative Writing. He taught one or two classes each semester of about 12 students each, Mr. Kates said.

Mr. Wallace burst onto the literary scene in the 1990s with a style variously described as “pyrotechnic” and incomprehensible, and it was compared to those of writers including Jorge Luis Borges, Thomas Pynchon and Don DeLillo.

His opus, “Infinite Jest,” published by Little, Brown & Company in 1996, is set in the near future, in a time called the Year of the Depend Adult Undergarment and is, roughly, about addiction and how the need for pleasure and entertainment can interfere with human connection.

In a New York Times review of the book, Jay McInerney wrote that the novel’s “skeleton of satire is fleshed out with several domestically scaled narratives and masses of hyperrealistic quotidian detail.”

“The overall effect.” Mr. McInerney continued, “is something like a sleek Vonnegut chassis wrapped in layers of post-millennial Zola.”

The novel was filled with references to high and low culture alike, and at the end had more than 100 pages of footnotes, which were trademarks of Mr. Wallace’s work.

The blurbs are by contemporary novelists like Jonathan Franzen and Rick Moody, each of whom was a friend of Mr. Wallace.

Michael Pietsch, who edited “Infinite Jest,” said Saturday night that the literary world had lost one of its great talents.

“He had a mind that was constantly working on more cylinders than most people, but he was amazingly gentle and kind,” Mr. Pietsch said. “He was a writer who other writers looked to with awe.”

Mr. Wallace was born in Ithaca, N.Y. His father, James Donald Wallace, was a philosophy professor at the University of Illinois, and his mother taught English at a community college in Champaign, Ill.

Mr. Wallace majored in philosophy at Amherst College and had planned on embarking on a career in mathematics or philosophy. But after graduation in 1987, he enrolled in the creative writing program at the University of Arizona, where he wrote his first novel, “The Broom of the System,” which was praised by critics.

He followed a year later with a collection of short stories, “Girl with Curious Hair,” which cemented his reputation as a master of the postmodern. Eight years later returned with “Infinite Jest,” which became a literary sensation.

“It was ironic, but at the same time it was attempting to take emotional risk,” said Kathleen Fitzpatrick, chair of the media studies department at Pomona College, who knew Mr. Wallace. “A lot of contemporary literature uses irony as a self-protective gesture, but he never did that. He was like a lot of postmodern novelists, but braver.”

Mr. Pietsch said although Mr. Wallace’s work was complex and layered, it was his sense of humor that kept people reading.

“He wrote showstoppers,” Mr. Pietsch said. “He was brilliantly funny. People stayed with these long, complicated novels because they made them laugh."

Among his other works are “Brief Interviews with Hideous Men,” a short story collection, and “A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again,” a collection of essays.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 15, 2008, 02:16:45 PM
Quote
Pink Floyd’s Richard Wright Dies at 65
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Filed at 12:47 p.m. ET

LONDON (AP) -- A Pink Floyd spokesman says founding member Richard Wright has died. He was 65.

Wright died Monday after a battle with cancer at his home in Britain. His family did not want to give more details about his death. The spokesman is Doug Wright, who is not related to the artist.

Richard Wright met Pink Floyd members Roger Waters and Nick Mason at college and joined their early band Sigma 6.

Sigma 6 eventually became Pink Floyd and Wright wrote and sang some of the band's key songs. He wrote ''The Great Gig In The Sky'' and ''Us And Them'' from Pink Floyd's 1973 ''The Dark Side Of The Moon.''

He left the group in the early 1980s to form his own band but rejoined Pink Floyd for their 1987 album ''A Momentary Lapse of Reason.''
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 15, 2008, 02:24:09 PM
Wow, that's huge...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 15, 2008, 02:28:11 PM
Quote
Peter Camejo; Nader's Running Mate in 2004

By Judy Lin
Associated Press
Monday, September 15, 2008; B06

Peter Camejo, 68, a Green Party leader who was a third-party candidate in three California gubernatorial elections before becoming Ralph Nader's running mate in the 2004 presidential race, died Sept. 13 of lymphoma at his home in Folsom, Calif.

Mr. Camejo ran for the state's top office in 2002, 2003 and 2006, supporting abortion rights, universal health care and a moratorium on the death penalty. Before joining the Green Party, he also ran for president as the Socialist Workers Party nominee in 1976.

In 2004, Mr. Camejo was independent candidate Nader's vice-presidential pick.

"Peter was a friend, colleague and politically courageous champion of the downtrodden and mistreated of the entire Western Hemisphere," Nader wrote in a statement. "Everyone who met Peter, talked to Peter, worked with Peter or argued with Peter will miss the passing of a great American."

Mr. Camejo, a first-generation Venezuelan American, also was active against the Vietnam War and a vocal advocate for migrant workers' rights. He marched in Selma, Ala., with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

In 1967, his activism also got him expelled from the University of California at Berkeley for using a school microphone during a demonstration. A year later, then-Gov. Ronald Reagan put him on his list of the 10 most dangerous people in California, because he was "present at all anti-war demonstrations."

Last month, Mr. Camejo attended the Peace and Freedom Party Convention in Sacramento to endorse Nader's current bid for the presidency with running mate Matt Gonzalez.

"Ralph Nader is more than a candidate, he's an issue," Mr. Camejo said in his Aug. 2 speech, adding that Nader brought true reform, offering an independent choice to the "ruling party."

Nader said Mr. Camejo passed away a few days after completing his autobiography, which has a working title of "Northstar."

According to a statement by Mr. Camejo's family on a blog that had been updating his condition, Camejo voluntarily returned home Friday after treatment at UC Davis Medical Center in Sacramento for a recurrence of lymphoma.

Survivors include his wife, Morella Camejo of Folsom; two children, Alexandra Camejo and Victor Camejo; three brothers; and three grandchildren.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on September 15, 2008, 04:44:54 PM
Wow to all three.  I was hoping from more from Wallace.  Broom of the System is still my favorite of his, although Hideous Men might be as good or better if the subject matter left me less squeamish.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Matt on September 27, 2008, 04:06:16 PM
Paul Newman died yesterday.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 27, 2008, 04:27:20 PM
Yep, I'd heard he was sick a while back.  I saw a picture of him maybe 3 months ago and he looked really, really skinny.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 28, 2008, 10:34:56 PM
Paul Newman died yesterday.

3 isn't bad though. Still, he was Cool Hand Luke . . .
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 03, 2008, 11:51:41 AM
Time to bust out some CD's tonight and have a few drinks.

Quote
Kingston Trio co-founder Reynolds dies


SAN DIEGO, California (AP) -- Nick Reynolds, a founding member of the Kingston Trio who jump-started the revival folk scene of the late 1950s and paved the way for artists such as Bob Dylan and Joan Baez, has died. He was 75.

Reynolds had been hospitalized with acute respiratory disease and other illnesses, and died Wednesday in San Diego after his family took him off life support, said son Joshua Reynolds.

"Dad was so happy he turned people onto music in a way that people could really approach it, in a simple and honest way," Josh Reynolds told The Associated Press. "He was a very gracious and loving performer. He was a devoted family man."

The Kingston Trio's version of the 19th-century folk song "Tom Dooley" landed the group a No. 1 spot on the charts in 1958, and launched the band's career.

Born on July 27, 1933, in San Diego, Nicholas Reynolds demonstrated an early love of music and did sing-alongs with his two sisters and their Navy captain-father, who taught him to play guitar.

He graduated from Coronado High School in 1951 and attended the University of Arizona and San Diego State University before attending Menlo College, a business school near Palo Alto. He graduated from Menlo in 1956.

It was during the mid-1950s that Nicholas Reynolds met Bob Shane, who introduced him to Stanford student Dave Guard. Guard and Shane knew each other from playing music in Guard's native Hawaii. The three formed the Kingston Trio.

In 1958, "Tom Dooley" earned Reynolds, Guard and Shane a trophy for best country and western performance at the first Grammys. The group, defined by tight harmonies and a clean-cut style, went on to win a Grammy the next year for best folk performance for its album "The Kingston Trio At Large."

Later member John Stewart joined the group in 1961, replacing Guard. Stewart died in January, also in San Diego.

After leaving the Kingston Trio in 1967, Reynolds moved to Oregon, where he stayed until the 1980s and took a break from music to raise his family, his son said.

Reynolds moved back to California in the mid-1980s and rejoined Stewart for one album. In 1991, Reynolds rejoined Shane in a reconstituted version of the Trio. He remained with the group until retiring in 2003, his son said.

Reynolds is survived by his wife Leslie, sons Joshua and John Pike Reynolds, daughters Annie Reynolds Moore and Jennifer Reynolds, and his two sisters.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 15, 2008, 08:47:45 PM
Quote
LOS ANGELES (Oct. 15) - Neal Hefti, a Big Band trumpeter, arranger and composer of themes for the movie "The Odd Couple" and the "Batman" television series, has died. He was 85.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neal_Hefti

http://splashpage.mtv.com/2008/10/15/tvs-batman-theme-song-composer-neal-hefti-rip/

I am not inspired to watch Batman again...but I'm always in the mood for some Odd Couple laughs!



Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 27, 2008, 09:59:15 AM
Lots of obit stuff at the link:
http://www.sarahweinman.com/confessions/2008/10/tony-hillerman.html


Quote
Tony Hillerman Dies at 83

Tony Hillerman, the award-winning author of many works of fiction and non-fiction - primarily the Leaphorn/Chee novels - passed away yesterday. He was 83, and the cause of death was pulmonary failure. According to the AP, Hillerman's daughter, Anne Hillerman, said her father's health had been declining in the last couple years and that he was at Presbyterian Hospital in Albuquerque when he died at about 3 p.m yesterday. He is survived by his wife, Marie and six children.

Deanne Stillman has a wonderful tribute to Hillerman at LA Observed, as does Henry Kisor, and Marilyn Stasio writes the obituary for the New York Times.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 28, 2008, 10:41:11 AM
Quote
'Deep Throat' director dead at 80


MIAMI (AP) -- Gerard Damiano, director of the pioneering pornographic film that lent its name to the Watergate whistleblower known as "Deep Throat," has died. He was 80.

Damiano died Saturday at a Fort Myers hospital, his son, Gerard Damiano Jr., said Monday. He had suffered a stroke in September.

"He was a filmmaker and an artist and we thought of him as such," the younger Damiano said. "Even though we weren't allowed to see his movies, we knew he was a moviemaker, and we were proud of that."

Damiano's "Deep Throat" was a mainstream box-office success and helped launch the modern hardcore adult-entertainment industry. Shot in six days for just $25,000, the 1972 flick became a cultural must-see for Americans who had just lived through the sexual liberation of the 1960s.

The film's title also became associated with one of the most famous anonymous sources in journalism.

While investigating the Watergate scandal, Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein used it as a nickname for their source, former FBI official W. Mark Felt. Information from Felt helped bring down Richard Nixon's presidency.

Born in New York in 1928, Damiano worked as a hairdresser, spent time in the Navy and directed several adult films. The younger Damiano said he would often accompany his father on film sets as a child, but would be ushered out during "nitty-gritty" scenes.

"We weren't allowed to see certain parts of it," the son said. "But my parents always felt that it was nothing to be ashamed of, what he did."

After "Deep Throat" opened in Times Square, attention from media critics and outraged conservatives -- including repeated legal challenges -- helped turn it into a hit.

"My father never dreamed that it would get that kind of attention," the younger Damiano said.

But despite the attention, the son said the film was not his father's favorite.

"He was fond of it for what it was, but in terms of filmmaking, he would never call it a great film," he said.

Gerard Damiano is survived by his son and daughter. No formal services are planned.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: saintangelsin on October 28, 2008, 04:12:17 PM
While I know it's insignificant, this week I'll be writing my first obituary to be published. Not like I'm looking forward to this actually. At 9 am central time today, my aunt (who I traveled to Nashville to see this past August) finally passed away from her brain tumor.

About a month ago, I told my cousins that I could write the obituary for them and they seemed to have liked that idea. I figured it was the least I could do for them. We'll see how this goes. Though I know my aunt's passing was inevitable, it just still hurts.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Goblin_Queen on October 29, 2008, 04:19:46 PM
Strange, my grandmother's sister died yesterday morning, almost exactly a year to the date of my grandmother's passing.  This will be my third obituary.  I'm trying to figure out which is more depressing, the funeral of a loving matriarch, or that of her spinster sister?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 01, 2008, 08:36:54 PM
Quote
American writer and radio personality Studs Terkel has died at the age of 96.

The Pulitzer Prize-winner and actor passed away at his home in Chicago, Illinois on Friday.

The star was best known for his oral documentaries on World War II and the Great Depression, recording interviews with ordinary Americans and producing a cross-section of U.S. society.

Terkel's son Dan has paid tribute to his father, saying, "He lived a long, eventful, satisfying, though sometimes tempestuous life. I think that pretty well sums it up."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 01, 2008, 09:38:55 PM
Quote
Swiss 'Captain Nemo' explorer Jacques Piccard dies at 86

GENEVA (AFP) – Swiss deep sea explorer and inventor Jacques Piccard, who holds the record for travelling to the deepest point underwater, died Saturday at the age of 86, a statement said.

"One of the last great explorers of the 20th century, a true Captain Nemo who went deeper than any other man, Jacques Piccard passed away on Saturday, ... at his home on the edge of his beloved Lake Geneva," it said.

Piccard, who was born in Brussels, together with Don Walsh reached the bottom of the Mariana Trench, 10,916 metres (35,813 feet) below sea level on January 23, 1960 -- the farthest point underwater.

He also witnessed living organisms at a depth of over 11,000 metres below sea level, a discovery that led to a ban in nuclear waste dumping into the ocean.

Piccard had also built four mid-depth submarines, including the first tourist submarine that carried 33,000 passengers deep into Lake Geneva in 1964 and carried on deep sea exploration up to the age of 82.

Piccard's father Auguste Piccard twice beat the record for reaching the highest altitude in a balloon, in 1931-32.

"He passed on to me a sense of curiosity, a desire to mistrust dogmas and common assumptions, a belief in free-will, and confidence in the face of the unknown," Piccard's son Bertrand said in a statement released by Solar Impulse, a solar aeroplane project in which he is involved.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 05, 2008, 02:51:23 PM
This really depresses me.

Quote
Family: Michael Crichton dies of cancer

NEW YORK – The family of Michael Crichton, the million-selling author of such historic and prehistoric science fantasies as "Jurassic Park," "Timeline" and "The Andromeda Strain," says the author has died in Los Angeles.

Crichton died Tuesday at age 66. He had been privately battling cancer, his family said.

"Through his books, Michael Crichton served as an inspiration to students of all ages, challenged scientists in many fields, and illuminated the mysteries of the world in a way we could all understand," his family said in a statement.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on November 05, 2008, 03:17:03 PM
awwww, damn. :(
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 12, 2008, 08:06:33 PM
I'm not trying to poke fun, but isn't this dude about 35 years late on his OD?

Quote
Drummer for Jimi Hendrix found dead

PORTLAND, Ore. – Mitch Mitchell, drummer for the legendary Jimi Hendrix Experience of the 1960s and the group's last surviving member, was found dead in his hotel room early Wednesday. He was 61.

Mitchell was a powerful force on "Are You Experienced?" the 1967 debut album of the Hendrix band. He had an explosive drumming style that can be heard in hard-charging songs such as "Fire" and "Manic Depression."

The Englishman had been drumming for the Experience Hendrix Tour, which performed Friday in Portland. It was the last stop on the West Coast part of the tour.

Hendrix died in 1970. Noel Redding, bass player for the trio, died in 2003.

An employee at Portland's Benson Hotel called police after discovering Mitchell's body.

Erin Patrick, a deputy medical examiner, said Mitchell apparently died of natural causes. An autopsy was planned.

Bob Merlis, a spokesman for the tour, said Mitchell had stayed in Portland for a four-day vacation and planned to leave Wednesday.

"It was a devastating surprise," Merlis said. "Nobody drummed like he did."

He said he saw Mitchell perform two weeks ago in Los Angeles, and the drummer appeared to be healthy and upbeat.

Merlis said the tour was designed to bring together veteran musicians who had known Hendrix — like Mitchell — and younger artists, such as Grammy-nominated winner Jonny Lang, who have been influenced by him.

Mitchell was a one-of-a-kind drummer whose "jazz-tinged" style was a vital part of both the Jimi Hendrix Experience and the Experience Hendrix Tour that ended last week, Merlis said. "If Jimi Hendrix were still alive," Merlis said, "he would have acknowledged that."

Mitchell played for numerous other bands but was best known for his work in the Jimi Hendrix Experience, which was inducted into the Rock Hall of Fame in 1992.

According to the Hall of Fame, he was born July 9, 1947, in Ealing, England.

Hendrix, Redding and Mitchell held their first rehearsal in October 1996, according to the Hall of Fame's Web site.

In an interview last month with the Boston Herald, Mitchell said he met Hendrix "in this sleazy little club."

"We did some Chuck Berry and took it from there," Mitchell told the newspaper. "I suppose it worked."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on November 12, 2008, 10:14:14 PM
hey, man, that guy was a genius!  and it says natural causes. 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 12, 2008, 10:19:41 PM
I'm going to invent a drug called "Natural Causes."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on November 12, 2008, 10:27:21 PM
nice try!  it's already called aspirin!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Tatertots on November 12, 2008, 10:44:23 PM
Sounds like an adult diaper brand.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 05, 2008, 06:42:36 PM
Quote from: horror-movies.ca
I am sad to report that horror has lost yet another icon. The editor of the magazine Famous Monsters in Filmland, Forrest J Ackerman succumbed to heart failure in his home on Thursday. He had recently celebrated his 92nd birthday.

He is widely credited with first coining the term "sci-fi" as well as being the one who discovered authur Ray Bradbury.

He was also the owner of a giant collection of sci-fi/fantasy/horror memorabilia including, but not limited to, 50,000 books as well as the cape worn by Bela Lugosi in Dracula (1931). 

A true lover of all things genre related as well as an icon in his own right, Mr.  Ackerman will be missed by fans the world over.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 12, 2008, 12:57:34 AM
85 is a good run, but this really makes me sad nonetheless.

Quote
1950s pinup model Bettie Page dies in LA at 85

Bettie Page, the 1950s secretary-turned-model whose controverisal photographs in skimpy attire or none at all helped set the stage for the 1960s sexual revolution, died Thursday. She was 85.

Page suffered a heart attack last week in Los Angeles and never regained consciousness, said her agent, Mark Roesler. Before the heart attack, Page had been hospitalized for three weeks with pneumonia.

"She captured the imagination of a generation of men and women with her free spirit and unabashed sensuality," Roesler said. "She is the embodiment of beauty."

Page, who was also known as Betty, attracted national attention with magazine photographs of her sensuous figure in bikinis and see-through lingerie that were quickly tacked up on walls in military barracks, garages and elsewhere, where they remained for years.

Her photos included a centerfold in the January 1955 issue of then-fledgling Playboy magazine, as well as controversial sadomasochistic poses.

"I think that she was a remarkable lady, an iconic figure in pop culture who influenced sexuality, taste in fashion, someone who had a tremendous impact on our society," Playboy founder Hugh Hefner told The Associated Press on Thursday. "She was a very dear person."

Page mysteriously disappeared from the public eye for decades, during which time she battled mental illness and became a born-again Christian.

After resurfacing in the 1990s, she occasionally granted interviews but refused to allow her picture to be taken.

"I don't want to be photographed in my old age," she told an interviewer in 1998. "I feel the same way with old movie stars. ... It makes me sad. We want to remember them when they were young."

The 21st century indeed had people remembering her just as she was. She became the subject of songs, biographies, Web sites, comic books, movies and documentaries. A new generation of fans bought thousands of copies of her photos, and some feminists hailed her as a pioneer of women's liberation.

Gretchen Mol portrayed her in 2005's "The Notorious Bettie Page" and Paige Richards had the role in 2004's "Bettie Page: Dark Angel." Page herself took part in the 1998 documentary "Betty Page: Pinup Queen."

Hefner said he last saw Page when he held a screening of "The Notorious Bettie Page" at the Playboy Mansion. He said she objected to the fact that the film referred to her as "notorious," but "we explained to her that it referred to the troubled times she had and was a good way to sell a movie."

Page's career began one day in October 1950 when she took a respite from her job as a secretary in a New York office for a walk along the beach at Coney Island. An amateur photographer named Jerry Tibbs admired the 27-year-old's firm, curvy body and asked her to pose.

Looking back on the career that followed, she told Playboy in 1998: "I never thought it was shameful. I felt normal. It's just that it was much better than pounding a typewriter eight hours a day, which gets monotonous."

Nudity didn't bother her, she said, explaining: "God approves of nudity. Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, they were naked as jaybirds."

In 1951, Page fell under the influence of a photographer and his sister who specialized in S&M. They cut her hair into the dark bangs that became her signature and posed her in spiked heels and little else. She was photographed with a whip in her hand, and in one session she was spread-eagled between two trees, her feet dangling.

"I thought my arms and legs would come out of their sockets," she said later.

Moralists denounced the photos as perversion, and Sen. Estes Kefauver of Tennessee, Page's home state, launched a congressional investigation.

Page quickly retreated from public view, later saying she was hounded by federal agents who waved her nude photos in her face. She also said she believed that, at age 34, her days as "the girl with the perfect figure" were nearly over.

She moved to Florida in 1957 and married a much younger man, as an early marriage to her high school sweetheart had ended in divorce.

Her second marriage also failed, as did a third, and she suffered a nervous breakdown.

In 1959, she was lying on a sea wall in Key West when she saw a church with a white neon cross on top. She walked inside and became a born-again Christian.

After attending Bible school, she wanted to serve as a missionary but was turned down because she had been divorced. Instead, she worked full-time for evangelist Billy Graham's ministry.

A move to Southern California in 1979 brought more troubles.

She was arrested after an altercation with her landlady, and doctors who examined her determined she had acute schizophrenia. She spent 20 months in a state mental hospital in San Bernardino.

A fight with another landlord resulted in her arrest, but she was found not guilty because of insanity. She was placed under state supervision for eight years.

"She had a very turbulent life," Todd Mueller, a family friend and autograph seller, told The Associated Press on Thursday. "She had a temper to her."

Mueller said he first met Page after tracking her down in the 1990s and persuaded her to do an autograph signing event.

He said she was a hit and sold about 3,000 autographs, usually for $200 to $300 each.

"Eleanor Roosevelt, we got $40 to $50. ... Bettie Page outsells them all," he told The AP last week.

Born April 22, 1923, in Nashville, Tenn., Page said she grew up in a family so poor "we were lucky to get an orange in our Christmas stockings."

The family included three boys and three girls, and Page said her father molested all of the girls.

After the Pages moved to Houston, her father decided to return to Tennessee and stole a police car for the trip. He was sent to prison, and for a time Betty lived in an orphanage.

In her teens she acted in high school plays, going on to study drama in New York and win a screen test from 20th Century Fox before her modeling career took off.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on December 12, 2008, 02:23:06 AM
"a family friend and autograph seller"

those phrases don't belong together. 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 12, 2008, 09:38:00 AM
Bettie Page was still alive?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on December 13, 2008, 10:06:38 PM
i wondered that myself. i  always assumed she had OD'd in the 60s.  how can you have a biopic when you're still alive? 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 14, 2008, 01:00:50 AM
She didn't age well at all, so she was pretty reclusive.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on December 15, 2008, 02:29:29 AM
or should've never been famous....?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on December 15, 2008, 07:31:46 AM
Why no links of her modelling photos?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 15, 2008, 02:45:34 PM
Just Google "Bettie Page" and watch them stream in.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 18, 2008, 09:57:03 PM
Quote
Majel Barrett-Roddenberry passed away in her home at 12:27am this morning after a battle with leukemia. She was 76 years old.

Majel was with STAR TREK since before most of the world knew what STAR TREK was, since before she married TREK creator Gene Roddenberry. She played "Number One", Captain Christopher Pike's First Officer, in "The Cage" (an unaired TREK pilot later cannibalized as flashback fodder for an Original Series episode called "The Menagerie"). She also appeared as Nurse Christine Chapel in THE ORIGINAL SERIES - Dr. Leonard "Bones" McCoy's stalwart sidekick whose crush on Spock provided many memorable, and amusing, moments.

After THE ORIGINAL SERIES, she voiced various characters on STAR TREK: THE ANIMATED SERIES, and appeared in Gene Roddenberry produced fare like PLANET EARTH, GENESIS II, SPECTRE, and THE QUESTOR TAPES . She played Lwaxana Troi (Deanna Troi's flamboyant, man-craving mother) in STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION - as well as providing the voice for the Enterprise computer in that series. She would reprise bioth the computer and Troi roles in STAR TREKs DEEP SPACE NINE, VOYAGER, multiple TREK films, and was recently announced to be voicing the Enterprise computer in J.J. Abrams' forthcoming STAR TREK movie. It's not clear if Majel recorded her role before passing (J.J.'s previous statements indicated the film would more-or-less be in the can by now, so it seems likely she did. More on this as we know more...)

Barrett's acting career was not limited to STAR TREK, and included BABYLON 5, WESTWORLD, and even GENERAL HOSPITAL. After Gene's passing in 1991, Majel perpetuated his legacy by developing/producing Gene-"concepts" like EARTH: FINAL CONFLICT and ANDROMEDA.

There was something comfortably assuring and fazmiliar when Barrett's association with Abrams' new TREK was announced - I was looking forqward to hearing that voice again . Over the decades, TREK has seen many permutations, and underghone many tribulations. But having her there always made TREK feel a little more comfortable. A little more like...home.

She will be missed.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 18, 2008, 10:18:56 PM
Wow...that's actually quite sad.  I didn't even know she was sick.

Glad she got to voice the computers in the reboot.  She's been with the franchise longer than Shatner.  She will be missed.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 19, 2008, 09:56:47 AM
Quote
Mark Felt, Watergate's `Deep Throat,' dies at 95

SAN FRANCISCO – W. Mark Felt, the former FBI second-in-command who revealed himself as "Deep Throat" 30 years after he tipped off reporters to the Watergate scandal that toppled a president, has died. He was 95.

Felt died Thursday in Santa Rosa after suffering from congestive heart failure for several months, said family friend John D. O'Connor, who wrote the 2005 Vanity Fair article uncovering Felt's secret.

The shadowy central figure in one of the most gripping political dramas of the 20th century, Felt insisted his alter ego be kept secret when he leaked damaging information about President Richard Nixon and his aides to Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward.

While some — including Nixon and his aides — speculated that Felt was the source who connected the White House to the June 1972 break-in at the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee, he steadfastly denied the accusations until finally coming forward in May 2005.

"I'm the guy they used to call Deep Throat," Felt told O'Connor for the Vanity Fair article, creating a whirlwind of media attention.

Weakened by a stroke, the man who had kept his secret for decades wasn't doing much talking — he merely waved to the media from the front door of his daughter's Santa Rosa home.

Critics, including those who went to prison for the Watergate scandal, called him a traitor for betraying the commander in chief. Supporters hailed him as a hero for blowing the whistle on a corrupt administration trying to cover up attempts to sabotage opponents.

Felt grappled with his place in history, arguing with his children over whether to reveal his identity or to take his secret to the grave, O'Connor said. He agonized about what revealing his identity would do to his reputation. Would he be seen as a turncoat or a man of honor?

"People will debate for a long time whether I did the right thing by helping Woodward," Felt wrote in his 2006 memoir, "A G-Man's Life: The FBI, `Deep Throat' and the Struggle for Honor in Washington." "The bottom line is that we did get the whole truth out, and isn't that what the FBI is supposed to do?"

Ultimately, his daughter, Joan, persuaded him to go public; after all, Woodward was sure to profit by revealing the secret after Felt died. "We could make at least enough money to pay some bills, like the debt I've run up for the kids' education," she told her father, according to the Vanity Fair article. "Let's do it for the family."

The revelation capped a Washington whodunnit that spanned more than three decades and seven presidents. It was the biggest mystery of Watergate, the subject of the best-selling book and hit movie "All the President's Men," which inspired a generation of college students to pursue journalism.

It was by chance that Felt came to play a pivotal role in the drama.

Back in 1970, Woodward struck up a conversation with Felt while both were waiting in a White House hallway. Felt apparently took a liking to the young Woodward, then a Navy courier, and Woodward kept the relationship going, treating Felt as a mentor as he tried to figure out the ways of Washington.

Later, while Woodward and partner Carl Bernstein relied on various unnamed sources in reporting on Watergate, the man their editor dubbed "Deep Throat" helped to keep them on track and confirm vital information. The Post won a Pulitzer Prize for its Watergate coverage.

Within days of the burglary at Watergate that launched the Post's investigative series, Woodward phoned Felt.

"He reminded me how he disliked phone calls at the office but said that the Watergate burglary case was going to `heat up' for reasons he could not explain," Woodward wrote after Felt was named. "He then hung up abruptly."

Felt helped Woodward link former CIA man Howard Hunt to the break-in. He said the reporter could accurately write that Hunt, whose name was found in the address book of one of the burglars, was a suspect. But Felt told him off the record, insisting that their relationship and Felt's identity remain secret.

Worried that phones were being tapped, Felt arranged clandestine meetings worthy of a spy novel. Woodward would move a flower pot with a red flag on his balcony if he needed to meet Felt. The G-man would scrawl a time to meet on page 20 of Woodward's copy of The New York Times and they would rendezvous in a suburban Virginia parking garage in the dead of night.

In the movie, the enduring image of Deep Throat — a name borrowed from a 1972 porn movie — is of a testy, chain-smoking Hal Holbrook telling Woodward, played by Robert Redford, to "follow the money."

In a memoir published in April 2006, Felt said he saw himself as a "Lone Ranger" who could help derail a White House cover-up.

Felt wrote that he was upset by the slow pace of the FBI investigation into the Watergate break-in and believed the press could pressure the administration to cooperate.

"From the start, it was clear that senior administration officials were up to their necks in this mess, and that they would stop at nothing to sabotage our investigation," Felt wrote in his memoir.

Some critics said Felt, a J. Edgar Hoover loyalist, was bitter at being passed over when Nixon appointed an FBI outsider and confidante, L. Patrick Gray, to lead the FBI after Hoover's death. Gray was later implicated in Watergate abuses.

"We had no idea of his motivations, and even now some of his motivations are unclear," Bernstein said.

Felt wrote that he wasn't motivated by anger. "It is true that I would have welcomed an appointment as FBI director when Hoover died. It is not true that I was jealous of Gray," he wrote.

Felt was born in Twin Falls, Idaho, and worked for an Idaho senator during graduate school. After law school at George Washington University he spent a year at the Federal Trade Commission. Felt joined the FBI in 1942 and worked as a Nazi hunter during World War II.

Ironically, while providing crucial information to the Post, Felt also was assigned to ferret out the newspaper's source. The investigation never went anywhere, but plenty of people, including those in the White House at the time, guessed that Felt, who was leading the investigation into Watergate, may have been acting as a double agent.

The Watergate tapes captured White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman telling Nixon that Felt was the source, but they were afraid to stop him.

Nixon asks: "Somebody in the FBI?"

Haldeman: "Yes, sir. Mark Felt ... If we move on him, he'll go out and unload everything. He knows everything that's to be known in the FBI."

Felt left the FBI in 1973 for the lecture circuit. Five years later he was indicted on charges of authorizing FBI break-ins at homes associated with suspected bombers from the 1960s radical group the Weather Underground. President Ronald Reagan pardoned Felt in 1981 while the case was on appeal — a move applauded by Nixon.

Woodward and Bernstein said they wouldn't reveal the source's identity until he or she died, and finally confirmed Felt's role only after he came forward.

O'Connor said Thursday his friend appeared to be at peace since the revelation.

"What I saw was a person that went from a divided personality that carried around this heavy secret to a completely integrated and glowing personality over these past few years once he let the secret out," he said.

Felt is survived by two children, Joan Felt and Mark Felt Jr., and four grandchildren. His wife, Audrey Felt, died in 1984.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 25, 2008, 10:44:50 AM
Let's all take a "Pinter pause" for one of the greats.

Quote
Nobel-winning playwright Harold Pinter dies at 78

LONDON – The wife of Harold Pinter says the Nobel Prize-winning playwright has died after a long battle with throat cancer. He was 78.

His wife Antonia Fraser says Pinter, who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2005, died Wednesday.

She says: "It was a privilege to live with him for over 33 years. He will never be forgotten."

Pinter was praised as the most influential British playwright of his generation and a loud voice of protest in the political arena.

His distinctive contribution to the stage was enshrined in an adjective — "Pinteresque."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 25, 2008, 09:49:32 PM
And Eartha Kitt...

Quote
Eartha Kitt, sultry 'Santa Baby' singer, dies

By POLLY ANDERSON – 2 hours ago

NEW YORK (AP) — Eartha Kitt, a sultry singer, dancer and actress who rose from South Carolina cotton fields to become an international symbol of elegance and sensuality, has died, a family spokesman said. She was 81.

Andrew Freedman said Kitt, who was recently treated at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, died Thursday in Connecticut of colon cancer.

Kitt, a self-proclaimed "sex kitten" famous for her catlike purr, was one of America's most versatile performers, winning two Emmys and nabbing a third nomination. She also was nominated for several Tonys and two Grammys.

Her career spanned six decades, from her start as a dancer with the famed Katherine Dunham troupe to cabarets and acting and singing on stage, in movies and on television. She persevered through an unhappy childhood as a mixed-race daughter of the South and made headlines in the 1960s for denouncing the Vietnam War during a visit to the White House.

Through the years, Kitt remained a picture of vitality and attracted fans less than half her age even as she neared 80.

When her book "Rejuvenate," a guide to staying physically fit, was published in 2001, Kitt was featured on the cover in a long, curve-hugging black dress with a figure that some 20-year-old women would envy. Kitt also wrote three autobiographies.

Once dubbed the "most exciting woman in the world" by Orson Welles, she spent much of her life single, though brief romances with the rich and famous peppered her younger years.

After becoming a hit singing "Monotonous" in the Broadway revue "New Faces of 1952," Kitt appeared in "Mrs. Patterson" in 1954-55. (Some references say she earned a Tony nomination for "Mrs. Patterson," but only winners were publicly announced at that time.) She also made appearances in "Shinbone Alley" and "The Owl and the Pussycat."

Her first album, "RCA Victor Presents Eartha Kitt," came out in 1954, featuring such songs as "I Want to Be Evil," "C'est Si Bon" and the saucy gold digger's theme song "Santa Baby," which is revived on radio each Christmas.

The next year, the record company released follow-up album "That Bad Eartha," which featured "Let's Do It," "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" and "My Heart Belongs to Daddy."

In 1996, she was nominated for a Grammy in the category of traditional pop vocal performance for her album "Back in Business." She also had been nominated in the children's recording category for the 1969 record "Folk Tales of the Tribes of Africa."

Kitt also acted in movies, playing the lead female role opposite Nat King Cole in "St. Louis Blues" in 1958 and more recently appearing in "Boomerang" and "Harriet the Spy" in the 1990s.

On television, she was the sexy Catwoman on the popular "Batman" series in 1967-68, replacing Julie Newmar who originated the role. A guest appearance on an episode of "I Spy" brought Kitt an Emmy nomination in 1966.

"Generally the whole entertainment business now is bland," she said in a 1996 Associated Press interview. "It depends so much on gadgetry and flash now. You don't have to have talent to be in the business today.

"I think we had to have something to offer, if you wanted to be recognized as worth paying for."

Kitt was plainspoken about causes she believed in. Her anti-war comments at the White House came as she attended a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson.

"You send the best of this country off to be shot and maimed," she told the group of about 50 women. "They rebel in the street. They don't want to go to school because they're going to be snatched off from their mothers to be shot in Vietnam."

For four years afterward, Kitt performed almost exclusively overseas. She was investigated by the FBI and CIA, which allegedly found her to be foul-mouthed and promiscuous.

"The thing that hurts, that became anger, was when I realized that if you tell the truth — in a country that says you're entitled to tell the truth — you get your face slapped and you get put out of work," Kitt told Essence magazine two decades later.

In 1978, Kitt returned to Broadway in the musical "Timbuktu!" — which brought her a Tony nomination — and was invited back to the White House by President Jimmy Carter.

In 2000, Kitt earned another Tony nod for "The Wild Party." She played the fairy godmother in Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Cinderella" in 2002.

As recently as October 2003, she was on Broadway after replacing Chita Rivera in a revival of "Nine."

She also gained new fans as the voice of Yzma in the 2000 Disney animated feature "The Emperor's New Groove.'"

In an online discussion at Washingtonpost.com in March 2005, shortly after Jamie Foxx and Morgan Freeman won Oscars, she expressed satisfaction that black performers "have more of a chance now than we did then to play larger parts."

But she also said: "I don't carry myself as a black person but as a woman that belongs to everybody. After all, it's the general public that made (me) — not any one particular group. So I don't think of myself as belonging to any particular group and never have."

Kitt was born in North, S.C., and her road to fame was the stuff of storybooks. In her autobiography, she wrote that her mother was black and Cherokee while her father was white, and she was left to live with relatives after her mother's new husband objected to taking in a mixed-race girl.

An aunt eventually brought her to live in New York, where she attended the High School of Performing Arts, later dropping out to take various odd jobs.

By chance, she dropped by an audition for the dance group run by Dunham, a pioneering African-American dancer. In 1946, Kitt was one of the Sans-Souci Singers in Dunham's Broadway production "Bal Negre."

Kitt's travels with the Dunham troupe landed her a gig in a Paris nightclub in the early 1950s. Kitt was spotted by Welles, who cast her in his Paris stage production of "Faust."

That led to a role in "New Faces of 1952," which featured such other stars-to-be as Carol Lawrence, Paul Lynde and, as a writer, Mel Brooks.

While traveling the world as a dancer and singer in the 1950s, Kitt learned to perform in nearly a dozen languages and, over time, added songs in French, Spanish and even Turkish to her repertoire.

"Usku Dara," a song Kitt said was taught to her by the wife of a Turkish admiral, was one of her first hits, though Kitt says her record company feared it too remote for American audiences to appreciate.

Song titles such as "I Want to be Evil" and "Just an Old Fashioned Girl" seem to reflect the paradoxes in Kitt's private life.

Over the years, Kitt had liaisons with wealthy men, including Revlon founder Charles Revson, who showered her with lavish gifts.

In 1960, she married Bill McDonald but divorced him after the birth of their daughter, Kitt.

While on stage, she was daringly sexy and always flirtatious. Offstage, however, Kitt described herself as shy and almost reclusive, remnants of feeling unwanted and unloved as a child. She referred to herself as "that little urchin cotton-picker from the South, Eartha Mae."

For years, Kitt was unsure of her birthplace or birth date. In 1997, a group of students at historically black Benedict College in Columbia, S.C., located her birth certificate, which verified her birth date as Jan. 17, 1927. Kitt had previously celebrated on Jan. 26.

The research into her background also showed Kitt was the daughter of a white man, a poor cotton farmer.

"I'm an orphan. But the public has adopted me and that has been my only family," she told the Post online. "The biggest family in the world is my fans."

Associated Press Drama Writer Michael Kuchwara contributed to this report.
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Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on December 25, 2008, 10:01:52 PM
meooowwwwwww!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 25, 2008, 11:52:46 PM
Merry X-Mas.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on December 26, 2008, 07:26:31 PM
Merry Xmas, one and all.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 01, 2009, 07:55:34 PM
Quote
Prolific mystery writer Donald Westlake dead at 75

NEW YORK – Prolific mystery writer Donald Westlake has died at the age of 75.

Westlake's wife, Abigail, tells The New York Times the author collapsed as he headed to a New Year's Eve dinner while on vacation in Mexico. His wife says he apparently had a heart attack.

Westlake is considered one of the most successful mystery writers in the United States. He won three Edgar Awards and was nominated for an Academy Award for screenplay writing for "The Grifters."

Westlake wrote more than 100 books. He used his own name and several pseudonyms, including Richard Stark, Tucker Coe, Samuel Holt and Edwin West.

Westlake continued to write. His next novel, "Get Real," is scheduled to be released in April 2009.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 01, 2009, 07:57:16 PM
Oh, man.  Shame.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on January 02, 2009, 10:26:16 AM
So, Dick Clark is actually dead.

They're just animating his corpse once a year for the New Year's Rockin' Eve thing.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 02, 2009, 03:29:52 PM
Wait, is Dick Clark actually dead or is Reggie being funny?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 02, 2009, 03:32:23 PM
He's being funny with a joke that's been made since 1980, when Dick Clark turned 237.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on January 02, 2009, 04:20:29 PM
Yes...sorry.

Anyone who saw him last night would agree though.  He's looking rough.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on January 05, 2009, 11:36:01 AM
Yes...sorry.

Anyone who saw him last night would agree though.  He's looking rough.

Extremely.  It was painful to see his plasticized head fail to form coherent sentences.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on January 06, 2009, 04:51:12 PM
:(

Quote
Ron Asheton, the guitarist for the influential punk rock band The Stooges, was found dead this morning, police tell the Detroit Free Press.

Ron Asheton helped form The Stooges in 1967 with his brother Scott and Iggy Pop.

 The 60-year-old's deceased body was found in his Ann Arbor, Michigan, home after a caller phoned police saying they hadn't heard from him in a few days. Authorities are investigating the cause of death, but foul play is not suspected.

The Stooges were founded in 1967 in Ann Arbor by Iggy Pop, Asheton, and his brother, Scott Asheton. Though never a major commerical success, the band has been cited by artists like Thurston Moore of Sonic Youth and Jack White of the White Stripes as a major influence.

The group's albums included a self-titled debut, which was released in 1969, and 1970's "Fun House." Among the group's songs are "I Wanna Be Your Dog," "1969" and "Raw Power."

The Stooges are nominated for induction in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, with inductees set to be announced later this month. They reunited for a series of shows in 2003, and released a new record, "The Weirdness," in 2007.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 14, 2009, 01:20:21 PM
Oh fuck...


Quote
RIP Patrick McGoohan dies in LA

Breaking news: it's just been reported that respected actor Patrick McGoohan died yesterday aged 80. Famous for playing Number Six in cult favourite The Prisoner, McGoohan passed away on Tuesday in LA following a short illness. BBC story here. We're all saddened here on SFX and our thoughts are with his family.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on January 14, 2009, 02:55:17 PM
HOLY SHIT.  :(
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 14, 2009, 05:28:44 PM
I'm sure we'll see tons of this, but Todd Seavey put up a nice post on McGoohan:

http://toddseavey.com/2009/01/14/patrick-mcgoohan-1909-2009/


Quote
He played boxers, a gay priest, an evil scientist in Scanners, and an evil king in Braveheart, but Patrick McGoohan was best known for playing No. 6 in The Prisoner, a character who may or may not have been the same character he played in the earlier series Danger Man (a.k.a. Secret Agent, whence the great title song “Secret Agent Man”). Though my friend Christine Caldwell Ames once dismissed The Prisoner as “the libertarian Gilligan’s Island,” since it depicts repeated, failed escape attempts by a resigned secret agent trapped in a surreal island prison called the Village, the show was markedly stranger and more intelligent than almost anything else on television, and its concluding episodes — including a trial conducted by masked officials representing “Nationalism” and other collectivist impulses, a machine gun battle set to the Beatles’ “All You Need Is Love,” rocket launches, and semi-improvised absurdist dialogue — are among the strangest hours I’ve ever seen on television, up there with David Lynch’s Twin Peaks.

McGoohan was reportedly influenced by the surrealist G.K. Chesterton novel The Man Who Was Thursday, and his Queens/Ireland/England upbringing seems to have left McGoohan with a sense of both absurdism and moral outrage, something any intelligent libertarian can appreciate (and any rational person trapped in an insane situation). It led to episode plots that should, ideally, cause people to rethink some of their most basic political assumptions, as when No. 6 is told that despite his complaints he is in fact free — because the Village is a democracy, you see, and he’s even allowed to run for office. Who needs escape when you have democracy, after all? One big happy family.

Parodied on The Simpsons at surprising length (for a relatively obscure, old show) with McGoohan doing the voiceover, The Prisoner gave us ambiguous catch phrases such as “Be seeing you” (the standard farewell in the Panopticon-like Village) and “I am not a number, I am a free man!” — which became part of the recurring opening sequence. His most memorable speech may well have been inspired by the same anarchist philosopher who inspired the title of this month’s Debate at Lolita Bar (“Is Intellectual Property Theft?”), by the way. No. 6 says “I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed, or numbered. My life is my own.” In a similar vein, Proudhon wrote (as one of the debate participants reminded me):

To be GOVERNED is to be watched, inspected, spied upon, directed, law-driven, numbered, regulated, enrolled, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, checked, estimated, valued, censured, commanded, by creatures who have neither the right nor the wisdom nor the virtue to do so. To be GOVERNED is to be at every operation, at every transaction noted, registered, counted, taxed, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, licensed, authorized, admonished, prevented, forbidden, reformed, corrected, punished. It is, under pretext of public utility, and in the name of the general interest, to be placed under contribution, drilled, fleeced, exploited, monopolized, extorted from, squeezed, hoaxed, robbed; then, at the slightest resistance, the first word of complaint, to be repressed, fined, vilified, harassed, hunted down, abused, clubbed, disarmed, bound, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, shot, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed; and to crown all, mocked, ridiculed, derided, outraged, dishonored. That is government; that is its justice; that is its morality.

Precisely. Would that Proudhon had seen property as an alternative. No one’s perfect.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 14, 2009, 11:39:29 PM
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Actor Ricardo Montalban Dies at 88
14 January 2009 2:28 PM, PST | From IMDb News
 
Ricardo Montalban, the dashing Mexican actor who gained fame for two iconic television roles -- that of the vengeful Khan in Star Trek and the mysterious Mr. Roark in Fantasy Island -- died on Wednesday at his home in Los Angeles; he was 88. No cause of death was given, though it was known that Montalban had suffered from complications after undergoing 9 1/2 hours of spinal surgery in 1993 to alleviate an injury he suffered in 1951 while filming the western Across the Wide Missouri. The surgery, however, did not resolve his medical problems, and he found himself primarily confined to a wheelchair. A career in Mexican films led to Hollywood and an MGM contract in 1946, and he was cast in a number of Esther Williams films (his American feature debut was in 1946's Fiesta opposite the swimming star) as well as westerns and dramas opposite such stars as Lana Turner and Jane Powell.

After leaving MGM in the mid-fifties, Montalban appeared on numerous television shows, though it was his singular turn as the villainous Khan Noonien Singh, one of a group of genetically engineered "supermen" in the "Space Seed" episode of Star Trek for which he became most remembered, and he reprised that role in the 1982 box office hit Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. By the time that film was released, Montalban had also become famous to a new generation of television viewers as the enigmatic Mr. Rourke, the host of the ABC Saturday night staple Fantasy Island (1978-1984), where he would preside over cautionary tales of those who wished to have their most desired fantasies fulfilled. (Around the same time, Montalban did a number of commercials for the Chrysler Cordoba, where his exhortations of the cars "rich Corinthian leather" would become an affectionate pop culture reference.)

After his role as Khan, Montalban continued to appear in television (most notably on the Dynasty spin-off The Colbys) and in film (as the villain of the comedy The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad!) until his surgery curtailed his acting career. Montalban continued to work, however, appearing in all three of the Spy Kids films and doing voice work for the television shows Kim Possible and Family Guy. Montalban's wife, Georgiana Young (the younger sister of actress Loretta Young) died in 2007; the two had been married since 1944 and had four children.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 15, 2009, 06:45:05 AM
God.  Bad week.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on January 15, 2009, 01:07:47 PM
holy shit again!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on January 16, 2009, 01:31:57 AM
quien es mas macho?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 16, 2009, 09:58:30 AM
It is a bad month for sci-fi...

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A very sad month for sci-fi movie and TV fans kicked off with the less-bulletined, but still sad loss of John Scott Martin -- the veteran British actor best known for operating a Dalek through four decades and countless episodes of Doctor Who.

Enjoying a career in theater, TV and film that spanned more than a half-century, Martin appeared in Monty Python films, Little Shop of Horrors and Pink Floyd The Wall.

Compact in stature and experienced in stagecraft, Martin was a natural choice to squeeze inside the Dalek's mechanical costume, operating the monster in the first Doctor Who episodes that created Dalekmania in the United Kingtom, circa 1964. He would star in 110 episodes of the show, either encased in Dalekanium or making an occasional on-screen appearance in the flesh.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 16, 2009, 10:54:30 AM
Wow.. Maybe the rapture has started.

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John Mortimer, the British barrister who created Rumpole of the Bailey, has died, the BBC
 
reported. Mortimer, who was 85, also wrote a range of screenplays and radio and TV adaptations. Rumpole of the Bailey--the main character's wife was "she who must be obeyed"--was made into a very popular TV series.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on January 16, 2009, 12:53:52 PM
Loved Rumpole... it was a fantastic show.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 19, 2009, 10:26:46 AM
The sci-fi purge continues...


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Voice of the Robot In Lost In Space Dies

Bob May, the actor who played the Robot in the 1969s series Lost In Space has died of congestive heart failure in LA at the age of 69.

"He always said he got the job because he fit in the robot suit," said June Lockhart, who played family matriarch Maureen Robinson. "It was one of those wonderful Hollywood stories. He just happened to be on the studio lot when someone saw him and sent him to see Irwin Allen about the part. Allen said, 'If you can fit in the suit you've got the job.'

"He was a smoker," she added. "From time to time (when he was on a break) we'd see smoke coming out of the robot. That always amused us."

May didn’t voice the robot – that was provided by Dick Tufeld – but he was always fond of his involvement in the show, calling the suit his "home away from home". And he would learn all the Robot’s lines so that he knew how he should be interacting with the other characters.

The grandson of famed vaudeville comedian Chic Johnson, May was introduced to show business at age two when he began appearing in the Hellzapoppin comedy revue with Johnson and his partner, Ole Olsen. He went on to appear in numerous films with Jerry Lewis and in such TV shows as The Time Tunnel, McHale's Navy and The Red Skelton Show.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 27, 2009, 01:10:54 AM
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Kim Manners, a prolific director and producer whose long showbiz career stretches from 1971’s “Valdez is Coming” to “Charlie’s Angels,” “Automan,” “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” “The Adventures of Brisco County Jr.,” “MANTIS,” and “Harsh Realm,” passed away Sunday night following a battle with cancer.

His last directorial effort was “Family Remains,” the Jan. 15 episode of “Supernatural.”

Masters directed 53 hours of “The X-Files,” including the 2002 two-hour series finale, “The Truth.”

Hailing from a showbiz family, Manners got his start as a second assistant director on the big-screen Burt Lancaster western “Valdez is Coming,” produced by his father Sam.

Joining “Charlie’s Angels” in 1977 as an assistant director and production manager, he eventually directed 11 episodes of that series, starting with 1979’s “Angels Remembered.”

His episode of “Star Trek: The Next Generation” was season one’s “When The Bough Breaks,” about impotent extraterrestrials who kidnap the Enterprise’s children.

“Supernatural” mastermind Eric Kripke issued this statement:

Everyone at 'Supernatural' is walking around in a daze, shocked and absolutely devastated. Kim was a brilliant director; more than that, he was a mentor and friend. He was one of the patriarchs of the family, and we miss him desperately. He gave so much to 'Supernatural,' and everything we do on the show, now and forever, is in memory of him.

Among those surviving Manners is sister and longtime assistant director Tana Manners (“Deadly Whispers”). Another sister, Kelly Manners, was a producer on “Buffy The Vampire Slayer” and “Angel” and currently serves as a producer on the upcoming Fox series “Dollhouse.”
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on January 27, 2009, 02:41:09 PM
John Updike died today too
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 27, 2009, 04:19:09 PM
John Updike died today too

Here's Updike's AP Obit . . .

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John Updike, prize-winning writer, dead at age 76

NEW YORK – John Updike, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, prolific man of letters and erudite chronicler of sex, divorce and other adventures in the postwar prime of the American empire, died Tuesday at age 76.

Updike, best known for his four "Rabbit" novels, died of lung cancer at a hospice near his home in Beverly Farms, Mass., according to his longtime publisher, Alfred A. Knopf.

A literary writer who frequently appeared on best-seller lists, the tall, hawk-nosed Updike wrote novels, short stories, poems, criticism, the memoir "Self-Consciousness" and even a famous essay about baseball great Ted Williams.

He released more than 50 books in a career that started in the 1950s, winning virtually every literary prize, including two Pulitzers, for "Rabbit Is Rich" and "Rabbit at Rest," and two National Book Awards.

Although himself deprived of a Nobel, he did bestow it upon one of his fictional characters, Henry Bech, the womanizing, egotistical Jewish novelist who collected the literature prize in 1999.

His settings ranged from the court of "Hamlet" to postcolonial Africa, but his literary home was the American suburb, the great new territory of mid-century fiction.

Born in 1932, Updike spoke for millions of Depression-era readers raised by "penny-pinching parents," united by "the patriotic cohesion of World War II" and blessed by a "disproportionate share of the world's resources," the postwar, suburban boom of "idealistic careers and early marriages."

He captured, and sometimes embodied, a generation's confusion over the civil rights and women's movements, and opposition to the Vietnam War. Updike was called a misogynist, a racist and an apologist for the establishment. On purely literary grounds, he was attacked by Norman Mailer as the kind of author appreciated by readers who knew nothing about writing. Last year, judges of Britain's Bad Sex in Fiction Prize voted Updike lifetime achievement honors.

But more often he was praised for his flowing, poetic writing style. Describing a man's interrupted quest to make love, Updike likened it "to a small angel to which all afternoon tiny lead weights are attached."

Nothing was too great or too small for Updike to poeticize. He might rhapsodize over the film projector's "chuckling whir" or look to the stars and observe that "the universe is perfectly transparent: we exist as flaws in ancient glass."

In the richest detail, his books recorded the extremes of earthly desire and spiritual zealotry, whether the comic philandering of the preacher in "A Month of Sundays" or the steady rage of the young Muslim in "Terrorist." Raised in the Protestant community of Shillington, Pa., where the Lord's Prayer was recited daily at school, Updike was a lifelong churchgoer influenced by his faith, but not immune to doubts.

"I remember the times when I was wrestling with these issues that I would feel crushed. I was crushed by the purely materialistic, atheistic account of the universe," Updike told The Associated Press during a 2006 interview.

"I am very prone to accept all that the scientists tell us, the truth of it, the authority of the efforts of all the men and woman spent trying to understand more about atoms and molecules. But I can't quite make the leap of unfaith, as it were, and say, `This is it. Carpe diem (seize the day), and tough luck.'"

He received his greatest acclaim for the "Rabbit" series, a quartet of novels published over a 30-year span that featured ex-high school basketball star Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom and his restless adjustment to adulthood and the constraints of work and family. To the very end, Harry was in motion, an innocent in his belief that any door could be opened, a believer in God even as he bedded women other than his wife.

The series "to me is the tale of a life, a life led by an American citizen who shares the national passion for youth, freedom, and sex, the national openness and willingness to learn, the national habit of improvisation," Updike would later write. "He is furthermore a Protestant, haunted by a God whose manifestations are elusive, yet all-important."

Other notable books included "Couples," a sexually explicit tale of suburban mating that sold millions of copies; "In the Beauty of the Lilies," an epic of American faith and fantasy; and "Too Far to Go," which followed the courtship, marriage and divorce of the Maples, a suburban couple with parallels to Updike's own first marriage.

Updike's "The Witches of Eastwick," released in 1984, was later made into a film of the same name starring Jack Nicholson, Cher, Michelle Pfeiffer and Susan Sarandon.

Plagued from an early age by asthma, psoriasis and a stammer, he found creative outlets in drawing and writing. Updike was born in Reading, Pa., his mother a department store worker who longed to write, his father a high school teacher remembered with sadness and affection in "The Centaur," a novel published in 1964. The author brooded over his father's low pay and mocking students, but also wrote of a childhood of "warm and action-packed houses that accommodated the presence of a stranger, my strange ambition to be glamorous."

For Updike, the high life meant books, such as the volumes of P.G. Wodehouse and Robert Benchley he borrowed from the library as a child, or, as he later recalled, the "chastely severe, time-honored classics" he read in his dorm room at Harvard University, leaning back in his "wooden Harvard chair," cigarette in hand.

While studying on full scholarship at Harvard, he headed the staff of the Harvard Lampoon and met the woman who became his first wife, Mary Entwistle Pennington, whom he married in June 1953, a year before he earned his A.B. degree summa cum laude. (Updike divorced Pennington in 1975 and was remarried two years later, to Martha Bernhard).

After graduating, he accepted a one-year fellowship to study painting at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Arts at Oxford University. During his stay in England, a literary idol, E.B. White, offered him a position at The New Yorker, where he served briefly as foreign books reviewer. Many of Updike's reviews and short stories were published in The New Yorker, often edited by White's stepson, Roger Angell.

By the end of the 1950s, Updike had published a story collection, a book of poetry and his first novel, "The Poorhouse Fair," soon followed by the first of the Rabbit books, "Rabbit, Run." Praise came so early and so often that New York Times critic Arthur Mizener worried that Updike's "natural talent" was exposing him "from an early age to a great deal of head-turning praise."

Updike learned to write about everyday life by, in part, living it. In 1957, he left New York, with its "cultural hassle" and melting pot of "agents and wisenheimers," and settled with his first wife and four kids in Ipswich, Mass, a "rather out-of-the-way town" about 30 miles north of Boston.

"The real America seemed to me 'out there,' too heterogeneous and electrified by now to pose much threat of the provinciality that people used to come to New York to escape," Updike later wrote.

"There were also practical attractions: free parking for my car, public education for my children, a beach to tan my skin on, a church to attend without seeming too strange."

In recent years, his books included "The Widows of Eastwick," a sequel to "The Witches of Eastwick"; and two essay collections, "Still Looking" and "Due Considerations." A book of short fiction, "My Father's Tears and Other Stories," is scheduled to come out later this year.

Updike is survived by his second wife, Marsha, and by four children.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 28, 2009, 03:34:03 PM
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Author and Parade columnist James Brady dies at 80

NEW YORK – James Brady, the Parade magazine celebrity columnist whose wide-ranging career also included novels, a memoir on his Korean War service and a stint as publisher of the fashion bible Women's Wear Daily, has died at 80.

Brady's death was announced Tuesday by Parade magazine, where he wrote the celebrity profile column "In Step With" for nearly 25 years. He died Monday at his Manhattan home.

Brady also was credited with initiating the New York Post's popular Page Six gossip section when he worked for publisher Rupert Murdoch in the 1970s. During that time, he also succeeded Clay Felker as editor of New York magazine when Murdoch acquired it in 1977

His varied interests were alluded to in a 1997 New York Times profile. At Brady's home in East Hampton, it said, "photos from years gone by paper the walls. Mr. Brady with (designer Coco) Chanel in Paris, Mr. Brady with a young Brooke Shields in New York, Mr. Brady in combat fatigues in Korea, Mr. Brady with President Bush in Washington."

The Times praised his 1990 memoir on Korea, "The Coldest War," as "a superb personal memoir of the way it was. ... What distinguishes Mr. Brady's book is its clarity and modesty; there is no heroic flag-waving here."

He followed it up with a 2000 novel, "The Marines of Autumn," and his 2005 "The Scariest Place in the World: A Marine Returns to North Korea."

He had gone back in 2003 for Parade magazine, and in the book he shared his experiences and emotions on seeing the place 50 years after the war ended in a stalemate. In "The Scariest Place," he wrote that none of the many later events of his life "matched the intensity, the gravitas and sheer excitement" of combat as leader of a rifle platoon.

Among his other books was "Further Lane," a 1997 murder mystery set in East Hampton; and two novels drawing on his years in the women's wear field: "Designs" and "Fashion Show."

He had become Women's Wear Daily's publisher in 1964. Working with Fairchild Publications chief John Fairchild, he helped make the daily into a publication popular with 1960s fashionistas as well as professionals in the clothing trade.

He jumped to Hearst Corp. in 1971 and was publisher of its fashion magazine Harper's Bazaar.

But many readers knew him best for his contributions at Parade. CEO Walter Anderson said Brady "was a friend to the 73 million Americans who looked forward to his column each week ... He will be extraordinarily missed."

His last column will appear Feb. 15. It will feature actor Kevin Bacon.

Born in 1928, Brady started as a copyboy for the New York Daily News, where he worked while attending Manhattan College. Shortly after returning from Korea, he joined Fairchild Publications. Among other posts, he covered Washington for Fairchild and later reported from London and Paris.

He was hired by Murdoch in 1974 to edit the then-new weekly Star magazine. He later was an associate publisher at the New York Post.

Brady is survived by his wife, two daughters, a brother and other relatives.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 28, 2009, 03:43:58 PM
If all these people weren't in their 80's, I'd start to get worried.

But, really, it's just an era coming to an end, isn't it?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 28, 2009, 03:48:24 PM
But, really, it's just an era coming to an end, isn't it?

Yeah, which is strange in and of itself.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on January 28, 2009, 04:32:09 PM
If all these people weren't in their 80's, I'd start to get worried.

But, really, it's just an era coming to an end, isn't it?

You mean the era of well known print journalists?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 28, 2009, 04:38:22 PM
I'm counting the last two weeks reported in this thread.  McGoohan, Montalban, etc.  Then there's Updike and the Rumpole author.  Those behind the scenes sci-fi guys... People who were influential in so many pop culture ways in the middle of the 20th are all now hitting their 80's and dying off.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 28, 2009, 05:22:44 PM
These obits of late get me thinking of guys like Dickens, Valentino, and Einstein. It's another changing of the guard.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 28, 2009, 05:25:22 PM
You might have to help me out on the connection between those three, RC. 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 28, 2009, 05:30:00 PM
Guys whose heyday was in the 1890s - 1930s . . . who have become all but footnotes in pop culture but were giants in their time. (Okay, Einstein might not be in that group, but that's the connection.)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 28, 2009, 05:31:04 PM
Dickens died in 1870.

And he's hardly a footnote!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 28, 2009, 05:32:46 PM
I'm think I'm saying/typing Dickens, but I'm thinking Conan Doyle/the Sherlock Holmes guy.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 28, 2009, 05:35:45 PM
ACD isn't a footnote, either!  Barbarian.

By the way, speaking of Dickens:
Drood: A Novel (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0316007021?ie=UTF8&tag=santafewriterspr&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0316007021)<img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=santafewriterspr&l=as2&o=1&a=0316007021" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" />
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 28, 2009, 05:40:55 PM
Not to shut-ins like you who read everything under the sun written after after 1604!

I'm not illustrating what I'm feeling though. Think of James Whale, Jack Arnold, Lovecraft, even Sam Arkoff. They were genre  beacons of their time. Same goes for Carey Grant, Rock Hudson, and Greta Garbo. But now they're regarded as quaint remembrances. Historically significant? Definitely. However, they all died long after the reins had been passed to those who emulated and built upon their legacies.

I don't know if all that makes sense. It just makes me feel old, I guess.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 28, 2009, 05:50:32 PM
Not to shut-ins like you who read everything under the sun written after after 1604!

Ah, Daniel Defoe!  Where are you when we need you!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on January 28, 2009, 10:02:59 PM
no, what's really happening is just another extension of our oversaturated culture.  we know about way more celebrities or even pseudo-celebrities than in times past, so it makes sense that we'd always hear about their deaths.  AND more and more celebrities and pseudo-celebrities are getting fucking old.  in the 60s nobody bothered to print a national obituary about the guy who voiced some popular cartoon, but i guarantee you if the guy who did spongebob squarepants' voice died tomorrow they'd have to shut down schools. 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on January 29, 2009, 04:51:35 PM
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More sad news on a day of sad news: Charlie Cooper, one half of electro-ambient group Telefon Tel Aviv passed away last week. Here is an excerpt from the post announcing this by Joshua Eustis, the other half of the group:

We have been friends since high school, and began making records together a decade ago. We have been so fortunate to tour the world together, while at the same time having a massive amount of laughs at one another's expense. 

Aside from Charlie's singular genius and musical gifts, I can tell you that he was a total sweetheart of a guy, and a loving friend and confidant to people everywhere. His musicianship was surpassed only by his greater gift to the world - his warmth, his generosity, his unquenchable humor, and his undying loyalty to those whom he loved. In the spirit of honorable mention, however, I should mention that he had a shoe collection that was marvelous, knowledge of hip-hop that was profound, and knowledge of wine that was subtle. 

He is survived by a sister, a neice, a nephew, his mother, his stepfather, me, and more adoring friends than the Universe has dark matter. As such, his family and I ask for your discretion and consideration of our privacy during these extremely turbulent waters.

 Yours in Music,Joshua Eustis
 

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 05, 2009, 12:39:03 PM
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Lux Interior, frontman of punkabilly gods The Cramps, died today of complications from a heart condition in Glendale, CA. This performance of "Tear it Up" from Urgh! A Music War captures Lux, Poison Ivy and Co. at their best. R.I.P.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 07, 2009, 10:00:30 PM
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Craggy-faced film, television and stage actor James Whitmore has died at 87, the Los Angeles County, California, Sheriff's Department confirmed Saturday.

Details of his death and funeral arrangements were not available.

Whitmore notably portrayed Harry Truman, Will Rogers and Theodore Roosevelt in one-man stage shows and created memorable characters in many movies and TV shows, including "The Twilight Zone."

According to entertainment Web site IMDb.com, Whitmore won a Tony award in 1948 for his gritty Broadway portrayal of an Army sergeant in "Command Decision" but was replaced by Van Johnson in the film version.

Whitmore won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Oscar for his performance in the 1949 film "Battleground." He was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar in 1976 for "Give 'Em Hell, Harry," the film version of his one-man show about Truman.

The actor won an Emmy in 2000 for his performance as Raymond Oz in a three-episode arc on the ABC legal drama "The Practice," according to IMDb.com.

Movie fans may remember his subtle portrayal of aging prison inmate Brooks Hatlen in 1994's "The Shawshank Redemption" with Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman.

He played U.S. Navy Adm. William F. Halsey in the World War II epic "Tora! Tora! Tora!" and was an imperious ape in the 1968 classic "Planet of the Apes."

Whitmore looked natural in cowboy boots and hat, appearing in such TV series as "Bonanza," "The Virginian" and "Gunsmoke."

He also did commercials for Miracle-Gro plant foods.

According to IMDb.com, Whitmore was born in 1921 in White Plains, New York. He was married four times: twice to Nancy Mygatt, for four years in the '70s to actress Audra Lindley, and since 2001 to actress Noreen Nash.

He was the father of three children, including actor-director James Whitmore Jr.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on February 09, 2009, 12:56:25 PM
I hope my obituary doesn't begin with the words "craggy-faced."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on February 11, 2009, 12:04:23 PM
Quote
Nicknamed 'Pitbull' because of his tenacity on a motorcycle, Lusk is believed to be the first pro rider to have died from injuries sustained in an FMX contest.

By Pete Thomas

February 11, 2009

Jeremy Lusk, star of a daredevil sport known as freestyle motocross and a popular action sports hero, died early Tuesday from head injuries suffered during a crash Saturday at a competition in San Jose, Costa Rica. He was 24.

Lusk, a Temecula resident, had been in a medically induced coma, with swelling of the brain, at Calderon Guardia Hospital in San Jose. A spokesman at the hospital said he suffered severe brain damage and a possible spinal cord injury.

Nicknamed "Pitbull" because of his tenacity on a motorcycle, Lusk was injured after failing to fully rotate a back-flip variation while soaring over a 100-foot jump.

He slammed headfirst into the dirt on the landing ramp's down-slope. It was reminiscent of a similar crash he endured while attempting the same trick during the 2007 X Games at the Home Depot Center in Carson, but Lusk walked away from that incident.

The trick involves extending the body away from the motorcycle and grabbing the seat as the motorcycle is upside down, then pulling back aboard as the motorcycle is righted before landing. Lusk clearly had trouble getting back on the seat, and some witnesses said swirling winds within San Jose's Ricardo Saprissa Stadium may have been a factor.


Despite the danger associated with freestyle motocross, Lusk is believed to be the first pro rider to have died from injuries suffered in an FMX contest, though several have incurred serious injuries.

Lusk, who was born in San Diego in 1984 and had been riding motorcycles since he was 3, turned pro at 19. He was coming off his most successful year.

He won his first X Games gold medal in the freestyle motocross competition last summer at the Home Depot Center, and won a silver medal in the FMX best-trick contest.

Also in 2008, Lusk won two gold medals in an X Games Mexico competition; he finished third in the Dew Tour series standings, and he was never lower than fourth in a string of high-level international events.

The X-Knights competition Saturday in Costa Rica was not affiliated with the X Games.

Of Lusk, X Games General Manager Chris Stiepock said: "He was really starting to emerge as one of the premier freestyle motocross riders in the world.

"He was a great kid and a great athlete. I think he represented his sport very well. He was very passionate about what he did, and I think it's a great loss for the freestyle motocross community for sure."

Stiepock said he did not believe the increasingly risky maneuvers attempted by freestyle motocross riders have pushed the sport over the line. "I think there's a whole lot more that can be done with freestyle motocross, and we're going to continue to feature it strongly at the X Games," he said.

Lusk was on a team of star FMX riders called Metal Mulisha, founded by the sport's most iconic figure, Brian Deegan.

Deegan was in Costa Rica and unavailable for comment but released a statement through his publicist: "Jeremy motivated me to be a better person; he was my best friend. The bond of this team is one that will never be broken."

Lusk is survived by his wife, Lauren, and his parents, who were with him when he died.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 25, 2009, 04:56:09 PM
My mom's favorite author.  He was 91.

Quote
February 25th:

Philip José Farmer passed away peacefully in his sleep this morning.

He will be missed greatly by his wife Bette, his children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, friends and countless fans around the world.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: fajwat on February 25, 2009, 06:44:45 PM
oh, crap.

Yeah, he was great.  I read him in jr high, maybe even earlier, and re-read him fairly often.

Dayworld Rebel was my favorite series, and I still use concepts & memories from that book.  Riverworld was a distant 2nd for me, but people don't often agree with that preference.

I'm still finding short story collections & oddities in used book stores, and some are really special (and dark).
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on February 27, 2009, 04:38:01 PM
I heard a rumor Ed McMahon's going to die this weekend....
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 16, 2009, 09:30:50 AM
Quote
RIP Ron Silver (1946-2009)
From Fangoria.com
 
Sad news tonight for Fangoria and Starlog readers, as Variety reports that actor Ron Silver has died. The recognizable actor first touched on the horror genre with the 1981 film The Entity, and continued appearing in genre fare steadily for the rest of his career, amassing a list that includes The Wisher, Timecop, The Arrival, Blue Steel, Shadow Zone: The Undead Express, and more.

Silver recently spent much time working in television, with recurring runs on The West Wing, Veronica's Closet, and Chicago Hope.

"Ron Silver died peacefully in his sleep with his family around him early Sunday morning" in New York City, said Robin Bronk, executive director of the Creative Coalition, which Silver helped found. "He had been fighting esophageal cancer for two years."

Ron Silver was 62 years old.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on March 18, 2009, 11:53:20 AM
So reports are starting to come in that Natasha Richardson is brain dead now.  She had a skiing accident on a bunny slope earlier this week and then complained later that she felt sick and was taken to the hospital.

No idea if this is true or not, but... man... that is really sad if it is.

Edit: From the NY Post


Quote
NATASHA RICHARDSON IS BRAIN DEAD
CRITICALLY INJURED IN SKIING ACCIDENT


Actress Natasha Richardson is brain dead - after falling in a ski accident in Canada - and is now on sad journey home to New York, friends told The Post today.

Richardson, who was being treated at a Montreal hospital, is being transported to New York this afternoon so her mom Vanessa Redgrave, two children and other loved ones can say goodbye before she's taken off life-support, friends said.

Redgrave was in London when the accident happened but arrived in New York today to see her gravely injured daughter, sources said.

Liam Neeson, husband of the Broadway and screen star, left shooting of his movie in Toronto to rush to Richardson's side in Montreal and now on the trip home.

The British-born Richardson, 45, fell during a private lesson at Mont Tremblant resort yesterday and allegedly told resort employees she felt fine.

But an hour later, she complained of an extreme headache and was rushed to a nearby hospital.

Richardson was on a beginner's slope and reportedly not wearing a helmet when she fell - although headgear is not required.

"She did not show any visible sign of injury but the ski patrol followed strict procedures and brought her back to the bottom of the slope and insisted she should see a doctor," said a statement from the resort, which is almost 80 miles northwest of Montreal.

"Approximately an hour after the incident Mrs. Richardson was not feeling good."

Richardson was initially taken to the Centre Hospitalier Laurentien in Sainte Agathe and was later transferred to Hopital du Sacre-Coeur in Montreal.

The actress - who is the elder daughter of Oscar-winner Vanessa Redgrave and late director Tony Richardson - comes from a long line of noted British players.

Maternal grandparents Michael Redgrave and Rachel Kempson, uncle and aunt Corin Redgrave and Lynn Redgrave are all actors.

Sister Joely Richardson currently has a recurring role in the FX show "Nip/Tuck."

Natasha Richardson was mostly recently on TV as a guest judge on the Bravo hit "Top Chef."

She also appeared in the 1994 movie "Nell" alongside future husband Neeson. They were married a short time later and they have two sons.

The elder son, Michael, 13, was with Richardson on the slopes, while the younger Daniel, 12, was here in New York when the accident happened, friends said.

Richardson reached her Broadway peak in 1998, winning the Tony for playing Sally Bowles in "Cabaret."

Richardson is close friends with her ex-husband Robert Fox and he's expected to be with her today.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 18, 2009, 11:56:31 AM
Yeah, last I head she was critical.  Also, David Prowse is losing against cancer today.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on March 18, 2009, 11:59:09 AM
When it rains it pours I guess.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 19, 2009, 10:28:38 AM
And...she's gone.  Sad.


Quote
Natasha Richardson dies after ski fall

NEW YORK (CNN) -- Natasha Richardson, a film star, Tony-winning stage actress and member of the famed Redgrave acting family, died Wednesday after suffering injuries in a ski accident, according to a family statement. She was 45.

Richardson, wife of actor Liam Neeson, was injured Monday in a fall on a ski slope at a Quebec resort about 80 miles northwest of Montreal.

Richardson's family released a statement saying, "Liam Neeson, his sons, and the entire family are shocked and devastated by the tragic death of their beloved Natasha. They are profoundly grateful for the support, love and prayers of everyone, and ask for privacy during this very difficult time."

According to a statement from Mont Tremblant Ski Resort, Richardson fell during a lesson on a beginners' trail. VideoWatch a report on Richardson's life »

"She did not show any visible sign of injury, but the ski patrol followed strict procedures and brought her back to the bottom of the slope and insisted she should see a doctor," the statement said.

Richardson, accompanied by her instructor, returned to her hotel, but about an hour after the fall was "not feeling good," the statement said. An ambulance was called, and Richardson was taken to a local hospital before being transferred to Hopital du Sacre-Coeur in Montreal. From there she was transferred to Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Richardson was practically born to perform. Her grandfather, Sir Michael Redgrave, was a famed British actor. Her mother, Vanessa Redgrave, is an Oscar-winning actress, and her father, the late director Tony Richardson, helmed such films as "Look Back in Anger," "The Entertainer" and the Oscar-winning "Tom Jones."

Natasha Richardson's uncle Corin Redgrave, aunt Lynn Redgrave, and sister Joely Richardson are also noted performers.

But being part of a family of actors wasn't always easy for Richardson. Her parents divorced when she was 4 and her mother, involved in controversial political causes, gave away a lot of money, putting the family in financial straits, according to the BBC.

Then there was the family heritage, of which Richardson once said, "Though my name opened doors it didn't get me work, and a lot of pressure comes from having a mother who is considered one of the greatest actresses of her generation," the BBC reported.

In 2007, Richardson worked with her mother in the film "Evening." Richardson said she made one point to director Lajos Koltai about the relatives working together. "This is a unique opportunity," she said she told him. "This is the one time my mother and I are going to play mother and daughter on screen, so you've got to take advantage of it." VideoWatch Richardson talk about working with her mom »

Richardson's first film role was a bit part in her father's "The Charge of the Light Brigade" (1968), made when she was 4. After a handful of roles through her teens and early 20s, she broke through as Mary Shelley in Ken Russell's film "Gothic," and followed that up as Patty Hearst in Paul Schrader's 1988 film of the same name.

Richardson's other notable films included "The Handmaid's Tale" (1990); the TV movie "Zelda" (1993); "Nell" (1994), alongside Neeson, whom she married in 1994; the 1998 remake of "The Parent Trap"; and "Wild Child" (2008). VideoWatch Larry King and his panel talk about Richardson's career and death »

But some of Richardson's greatest successes were on the stage. At 22, she played opposite her mother and Jonathan Pryce in a London production of Anton Chekhov's "The Seagull"; the performance earned her the London Drama Critics' most promising newcomer award.

She won a Tony for her performance as Sally Bowles in the 1998 revival of "Cabaret" and earned raves for her Blanche DuBois in a 2005 production of "A Streetcar Named Desire." She was scheduled to perform in a revival of Stephen Sondheim's "A Little Night Music" this year, following a January benefit performance of the show.

She and Neeson have two children, Michael and Daniel. Richardson was married to Robert Fox from 1990 to 1994.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 19, 2009, 11:00:00 AM
Very sad.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on March 19, 2009, 09:46:27 PM
so....i know this is in bad taste, but has someone made a video yet of liam neeson from Taken talking on the phone to a ski slope?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 20, 2009, 12:56:17 AM
Or anything from Fallout about the dead mother?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on March 20, 2009, 12:18:06 PM
What I wonder is how much hospital ER traffic has increased since this happened because Americans, for the most part, are complete idiots.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Sirharles on March 31, 2009, 10:06:53 AM
I always liked his character

Quote
Actor and singer Andy Hallett has passed away, aged 33.

Hallet, best known for his recurring role as Lorne in hit U.S. TV show Angel, died from heart failure following a five-year battle against heart disease.

He landed his first break after he was dragged on stage at a concert to sing with Patti Labelle - the performance kickstarted his career as a singer-songwriter.

Hallett was spotted during a revue at a Los Angeles nightclub by Buffy The Vampire Slayer creator Joss Whedon, who created the demon character Lorne in the show's spin-off Angel just for him.

The star appeared in 76 episodes before series ended in 2004. Hallet's subsequent ill health ended his acting career.

He died on Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles, with his father Dave Hallett by his side.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 31, 2009, 10:17:22 AM
Jesus!  What did he have?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on April 01, 2009, 10:40:21 AM
I feel like it was heart disease for some reason.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 01, 2009, 10:50:34 AM
Do you have that feeling because it's in the first line of the obit which it took me two days to actually read and comprehend?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on April 01, 2009, 10:57:52 AM
I can neither confirm or deny that statement.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 01, 2009, 11:02:00 AM
I demand a jury of my peers!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 09, 2009, 12:57:47 PM
Even class 0 armor couldn't save him.

Quote
Dungeons & Dragons Co-Creator Dead At 61

Dave Arneson, the man who first created the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game alongside Gary Gygax, passed Tuesday night, his family announced via email.

It may not directly relate to the world of electronic videogames, but it's impossible to ignore the influence Arneson's work has had on the gaming developers we all hold so dear.

Not only did D&D force gamers to think creatively and reason their way to safety, it's also the single greatest source of high fantasy creatures and ideas since Lord of the Rings author J.R.R. Tolkien. I attempted to come up with any fantasy title that doesn't somehow lift from D&D, and after 20 minutes of contemplation, I'm still drawing a blank.

Sadly, this news follows the passing of Gary Gygax in 2008.

We offer our greatest condolences to Arneson's family and loved ones, and would like to thank the man for making the world a much more interesting place during his time here.

Correction: Gary Gygax passed away in March of 2008, not 2009. We apologize for any confusion.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on April 09, 2009, 02:12:37 PM
(http://i44.tinypic.com/2ptutci.jpg)

Quote
LOS ANGELES, California (CNN) -- Los Angeles Angels pitcher Nick Adenhart was among three people killed in a crash in Fullerton, California, early Thursday, according to a hospital spokesman.

Adenhart, 22, from Silver Spring, Maryland, died at UC Irvine Medical Center, according to spokesman John Murray.

The crash occurred just hours after Adenhart made his first start of the season for the Angels, pitching six scoreless innings in a 6-4 loss to the Athletics.


So freakin sad... unreal.  I posted it because he was from Silver Spring.  That picture is from last night's game.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 09, 2009, 05:12:37 PM
I'll watch for the "RIP NICK" graffiti!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 10, 2009, 05:17:41 PM
Watching the latest Breaking Bad and was shocked to see that Kim Manners had died...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kim_Manners
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 13, 2009, 05:25:22 PM
This is the first time one of the fantasy girls of my youth has died and I'm having a little bit of a hard time processing it. (I discovered Bettie Page when I was older.)

Quote
Marilyn Chambers, Legendary Adult Actress, Dead at 57

SANTA CLARITA, Calif. - Marilyn Chambers, star of such golden age classics as Behind the Green Door and Insatiable, was found dead Sunday in the mobile home where she had been living for the past several months. She was 57. Chambers was found by her daughter, McKenna. No cause of death is yet known, and an autopsy will be performed.

Chambers, who said she began performing under her real name because she was unashamed of what she did, was nonetheless born Marilyn Ann Briggs, and she made 16 movies during the period 1972 to 1986, mostly for the Mitchell Brothers and Caballero Home Video. It was at Caballero that she created the series Marilyn Chambers' Private Fantasies. During this period, she was married to her manager, Chuck Traynor, and though they were divorced in 1985, when Chambers made her comeback film for VCA Pictures, Still Insatiable, in 1998, she requested that Traynor be present for the filming to lend her moral support. The comeback, however, was short-lived, generating just nine movies, some of which were non-sex roles. Chambers tried her hand at producing as well, creating what was hoped to be a continuing series, Nantucket Housewives, for her own company, Damaged Productions.

Johnnie Keyes, one of her co-stars in Behind the Green Door, remarked, "We were really close. I’m still in shock. It’s like it’s not even really hitting me yet. I don’t know what my feelings are. It’s like my brain is protecting me right but the gloom is starting to set in." 

Chambers was also famous for having appeared as the "cover girl" on boxes of Ivory Snow detergent, and was the star of David Cronenberg's horror film Rabid in 1977.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 13, 2009, 05:32:56 PM
I thought she was long dead... But I'm thinking of the whiny Deep Throat girl, aren't I?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 13, 2009, 05:52:40 PM
Linda Lovelace, yeah.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 20, 2009, 10:32:39 AM
We lost Ballard...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2009/apr/19/jg-ballard-obituary

Quote
JG Ballard, who has died aged 78, once described himself as "a man of complete and serene ordinariness" (to the disbelief of his interviewer). In fact, he was one of the most strikingly original English writers of the past half-century. Esteemed for his wayward imagination and his ability to create a distinctively Ballardian world, his fiction moved through various phases while remaining instantly recognisable.

Although best known for his 1984 bestseller Empire of the Sun, his first fame, in the early 1960s, was as a science fiction writer, hailed by slightly older peers such as Kingsley Amis and Brian Aldiss. But within a decade or so his reputation had modulated into that of an avant garde provocateur, admired by visual artists and punk rockers. Another decade on and he reemerged as a great novelist of the second world war experience with Empire of the Sun, shortlisted for the Booker prize and winning his widest-ever public. Yet another decade on and he seemed to redefine himself as a special kind of crime writer – one with a peculiar, sinister vision of late 20th-century modernity that appealed particularly to the younger end of Britain's literary and arts scene.

And yet the "serene ordinariness" that he claimed for himself was manifest in his personal life and modest circumstances: he lived in the same small, semi-detached house in Shepperton, Surrey, for nearly half a century; he rarely travelled in his later decades, and he very seldom participated in literary festivals or jamborees.

Jimmy Ballard was the eldest child of James and Edna Ballard, who had emigrated in 1929 from Manchester to Shanghai, where he was born. His father rose to be managing director of a British-owned textile factory there, and the young Ballard grew up in the upper middle-class, quasi-colonial style of a large house in Amherst Avenue, tended by Chinese servants and Russian governesses. A younger sister, Margaret, was born in 1937, the same year that Japan invaded China. The family, like most European expatriates, were able to carry on a normal, prosperous existence, despite shells occasionally whizzing over their house in the International Settlement.

This endured until December 1941 when, immediately after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Japanese forces entered the settlement. After a year of uncertainty, in early 1943 all "enemy civilians" were interned in camps which surrounded the city. The Ballards were confined to Lunghua civilian assembly centre where they remained until August 1945.

The young Ballard grew from a naive 12-year-old to a perhaps prematurely wise 14-year-old during his time in the camp. He was never separated from his parents and sister, and the physical privations were not especially severe. Nevertheless, the contrast with their previous lifestyle was extreme, awakening in the boy a lifelong sensitivity to dislocations, sudden reversals, paradoxes, and ironies. A few months after the Japanese surrender, he was repatriated to England, a country he had never seen, together with his mother and sister (his father did not finally return to the west until after the Communist takeover of China in 1949).

From early in 1946 he was a boarder at The Leys school, Cambridge, where, when he entered the sixth form, he concentrated on scientific subjects. While there, he won an essay prize but did not contribute to the school magazine. In 1949 he moved up the road to King's College, Cambridge, where he read medicine for two years but left without taking a degree. However, the experience of dissecting cadavers left its mark on his imagination.

His reason for dropping out was the desire to become a writer. In May 1951 he was co-winner, with a piece called The Violent Noon, of a short story competition held by Varsity, the Cambridge student newspaper. (The other winner was DS Birley — later to become Sir Derek Birley, eminent educationalist and author of some classic cricket books.)

Ballard's father suggested that if he wanted to be a writer, he should resume his higher education at the University of London, reading English. This he did, but again he dropped out, after just one year. As he strove to become a writer, submitting stories unsuccessfully to literary magazines, he earned a living by various short-term jobs: Covent Garden flower market porter, advertising copywriter, door-to-door encyclopedia salesman.

Then, in 1954, he volunteered to join the RAF as a trainee pilot, despite being exempt from national service. It was a romantic impulse that sustained him for just one year, largely spent at a frozen airfield in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. The experience of flying (aircraft had been an obsession since boyhood) fed his imagination, but perhaps the most significant aspect of his time in Canada was his discovery, in the servicemen's canteen, of American science fiction magazines. Back home in 1955, awaiting discharge from the RAF, he wrote his first sci-fi story, Passport to Eternity, in emulation of US writer Jack Vance. It was eventually published in 1962.

Also in 1955 he married Mary Matthews, whom Ballard declared to be a great-niece of Cecil Rhodes. Their first child, a son, was born the following year, soon followed by two daughters. The family moved from digs in Notting Hill, west London, to a flat in Chiswick and then on to Shepperton, where they had settled by 1960. Ballard worked as a librarian and as a scriptwriter for a scientific film company.

His newfound enthusiasm for science fiction – particularly of the American, Galaxy magazine school – fed into his writing, and soon he was selling short stories to British sci-fi magazines. The first to appear was Prima Belladonna in Science Fantasy (1956).

At the same time, Ballard developed a strong interest in the visual arts, especially surrealism and the nascent pop art represented by the This is Tomorrow exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery, which he visited shortly after it opened in 1956. The editor of New Worlds, Ted Carnell, who was to become his literary agent for the first 10 years of his career, helped him obtain a new job, as assistant editor of The Baker, from which he soon moved on to the assistant editorship of a weekly science journal, Chemistry and Industry.

For four or five years, Ballard was a short story writer, a period that climaxed in 1960 with the publication of his remarkable tale, The Voices of Time. Set amid desert landscapes, in a moodily-depicted near-future world situated in a larger, declining universe, it introduced its readers to what Amis was later to call "the inner reaches of Ballard-land". After more than 20 magazine short stories, his first four books arrived in a burst in 1962 – The Wind from Nowhere and The Drowned World, and the collections The Voices of Time and Billenium, all published as 50 cent paperbacks by Berkley Books of New York.

The Drowned World appeared as a hardback in Britain early in 1963 to wide acclaim, along with the two follow-up collections issued by Gollancz, especially The Terminal Beach (1964). On the strength of this, and as the stories continued to spill out, Ballard became a full-time writer. Then tragedy struck. On a family holiday in Spain in September 1964, his wife contracted an infection and swiftly died of galloping pneumonia. As Aldiss was later to say: "It unhinged Jimmy for some while." He wrote nothing for about six months and drank too much. Nevertheless, resisting suggestions that he farm them out, he continued to care for his three children. "It was an extremely happy childhood," his daughter Fay said later. "Daddy sacrificed everything to bring us up. We had a lady who came in to change and wash the sheets every Friday, but apart from that he did everything, and he did it brilliantly. Our home was a nest, a lovely, warm family nest."

Gradually emerging from that nest in 1965-66, Ballard joined in the swinging 60s. His novels The Drought and The Crystal World appeared (both largely written before his wife's death); he became prose editor of the poetry magazine Ambit; and his friendship with the new, young editor of New Worlds, Michael Moorcock, led to fashionable parties, occasional drugs and new women friends. He was encouraged to experiment in his writing, beginning a "non-linear" phase with his story You and Me and the Continuum. He became something of a guru to a circle of younger sci-fi writers, some of them visiting Americans such as Thomas M Disch and Pamela Zoline. One of Moorcock's editorials was entitled Ballard: The Voice.

Stories appeared in Encounter, The Transatlantic Review and various small magazines. But no new novel would appear for seven years. His next significant book was The Atrocity Exhibition (1970), a collection of the nine so-called condensed novels plus half a dozen brief prose satires (the latter included his most infamous title, "Why I Want to Fuck Ronald Reagan").

His next novel, Crash (1973), was written in a state of what he later described as "willed madness". Enlarging on a theme first broached in the preceding book – the psycho-sexual role of the motor car in all our lives – it was to be his most extreme work, a Jean Genet-like rhapsody on all the conceivable erotic overtones of the car crash. (It was written as a motorway extension was being built past the end of his street in Shepperton.)

A fortnight after he delivered the manuscript, in February 1972, Ballard experienced his first car crash while coming home late one night from central London – "a case of life imitating art," as he said later. Fortunately, he was not badly hurt (and no one else was involved), but he was banned from driving for a year, during which he was inspired by this event and its aftermath to write another car crash novel, Concrete Island (1974). Crash itself received poor reviews in the British press but was acclaimed abroad and more than two decades later, it formed the basis of a provocative film directed by David Cronenberg.

Life seemed to quieten down for Ballard from the mid-1970s. He saw his children through school and university. He did not remarry, although he had a long-lasting relationship with Claire Churchill Walsh, whom he had first met in the late 1960s. His novels, High-Rise (1975), The Unlimited Dream Company (1979), and Hello America (1981), were well received, as were the short stories he had resumed writing.

But none of this prepared his readers for the surprise that was to come in 1984 when he published his largest novel to date, Empire of the Sun. It became a UK bestseller, gained him a new readership, and won the Guardian fiction prize. It failed to win the Booker prize, despite being the bookies' (and reviewers') favourite. A heavily fictionalised version of his childhood in Shanghai, it was hailed as a major war novel and it is likely to be the book upon which much of his reputation will rest. Ballard revisited North America for the first time since his RAF days to attend the Los Angeles premiere of the Steven Spielberg film of the novel in December 1987.

A quasi-sequel followed, The Kindness of Women (1991) – more of a sequence of short stories than a novel, based on his life story from 1937 to 1987. Like Empire of the Sun, it represented a fantastication of his autobiography and was a powerful and moving book, gaining high praise from British critics. To promote its launch, and at the behest of the BBC, he undertook another of his rare travels, his first visit to Shanghai since childhood, where interviews with him were shot for a memorable BBC Four Bookmark programme in 2004 entitled Shanghai Jim.

Other late novels included The Day of Creation (1987), a psychological fantasy set in an imaginary Africa; Rushing to Paradise (1994), a not entirely successful satire-cum-horror story set in the South Seas; Cocaine Nights (1996), the first of his crime and detection stories, set in the south of Spain; and Super-Cannes (2000), a crime novel set in a huge business park on the Riviera. The last was the best – sly, witty and extraordinarily inventive in its attack on eve-of-millennium complacency.

His Complete Short Stories appeared as a 1,200-page volume in 2001 and must rank as one of his greatest books. Had he never written a novel, this would still make Ballard a major writer. But there were to be no more short stories after the mid-1990s, and his last two novels, Millennium People (2003) and Kingdom Come (2006), showed failing powers.

His last book, the short but intensely moving memoir Miracles of Life: Shanghai to Shepperton (2008) – in which he revealed the news of his terminal illness to the world – was received with acclaim.

• James Graham Ballard, novelist, born November 15 1930, died 19 April 2009
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 26, 2009, 08:57:25 AM
No Bea Arthur news?  still in WV and on the Vista laptop so I don't have the emotional energy to go and get an obit...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on April 27, 2009, 12:19:45 PM
Yup, she croaked.  I was going to post it but then I decided to go fishing and forgot.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 27, 2009, 02:59:58 PM
 I didn't find out until I got in late last night.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 30, 2009, 12:49:16 PM
Quote
The Crossing of An Original Modern-Day Pioneering Ghost Hunter Who Broke The Haunted Barriers.

Professor, Parapsychologist, Writer, Humanitarian, Vegan, Spiritualist, Friend, Mentor, Son, Brother, Father, Grandfather and Spouse-Author, Dr. Hans Holzer.

Hans Holzer, known as the Father of the Paranormal, died Sunday at his Manhattan home after a long illness.

Dr. Hans Holzer, PhD, authored over 145 titles including Murder At Amityville, which was the basis for the 1982 film Amityville II: The Possession.

Having earned his PhD from the London College of Applied Science, he spent over five decades traveling the world to obtain first hand accounts of paranormal experiences, interviewing expert researchers, and developing parapsychological protocols and terminology such as 'sensitive' and 'beings of light'.

Holzer had hundreds of national and regional talk show appearances, co-hosting/hosting programs such as Ghost Hunter on Boston's Channel 2, NBC's In Search Of with Leonard Nemoy (an Alan Landsburg productions), Murder in Amityville, Beyond The Five Senses in Louisville, KY, Explorations with Brownville Productions in Ohio, Radio including a continuous segment with New York City's WOR with famed radio personality Joe Franklin who still is a family friend.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 03, 2009, 12:57:10 AM
Quote
Former Republican VP candidate, congressman Kemp dies



A onetime professional football player, Kemp served nine terms in Congress as a representative from New York and was former Sen. Bob Dole's running mate in 1996. He was a leading advocate of "supply-side" tax cuts, advancing the argument that cutting taxes would boost economic growth and yield more revenue for the federal government.

"The only way to oppose a bad idea is to replace it with a good idea, and I like to think that I have spent my life trying to promote good ideas," he told CNN in a 1996 interview.

Kemp "passed peacefully into the presence of the Lord" Sunday evening, a family statement said. He disclosed his illness in January.

"During the treatment of his cancer, Jack expressed his gratitude for the thoughts and prayers of so many friends, a gratitude which the Kemp family shares," the family said.

Kemp quarterbacked the Buffalo Bills to back-to-back American Football League championships in 1964 and 1965, before the merger that created the modern NFL. When he retired in 1970 after 13 seasons, the California native ran for Congress and represented the Buffalo area for 18 years in the House of Representatives.

"He championed free-market principles that improved the lives of millions of Americans and helped unleash an entrepreneurial spirit that all of us still benefit from today," Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, said in a statement issued late Saturday.

The 1981 tax cuts signed into law by Ronald Reagan, which cut marginal tax rates from 70 percent to 50 percent, bore Kemp's name as a co-sponsor. Critics mocked the policy as "trickle-down" economics and pointed to the decade's growing budget deficits as evidence that supply-side theories didn't work, but it has been GOP orthodoxy ever since.

Kemp mounted an unsuccessful presidential bid in 1988, losing the Republican primaries to George H.W. Bush. But once in office, Bush made Kemp his secretary of housing and urban development -- a post Kemp used to promote what he called an "empowerment" agenda of tax breaks for urban businesses and expanded home ownership.

Unlike many of the other conservatives of his era, Kemp actively courted African-American support. In 1992, he told CNN's "Larry King Live" that the GOP "could be a Lincoln party in terms of attracting black and brown and men and women of color and low-income status and immigrant status who want a shot at the American dream for their children."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on May 03, 2009, 02:54:18 AM
i hate when people "pass peacefully into the presence of the lord."  it sounds like a kama sutra move.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 03, 2009, 12:45:16 PM
Is this getting as much play nationally as it is locally?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on May 03, 2009, 02:36:34 PM
only in the red states!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 05, 2009, 02:01:13 PM
Quote
Comedic actor and cookbook author Dom DeLuise dies at 75


Brooklyn-born Dom DeLuise, the roly-poly movie foil to best buddy Burt Reynolds during a comedic career that spanned the last half-century, died Monday in Los Angeles. He was 75.

DeLuise, also a regular in director Mel Brooks's acclaimed comedies, passed away in his sleep at a Los Angeles hospital, according to TMZ.com.

DeLuise served as the rotund sidekick to matinee idol Reynolds in a series of films, an extension of their off-screen friendship.

The pair shared the big screen in "The End," "Cannonball Run I & II," "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas" and "Smokey & the Bandit II."

"I was dreading this moment," Reynolds said in a statement to "Entertainment Tonight."

"Dom always made everyone feel better when he was around," Reynolds said. "I never heard him say an unkind word about anyone. I will miss him very much."

It was Brooks who kicked DeLuise's career into high gear, using him in movies from "The Twelve Chairs" in 1970 to "Robin Hood: Men in Tights" in 1993.

The portly DeLuise poked fun at himself as the grossly overweight Pizza the Hutt in Brooks's "Star Wars" send-up "Spaceballs." He also appeared in "Blazing Saddles" and "Silent Movie."

DeLuise attended the High School of Performing Arts in New York, landing his first paying job as "Bernie the Dog" in a children's theater troupe production of "Bernie's Christmas Wish."

He considered becoming a high school biology teacher before landing a series of off-Broadway roles, eventually leading to his 1968 Broadway debut in Neil Simon's "Last of the Red Hot Lovers."

His movie debut had come four years earlier, in Sidney Lumet's 1964 nail-biter "Fail-Safe." And DeLuise became a television regular, appearing with stars like Garry Moore, Bob Newhart, Carol Burnett and the team of Rowan and Martin.

DeLuise hosted his own show, "The Dom DeLuise Variety Show."

The actor, known in his later years for his ever-present cap and salt-and-pepper beard, became one of Hollywood's most beloved characters.

In addition to his on- and off-screen collaborations with Brooks and Reynolds, DeLuise starred with pal Gene Wilder in "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother" and "The World's Greatest Lover."

He also co-starred with Anne Bancroft in "Fatso," a film written and directed by Bancroft, Brooks's wife.

DeLuise provided the voices in a series of animated movies, including "Tigar" in Steven Spielberg's "An American Tale" and "Itchy" in "All Dogs Go To Heaven."

DeLuise's talents went beyond his acting career. He wrote a pair of cookbooks, "Eat This!" and "Eat This, Too!", filled with his favorite Italian recipes. He also wrote a pair of children's books.

The life-long opera buff appeared several times at the Metropolitan Opera, earning kudos for his work as Frosh the Jailer in Die Fledermaus."

DeLuise also performed at the White House for presidents Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton.

He was the father of three sons - Peter, Michael and David - who followed DeLuise into acting. The quartet appeared together on several programs, including "3rd Rock From the Sun" and "SeaQuest DSV."

He and wife Carol were married for 43 years.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on May 05, 2009, 03:22:16 PM
Man, that sucks.  He was funny as shit. 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 03, 2009, 10:17:58 AM
Quote
Fantasy author David Eddings has sadly passed away, aged 77, last night. Best-selling and popular are often epithets that are applied to authors on writers' press releases, but in David's case, it was well deserved. His commercial success, says fantasy author Stephen Hunt, paved the way for a whole generation of doorstopper sized fantasy series.

http://www.sfcrowsnest.com/news/arc/2009/nz14000.php
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 03, 2009, 04:16:39 PM
More form Tor's blog:

http://www.tor.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=blog&id=31896
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 04, 2009, 11:08:41 AM
Oh...surprising...

Quote
Kill Bill and Kung Fu star David Carradine has been found dead in a Bangkok hotel room, BBC correspondent Jonathan Head has reported.

The 72-year-old was in Thailand filming his latest film Stretch, according to his personal manager Chuck Binder.

Mr Binder said the news was "shocking", adding: "He was full of life, always wanting to work... a great person."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 04, 2009, 11:17:26 AM
Damn... that is crazy.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 04, 2009, 11:39:51 AM
Damn... that is crazy.

Wait...what?

Quote
BANGKOK (AP) — Actor David Carradine, star of the 1970s TV series "Kung Fu" who also had a wide-ranging career in the movies, has been found dead in the Thai capital, Bangkok. A news report said he was found hanged in his hotel room and was believed to have committed suicide.

A spokesman for the U.S. Embassy, Michael Turner, confirmed the death of the 72-year-old actor. He said Carradine died either late Wednesday or early Thursday, but he could not provide further details out of consideration for his family.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 04, 2009, 11:48:53 AM
Whoa . . .
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 04, 2009, 11:58:20 AM
Jesus, this is today's big news item for me!  The Embassy refuses to say anything to Reuters, except to confirm that he's dead.  How weird to have all this respect all of a sudden.  Usually the media is dancing on the corpse.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 04, 2009, 12:18:29 PM
His agent is now saying that the suicide reports are unfounded.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on June 04, 2009, 12:53:50 PM
Wow...he was 72.  Had no idea.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 04, 2009, 01:01:15 PM
His agent is now saying that the suicide reports are unfounded.


Quote
"He was found hanging by a rope in the room's closet," Lieutenant Colonel Pirom Jantrapirom of the Lumpini police station in Bangkok told Reuters.

He said Carradine's body was naked when it was found and there were no signs of any other people in the room. The body has been transferred to a hospital for an autopsy.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 04, 2009, 01:25:39 PM
My friend pulled this off TMZ

Quote
In a 2004 interview dug up by the Telegraph Newspaper, the 72-year-old actor revealed that he once considered shooting himself, saying: "Look, there was a period in my life when I had a single action Colt 45, loaded, in my desk drawer.  And every night I'd take it out and think about blowing my head off, and then decide not to and go on with my life. Put it back in the drawer and open up the laptop and continue writing my autobiography or whatever. But it was just to see."

But there's more -- Carradine, who was also a musician, released a song on his website called Big Mack Truck, about a man who considers ending his life by walking into traffic. Here are some of the lyrics:

Does anyone know where I'm going ... does anyone here really care?

If I walk myself on a highway ... would that big mac truck be there?

Big mack truck .. big mack truck ... bearin' down on me.

Big mack truck on a highway .. oh say can you see ... can you see ... can you see?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 05, 2009, 10:58:30 AM
This is getting fun now...

Quote
Officials told reporters that the actor was found naked, curled up inside the wardrobe with one end of a shoelace tied around his penis and the other end fastened around his neck. Both of his hands were bound with a cord which was also tied around his neck.

It is believed Carradine died some 12 to 24 hours before he was found by the hotel maid. The head of the autopsy division at Bangkok’s Chulalongkorn Hospital called his death “abnormal”, but did not elaborate, according to local media.

Forensic experts have also reportedly found a footprint on the bed which did not match the shoes worn by the actor, the Bangkok Post reported. There was also a glass of water in the room and experts are checking to see if the drink had been tampered with. It is unclear if a second person was with him in the room when he died.

Carradine’s manager, however, told CNN’s Larry King that he had been told “there was foul play” involved.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 05, 2009, 12:18:00 PM
Holy shit!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 05, 2009, 01:25:01 PM
Quote
A member of the emergency crew who was called to the hotel after a maid found Carradine told CNN that a yellow nylon rope was tied around the actor's neck and a black rope was around his genitals. Police later confirmed that information.

"I do not know if you want to call it accidental," Chuck Binder, Carradine's manager, told CNN's Larry King on Thursday. He said Carradine's career was on a roll.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 05, 2009, 03:50:06 PM
Caine dies of Auto Erotic Asphyxiation?

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 05, 2009, 04:37:27 PM
Quote
David Carradine was found hanging in his Bangkok Hotel room on Wednesday. With his death still under investigation, a source close to Carradine told Tarts that the actor had been struggling with financial concerns but did not think the 72-year-old actor would have ever even considered taking his own life.

The source says Carradine desperately reached out to some friends in the business that he hadn’t been in contact with for quite some time just weeks ago, asking them to do whatever they could to help him boost the bank balance.

"David had been trying to make some fast cash doing personal appearances and things," said the source. "It was a rough year for him, and he was a big spender and always in debt, but he wouldn't have killed himself over finances. He wouldn't have hung himself, that was too much effort. His ego would never have let him do that."

Nathan Folks, producer of the 2004 film "Last Goodbye," in which Carradine starred with his daughter Kansas, told Tarts that Carradine was "definitely not" suicidal. Pop Tarts also spoke to actress Bai Ling who worked with Carradine on the action comedy "Crank: High Voltage" which was released earlier this year.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on June 05, 2009, 11:09:21 PM
see, i was going to suggest this, but thought it might be disrespectful.  you're hanging out in bangkok, you're a big martial arts guy, you're rockin' and rollin'...maybe that's what it takes to get off these days. 

or stringer bell faked it to make it look that way!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 07, 2009, 09:42:19 PM
Quote
US Watergate 'plumber' dies

MIAMI (AFP) – Bernard Leon Barker, one of the last surviving "plumbers" who broke into the Watergate building in a scandal that led to the 1974 resignation of president Richard Nixon, died in Florida at age 92, the Miami Herald reported.

Barker and four colleagues working for a special White House office were caught breaking into Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters in the Watergate complex in Washington in June 1972.

The team known as the "plumbers" -- tasked with stopping information leaks -- broke into the DNC office to plant microphones.

The "burglars" however were surprised and later charged and convicted along with two White House advisers.

Barker, the son of Americans living in Cuba, enlisted in the US Army during World War II and flew in bombing raids over Germany. He was shot down and served 18 months in a prisoner of war camp, the Herald reported.

After the war he worked for the Central Intelligence Agency and helped organize anti-communist Cuban exiles in south Florida who participated in the failed Bay of Pigs operation in an attempt to topple the Fidel Castro regime in 1961.

The exiles landed on a Cuban beach in April and were defeated after sustaining massive losses. Barker survived and managed to return to Florida.

Barker's old boss at the CIA later recruited him for the special White House "plumbers" operations.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 08, 2009, 11:24:16 AM
I guess it's time to stop clogging up this thread with Carradine... I'm just fascinated by it:

Quote
BANGKOK/LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The family of actor David Carradine has asked U.S. authorities to help unravel the mystery of his death, amid conflicting reports about how his body was found hanging naked in a Bangkok hotel.

Mark Geragos, a Los Angeles attorney who represented Carradine's brother, Keith Carradine, said on Saturday the family has contacted the Federal Bureau of Investigation and filed a formal request to have the FBI contact authorities in Thailand for further information.

"They've done it because of the conflicting reports and the nature of those reports that have given the family great pause," Geragos told Reuters.

Speculation about the death of Carradine, 72, who starred in the 1970s-era U.S. television show "Kung Fu" and the more recent "Kill Bill" movies, has deepened since his body was discovered on Thursday by a maid in the Bangkok hotel suite where he was staying while filming the movie "Stretch."

With coroners awaiting results of toxicology tests, Thai media pointed to suicide or accidental autoerotic asphyxiation as possible causes of death. Some reports have said a cord was wrapped around Carradine's genitals and others that his hands were bound behind his back. None could be confirmed.

Geragos said Carradine's family had no more information than what had been written and said in the media, which was why they were seeking the FBI's help.

"I wish for them, and their sake, that they did (have more information), but it's the opposite," Geragos said. "They are getting reports that both seem conflicting and evolving."

FAMILY SEEKS HELP

Geragos said Thai authorities must invite the FBI into the investigation and he did not know how long that might take.

The family has hired forensic pathologist Dr. Michael Baden, a former chief medical examiner for New York City who appears on HBO cable TV show "Autopsy," to look into the death when Carradine's body returns to the U.S.

Thai television said the body was flown home to Los Angeles early on Saturday, which Geragos confirmed.

Representatives for the family in Los Angeles were not immediately available for further comment Saturday evening.

In Bangkok, police said it could take several weeks for coroners to confirm exactly how Carradine died.

"What we're doing right now is interviewing more witnesses," Police Colonel Somprasong Yentuam told Reuters.

"It should take roughly three weeks for the blood test result, then we can wrap this case up." Somprasong said he believed the likely cause of death was asphyxiation.

A maid found Carradine hanging in the closet of his hotel suite at Bangkok's Swissotel Nai Lert Park hotel. Initial reports indicated a possible suicide, but family representatives have repeatedly denied that possibility.

Carradine, the son of the late character actor John Carradine, enjoyed a long career on Broadway, TV and in films. But he was most famous for his role in "Kung Fu," playing Caine, a martial arts specialist who wandered through the American Old West seeking wisdom and beating up bad guys.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on June 08, 2009, 01:39:49 PM
Quote
US Watergate 'plumber' dies

MIAMI (AFP) – Bernard Leon Barker, one of the last surviving "plumbers" who broke into the Watergate building in a scandal that led to the 1974 resignation of president Richard Nixon, died in Florida at age 92, the Miami Herald reported.

Barker and four colleagues working for a special White House office were caught breaking into Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters in the Watergate complex in Washington in June 1972.

The team known as the "plumbers" -- tasked with stopping information leaks -- broke into the DNC office to plant microphones.

The "burglars" however were surprised and later charged and convicted along with two White House advisers.

Barker, the son of Americans living in Cuba, enlisted in the US Army during World War II and flew in bombing raids over Germany. He was shot down and served 18 months in a prisoner of war camp, the Herald reported.

After the war he worked for the Central Intelligence Agency and helped organize anti-communist Cuban exiles in south Florida who participated in the failed Bay of Pigs operation in an attempt to topple the Fidel Castro regime in 1961.

The exiles landed on a Cuban beach in April and were defeated after sustaining massive losses. Barker survived and managed to return to Florida.

Barker's old boss at the CIA later recruited him for the special White House "plumbers" operations.

Wow...what a life! 

Shot down, POW, Pay of Pigs participant, intimately involved in the biggest presidential scandal in US history!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on June 08, 2009, 01:44:04 PM
I guess it's time to stop clogging up this thread with Carradine... I'm just fascinated by it:

Me too.

Family representatives have repeatedly denied the possibility of this being suicide.   Yet, what facts do they actually have?  Nothing...just "he would never do that!" 

I mean, if my brother killed himself...I'd sure be surprised, but I think I'd be open to the fact that it was not some crazy conspiracy.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 08, 2009, 01:47:22 PM
Well, I think what might be confusing them is that there are so many different stories about it.  I mean, I've heard at least 3 different stories about how he was found, so at least for now I'm in agreement with them that it probably wasn't a suicide... not an intentional one anyway.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 11, 2009, 09:33:50 AM
Shit just keeps getting weirder. Those Thai tabloid photos have to be on Al Gore's interwebs, right?

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2009/06/10/2009-06-10_thai_tabloid_david_carradine_photos_show_fishets_wig_womens_lingerie.html (http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2009/06/10/2009-06-10_thai_tabloid_david_carradine_photos_show_fishets_wig_womens_lingerie.html)

Quote
Report: Thai tabloid David Carradine photos show fishnets, wig, women's lingerie

The photos of David Carradine's body printed in a Thai tabloid show the actor wearing what appear to be fishnets and a wig, according to a report in ABCNews.com, raising new questions about the circumstances of his mysterious death.

The images – which apparently show the actor hanging from a bar in the closet of his Bangkok hotel room – also reveal what appears to be red women's lingerie on a nearby bed, ABC reports.

Carradine's remains were due to arrive in Los Angeles this week and New York's famed forensic pathologist Dr. Michael Baden was scheduled to conduct an investigation.

"Baden is one of the most experienced forensic pathologists in the world. If there's something suspicious, he'll find it," his friend Dr. Lawrence Kobilinsky, chairman of the Department of Forensic Sciences at John Jay College of Criminal Justice told the Daily News Tuesday.

Thai authorities have ruled Carradine's June 4 death a"sex accident" due to autoerotic asphyxiation gone wrong. The"Kung Fu" actor, 72, was found with his wrists, neck and genitals bound by a rope.

Transvestite role-playing – as suggested by the presence of women's undergarments – is often part of autoerotic stimulation.

Images from the actor's autopsy in Thailand have also circulated.  A photograph from that autopsy viewed by the Daily News showed the actor's nude body laid out on a coroner's table with many visible tattoos.  Those images have not been published.

Carradine's family members have continued to question that conclusion, wondering how the actor could have bound his own wrists and saying the evidence suggests foul play.

Filmmaker Robert Dunlap – who made a documentary about people who engage in deviant sex practices – echoed those doubts to ABCNews.com "This doesn't look like a solo act at all," Dunlap told ABCNews.com. "In order to have an orgasm, his hands would have had to be free."

Referencing the apparent presence of women's lingerie, he added,"You don't dress just for yourself … Usually there is some sort of show and someone else is involved. It probably went horribly bad and they left."

Two of Carradine's ex-wives have spoken publicly on his unusual sexual preferences.

His third wife Gail Jensen said he liked to tie himself up at home and ride horses bareback wearing nothing by a Speedo in an interview with RadarOnline.com.

His fourth wife Marina Anderson alleged in 2003 divorce papers obtained by theSmokingGun.com that Carradine practiced "deviant sexual behavior which was potentially deadly" and said he engaged in an "incestuous relationship with a very close family member."

In a separate interview with TMZ.com , Jensen – who divorced Carradine in 1997 – said the actor was able to tie himself up without assistance and did so at home.

"He spent days planning a different feature. He would go to a hardware store and buy the stuff," Jensen said.

No plans for a funeral for the actor have been announced.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 11, 2009, 11:27:01 AM
Ridin horses in a Speedo
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 11, 2009, 05:11:05 PM
Lame...
(http://i43.tinypic.com/zwb7s2.jpg)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 11, 2009, 05:18:19 PM
Very lame.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 15, 2009, 11:00:49 AM
Quote
Paul O. Williams, 1935-2009    

Paul O. Williams died June 2, 2009 from an aortic dissection. His most notable work was the Pelbar Cycle, a series of seven novels set in post-apocalyptic Illinois. He won the Campbell Award in 1983, and published two other science fiction novels outside of the Pelbar novels; the most recent was The Man from Far Cloud in 2004. He was also a poet, served as president of the Haiku Society of America, and was professor emeritus of English at Principia College in Elsah IL. He is survived by his wife, KerryLynn Blau Williams.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_O._Williams

Breaking of Northwall is next on my reading list... (And a Christmas Gift from Reggie.)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 23, 2009, 09:56:40 AM
Quote
`Tonight' sidekick Ed McMahon dies in LA at 86

LOS ANGELES – Ed McMahon, the loyal "Tonight Show" sidekick who bolstered boss Johnny Carson with guffaws and a resounding "H-e-e-e-e-e-ere's Johnny!" for 30 years, has died at a Los Angeles hospital. He was 86.

Publicist Howard Bragman says McMahon died early Tuesday at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center surrounded by his family.

Bragman didn't give a cause of death, saying only that McMahon had a "multitude of health problems the last few months."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 25, 2009, 02:06:30 PM
Quote
‘Charlie’s Angel’ Farrah Fawcett dies at 62

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Farrah Fawcett, whose luxurious tresses and blinding smile helped redefine sex appeal in the 1970s as one of TV’s “Charlie’s Angels,“ died Thursday after battling cancer. She was 62.

The pop icon, who in the 1980s set aside the fantasy girl image to tackle serious roles, died Thursday shortly before 9:30 a.m. PDT in a Santa Monica hospital, spokesman Paul Bloch said.

She burst on the scene in 1976 as one-third of the crime-fighting trio in TV’s “Charlie’s Angels.“ A poster of her in a clingy swimsuit sold in the millions.

She left the show after one season but had a flop on the big screen with “Somebody Killed Her Husband.“ She turned to more serious roles in the 1980s and 1990s, winning praise playing an abused wife in “The Burning Bed.“

She had been diagnosed with anal cancer in 2006. As she underwent treatment, she enlisted the help of actor Ryan O’Neal, who had been her longtime companion and was the father of her son, Redmond, born in 1985.

This month, O’Neal said he asked Fawcett to marry him and she agreed. They would wed “as soon as she can say yes,“ he said.

Her struggle with painful treatments and dispiriting setbacks was recorded in the television documentary “Farrah’s Story.“ Fawcett sought cures in Germany as well as the United States, battling the disease with iron determination even as her body weakened.

“Her big message to people is don’t give up, no matter what they say to you, keep fighting,“ her friend Alana Stewart said. NBC estimated the May 15, 2009, broadcast drew nearly 9 million viewers.

In the documentary, Fawcett was seen shaving off most of her trademark locks before chemotherapy could claim them. Toward the end, she’s seen huddled in bed, barely responding to a visit from her son.

Fawcett, Kate Jackson and Jaclyn Smith comprised the original “Angels,“ the sexy, police-trained trio of martial arts experts who took their assignments from a rich, mysterious boss named Charlie (John Forsythe, who was never seen on camera but whose distinctive voice was heard on speaker phone.)

The program debuted in September 1976, the height of what some critics derisively referred to as television’s “jiggle show” era, and it gave each of the actresses ample opportunity to show off their figures as they disguised themselves in bathing suits and as hookers and strippers to solve crimes.

Backed by a clever publicity campaign, Fawcett — then billed as Farrah Fawcett-Majors because of her marriage to “Six Million Dollar Man” star Lee Majors — quickly became the most popular Angel of all.

Her face helped sell T-shirts, lunch boxes, shampoo, wigs and even a novelty plumbing device called Farrah’s faucet. Her flowing blond hair, pearly white smile and trim, shapely body made her a favorite with male viewers in particular.

A poster of her in a dampened red swimsuit sold millions of copies and became a ubiquitous wall decoration in teenagers’ rooms.

Thus the public and the show’s producer, Spelling-Goldberg, were shocked when she announced after the series’ first season that she was leaving television’s No. 5-rated series to star in feature films. (Cheryl Ladd became the new “Angel” on the series.)

But the movies turned out to be a platform where Fawcett was never able to duplicate her TV success. Her first star vehicle, the comedy-mystery “Somebody Killed Her Husband,“ flopped and Hollywood cynics cracked that it should have been titled “Somebody Killed Her Career.“

The actress had also been in line to star in “Foul Play” for Columbia Pictures. But the studio opted for Goldie Hawn instead. “Spelling-Goldberg warned all the studios that that they would be sued for damages if they employed me,“ Fawcett told The Associated Press in 1979. “The studios wouldn’t touch me.“

She finally reached an agreement to appear in three episodes of “Charlie’s Angels” a season, an experience she called “painful.“

She returned to making movies, including the futuristic thriller “Logan’s Run,“ the comedy-thriller “Sunburn” and the strange sci-fi tale “Saturn 3,“ but none clicked with the public.

Fawcett fared better with television movies such as “Murder in Texas,“ ‘'Poor Little Rich Girl” and especially as an abused wife in 1984’s “The Burning Bed.“ The last earned her an Emmy nomination and the long-denied admission from critics that she really could act.

As further proof of her acting credentials, Fawcett appeared off-Broadway in “Extremities” as a woman who is raped in her own home. She repeated the role in the 1986 film version.

Not content to continue playing victims, she switched type. She played a murderous mother in the 1989 true-crime story “Small Sacrifices” and a tough lawyer on the trail of a thief in 1992’s “Criminal Behavior.“

She also starred in biographies of Nazi-hunter Beate Klarsfeld and photographer Margaret Bourke-White.

“I felt that I was doing a disservice to ourselves by portraying only women as victims,“ she commented in a 1992 interview.

In 1995, at age 50, Fawcett posed partly nude for Playboy magazine. The following year, she starred in a Playboy video, “All of Me,“ in which she was equally unclothed while she sculpted and painted.

She told an interviewer she considered the experience “a renaissance,“ adding, “I no longer feel ... restrictions emotionally, artistically, creatively or in my everyday life. I don’t feel those borders anymore.“

Fawcett’s most unfortunate career moment may have been a 1997 appearance on David Letterman’s show, when her disjointed, rambling answers led many to speculate that she was on drugs. She denied that, blaming her strange behavior on questionable advice from her mother to be playful and have a good time.

In September 2006, Fawcett, who at 59 still maintained a strict regimen of tennis and paddleball, began to feel strangely exhausted. She underwent two weeks of tests and was told the devastating news: She had anal cancer.

O’Neal, with whom she had a 17-year relationship, again became her constant companion, escorting her to the hospital for chemotherapy.

“She’s so strong,“ the actor told a reporter. “I love her. I love her all over again.“

She struggled to maintain her privacy, but a UCLA Medical Center employee pleaded guilty in late 2008 to violating federal medical privacy law for commercial purposes for selling records of Fawcett and other celebrities to the National Enquirer.

“It’s much easier to go through something and deal with it without being under a microscope,“ she told the Los Angeles Times in an interview in which she also revealed that she helped set up a sting that led to the hospital worker’s arrest.

Her decision to tell her own story through the NBC documentary was meant as an inspiration to others, friends said. The segments showing her cancer treatment, including a trip to Germany for procedures there, were originally shot for a personal, family record, they said. And although weak, she continued to show flashes of grit and good humor in the documentary.

“I do not want to die of this disease. So I say to God, ‘It is seriously time for a miracle,‘“ she said at one point.

Born Feb. 2, 1947, in Corpus Christi, Texas, she was named Mary Farrah Leni Fawcett by her mother, who said she added the Farrah because it sounded good with Fawcett. She was less than a month old when she underwent surgery to remove a digestive tract tumor with which she was born.

After attending Roman Catholic grade school and W.B. Ray High School, Fawcett enrolled at the University of Texas at Austin. Fellow students voted her one of the 10 most beautiful people on the campus and her photos were eventually spotted by movie publicist David Mirisch, who suggested she pursue a film career. After overcoming her parents’ objections, she agreed.

Soon she was appearing in such TV shows as “That Girl,“ ‘'The Flying Nun,“ ‘'I Dream of Jeannie” and “The Partridge Family.“

Majors became both her boyfriend and her adviser on career matters, and they married in 1973. She dropped his last name from hers after they divorced in 1982.

By then she had already begun her long relationship with O’Neal. The couple never married. Both Redmond and Ryan O’Neal have grappled with drug and legal problems in recent years.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 25, 2009, 02:07:19 PM
Oh...sad.  Good old Farrah.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 25, 2009, 02:47:41 PM
Damn... that is sad.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 25, 2009, 06:55:50 PM
Quote
Michael Jackson suffers heart attack at home and is rushed to hospital, confirm LA police

By Rosalind Ryan
Last updated at 10:53 PM on 25th June 2009

Singer Michael Jackson is believed to have suffered a heart attack at his home in Los Angeles this afternoon.
Reports say that Jackson, 50, went into cardiac arrest and has been rushed to hospital.

He was seen being taken into an ambulance by Los Angeles Fire Department paramedics and moved to the UCLA Medical Centre, says US gossip website TMZ.

The Los Angeles Times reported that Jackson was not breathing when paramedics arrived at his home.
 Sell out shows: The singer is due to start a land-mark tour at the 02 in London next month
TMZ is now reporting that Jackson has died, although this has yet to be confirmed by other sources.
Captain Steve Ruda told the LA Times that paramedics responded to a call at Jackson's home around 8:26p.m.

The parademics performed cardiopulmonary resucitation on Jackson and took him to UCLA Medical Center.
Jackson's mother was said to be at the hospital to meet her son.
It is believed a call to 911 was made from his home in Holmby Hills, LA, at 12.21pm (8.21pm).

A member of the Jackson family told TMZ that 'Michael is in really bad shape'.
An update on the website says, 'We just got off the phone with Joe Jackson, Michael's dad, who says "he is not doing well".'
The singer is due to play 50 sell-out shows at London's O2 Arena starting in July.
But the King of Pop has already had to postpone the first few nights' shows.
Organisers AEG Live said this was in order to make sure everything for the 'massive and technically complex show' was running smoothly.
But critics say ongoing concerns about Jackson's health are the real reason behind the gigs having to be postponed.
Earlier this year, Jackson was seen emerging from a doctors three times in one week amid rumours that he is battling skin cancer.
The claims were denied by his representatives.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 25, 2009, 07:09:06 PM
TMZ seems to be the only one saying that he is dead at this point

Quote
Michael Jackson Dies
Posted Jun 25th 2009 5:20PM by TMZ Staff

We've just learned Michael Jackson has died. He was 50.

Michael suffered a cardiac arrest earlier this afternoon at his Holmby Hills home and paramedics were unable to revive him. We're told when paramedics arrived Jackson had no pulse and they never got a pulse back.

A source tells us Jackson was dead when paramedics arrived.

Once at the hospital, the staff tried to resuscitate him but he was completely unresponsive.

We're told one of the staff members at Jackson's home called 911.

La Toya ran in the hospital sobbing after Jackson was pronounced dead.

Michael is survived by three children: Michael Joseph Jackson, Jr., Paris Michael Katherine Jackson and Prince "Blanket" Michael Jackson II.

They've already got damn "Remembering Michael" banners up and everything.  Insane.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Tatertots on June 25, 2009, 07:20:43 PM
TMZ's probably full of shit.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 25, 2009, 07:36:58 PM
NPR is saying LA Times reports him in a coma.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 25, 2009, 07:38:00 PM
MSNBC says NBC confirms he's been pronounced dead.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 25, 2009, 07:39:31 PM
Multiple sources now saying he has died.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Tatertots on June 25, 2009, 07:41:44 PM
Yeah, all the big outlets are reporting it now.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 25, 2009, 07:56:52 PM
Yep, confirmed.  Amazing...it was like fucking 9/11 on the bus ride home.  Everyone's cell phone ringing, people getting emotional when they took the call.

I'm a bit shocked myself.  God... Talk about a major piece of my childhood!  Do you remember where you were when the Thriller video premiered?

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Tatertots on June 25, 2009, 08:15:30 PM
Amademajad had a role in this!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 25, 2009, 09:11:51 PM
Or Farrah Fawcett.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on June 25, 2009, 09:29:03 PM
or paul mccartney.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 25, 2009, 09:34:18 PM
I was 5 when Thriller came out... the dawn of MTV.  I can remember sitting all day in front of MTV just waiting for Beat It, Billie Jean or Thriller to come on.  We had a copy of the album dubbed onto cassette and listened to it every day in the car.  Michael was definitely a huge part of my early childhood.  This is just very shocking to me... more shocking than I would have imagined it was going to be.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 25, 2009, 09:40:16 PM
We cut our drive to Deep Creek Lake short and looked for a hotel so the whole family could gather in front of the TV for Thriller.  14 minutes of family fun dancing zombies!  Took three tries before we found a hotel with cable.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 25, 2009, 09:42:29 PM
Oh yeah... did you ever see the Thriller documentary?  It was awesome... it had a bunch of behind the scenes stuff with Michael getting into makeup and zombies rehearsing their walks and dance moves.  We had friends who's parents had recorded it onto VHS when it was aired and we watched it every time we'd go over to their house for dinner.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 25, 2009, 09:43:28 PM
Yeah.  That's the one with Drunken Vincent Price, right?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 26, 2009, 12:03:50 AM
There's a small part of me that's secretly relieved. MJ had become almost a literal shell of who he was. Being a kid in the 80s, growing up with the music and the videos was amazing. That kind of mass media celebrity was new back then. He was a new god in his prime. Something larger than anything else. What he became was somehow sad, and pathetic: a fallen Deity.

As a horror fan, the Thriller video was seminal. It ranks up there with the best zombie movies of the 80s. (It's also arguably John Landis' best work.) It was well done AND it was scary. All those early MTV videos were great.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on June 26, 2009, 12:50:46 AM
It feels pretty weird.  I don't know if anyone else famous tops this for me.  Regan was big for me...but I think this is more.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 26, 2009, 07:10:25 AM
It feels pretty weird.  I don't know if anyone else famous tops this for me.  Regan was big for me...but I think this is more.

Because of what RC said... I'm feeling the same.  We deified these pop stars when we were kids.  Reagan was big, but you kind of expect presidents to die.  And presidents fade away anyway, unless they die on office.  All of these pop/media icons are a part of our lives from childhood onwards.

What are we going to do when they find Hassolhoff in a Bangkok closet?

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 26, 2009, 07:25:42 AM
Watching Thriller again now and, yeah RC, funny to think that it might well be Landis' best work.  Poor bastard.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 26, 2009, 07:39:28 AM
Well, here's a good version of Thriller, so you don't have to suffer Youtube:

http://www.sendspace.com/file/zk80w2


Reggie, is that in the Bible?  Thou shalt not suffer a poorly encoded VHS rip on Youtube?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 26, 2009, 09:35:19 AM
I loved MJ as a kid. And MTV was this new crazy thing that captured me and just about everybody else. He was a huge part of that. "Billie Jean" and "Beat It" were both like mini-movies. And then there was the hype leading up to the release of the "Thriller" video. I was just getting into horror films at the time too, so I was even more primed for it. And because it was MJ, my parents felt it was okay to let me watch it. (They didn't feel that way about, say, Friday the 13th.)

Dude, when he turned into that werewolf in the opening scene? That was some crazy, badass shit.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 26, 2009, 10:20:10 AM
Raise your hand if you saw Captain Eo in 3D at Epcot Center!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on June 26, 2009, 10:26:20 AM
Reggie, is that in the Bible?  Thou shalt not suffer a poorly encoded VHS rip on Youtube?

Yeah, that's almost verbatim what it says in Second Betamax 5:19.  Of course it uses "Video Cassette," but I'm sure a more modern version will be along before too much longer.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 26, 2009, 10:27:16 AM
This is where I muse about Boble 2.0: The Digital Edition.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on June 26, 2009, 10:53:43 AM
Raise your hand if you saw Captain Eo in 3D at Epcot Center!

*raises hand twice*
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 26, 2009, 12:41:22 PM
hee hee


wooooooooooooooo!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 26, 2009, 03:29:58 PM
Now we start this...
Quote
Tmz.com said Jackson received a daily injection of Demerol, a synthetic narcotic similar to morphine, but was given "too much" on Thursday.

Los Angeles police want to talk to the doctor - who lived at the star's home and administered his injections - but he has not yet been found, the entertainment website said.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 26, 2009, 03:34:31 PM
I'm sure he was on tons of prescription drugs, but I'll wait the two months for the official coroner's report to float in.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Tatertots on June 26, 2009, 04:13:53 PM
If we spin this off into a new thread, can we call it The Jackson 4?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on June 26, 2009, 04:14:24 PM
better get Quincy on the case!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Tatertots on June 26, 2009, 04:16:31 PM
Tainted Glove!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 26, 2009, 04:41:52 PM
It just hit me that the guy playing the steel drum outside the Metro at lunch was playing "Say, Say, Say."  It was awesome...but the song didn't click until now.  Been stuck in my head for 90 minutes!

Also, fuck you Linda.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 26, 2009, 04:49:25 PM
I was so gay for that "Pipes of Peace" album when I was nine.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 26, 2009, 04:53:14 PM
Sorry, what?  I was just dancing on Linda's grave there.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 26, 2009, 04:55:49 PM
I'm sure he was on tons of prescription drugs, but I'll wait the two months for the official coroner's report to float in.

Yeah, my friend is feeding me quotes from reports that are saying he had a pretty serious drug addiction and that an "intervention" was being set up.  A lot of people are apparently speculating that it was a morphine overdose.  Of course, with the amount of shit flying around right now, the truth is impossible to discern.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 26, 2009, 06:32:47 PM
I'm sure there's some sort of drug addiction problem involved, but it'll be closer to Heath Ledger than Jim Morrison.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on June 26, 2009, 09:28:15 PM
and so was established RC's continuum of celebrity drug deaths.  where does Lane Staley fit on there?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on June 27, 2009, 01:42:16 AM
Also, fuck you Linda.


Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 27, 2009, 09:33:00 AM
and so was established RC's continuum of celebrity drug deaths.  where does Lane Staley fit on there?

Layne Staley is over with Shannon Hoon . . . some where around Mama Cass, Jimi Hendrix, and Keith Moon but not quite down with the lead singer of Drowning Pool.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on July 01, 2009, 03:41:47 PM
Michael actually referenced Demerol in one of his songs around 15 years ago.


Michael's late temp father-in-law, Elvis, was also a regular user of the aforesaid substance (among a plethora of others of course).

'The girl is mine' was always the lamest of the PMC-MJ duets, if you ask me.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 01, 2009, 04:32:09 PM
Screw Michael!  Mrs. Slocombe died!

Quote
Comedy star Mollie Sugden has died

14 minutes ago

Comedy actress Mollie Sugden has died in hospital following a long illness, aged 86.

The Yorkshire-born star of popular sitcom Are You Being Served? died in the Royal Surrey County Hospital in Guildford on Wednesday afternoon.

Her twin sons, Robin and Simon Moore, were at her bedside, according to her agent Joan Reddin.

Ms Reddin began representing Sugden in the 1960s before she became famous with her role as Mrs Slocombe in Are You Being Served?.

She said: "She had had a long illness and various problems but it was very quick in the end. Her twin boys were with her and she faded away. She was a lovely, lovely person."

Sugden, who lived in Surrey, was married to fellow actor William Moore.

She never fully recovered from his death nine years ago, said Ms Reddin. "They were very much in love," she said. "She started to go down when he died."

Best known for her comedy roles often playing battleaxes, Sugden also appeared as the fearsome Mrs Hutchinson in The Liver Birds, but her career spanned a variety of roles.

Born in Keighley, West Yorkshire, in July 1922, Sugden trained at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London. Her early career was spent in repertory theatre, where in Swansea in 1956, she met Moore.

They married two years later, when she was 35 and he was 39. Their sons were born six years later.

Copyright © 2009 The Press Association. All rights reserved.
Add News to your iGoogle Homepage Add News to your Google Homepage
The Press Association

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on July 01, 2009, 08:46:23 PM
Her Pussy is still alive.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 01, 2009, 10:07:06 PM
We're watching AYBS now and mourning her.  Glass of water for Mr. Grainger!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 05, 2009, 11:12:35 AM
Sad way to go out.

Quote
Ex-NFL QB Steve McNair, woman found slain in Tenn.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Police were working Sunday to unravel the relationship between slain former NFL quarterback Steve McNair and his friend, a 20-year-old woman who was found shot to death alongside him in his downtown condominium.

McNair, who led the famous Tennessee Titans' drive that came a yard short of forcing overtime in the 2000 Super Bowl, was found dead on a sofa in the living room Saturday with multiple gunshot wounds, including one to the head. His friend, Sahel Kazemi, was very close to him on the floor, killed by a single gunshot. A pistol was discovered near her, but police said it took a while to find the firearm.

Authorities didn't immediately say who was to blame for the killings, but they weren't looking for any suspects.

McNair, 36, and Kazemi were together just two days earlier, when she was pulled over driving a 2007 Escalade registered to her and McNair. She was arrested on a DUI charges, and he was allowed to leave in a taxi.

McNair and Kazemi apparently knew each other from a restaurant the quarterback and his family frequented, but workers there wouldn't talk about their relationship. Police also refused to release any details about their relationship, simply calling Kazemi a "friend."

Autopsies were planned for Sunday.

Police spokesman Don Aaron said McNair's wife, Mechelle, is "very distraught."

"At this juncture, we do not believe she is involved," he said. "Nothing has been ruled out, but as far as actively looking for a suspect tonight, the answer would be no."

Fred McNair, Steve McNair's oldest brother, said some family members likely will travel to Nashville on Monday to consult with Mechelle.

"It's still kind of hard to believe," Fred McNair said. "He was the greatest person in the world. He gave back to the community. He loved kids and he wanted to be a role model to kids."

He said he did not know who Kazemi was.

The bodies were discovered by McNair's longtime friend, Wayne Neeley, who rents the condo with McNair. Neeley told authorities he went into the condo, saw McNair and Kazemi, but walked first into the kitchen before going back into the living room.

Neeley then called a friend, who alerted authorities.

Police said a witness saw McNair arrive at the condo in the upscale Rutledge Hill neighborhood between 1:30 and 2 a.m. Saturday and that Kazemi's vehicle was already there. The condominium is located within walking distance of an area filled with restaurants and nightspots, a few blocks from the Cumberland River and within view of the Titans' stadium.

An arrest affidavit from Thursday said Kazemi had bloodshot eyes and alcohol on her breath when she was pulled over, but refused a breathalyzer test, saying "she was not drunk, she was high."

McNair and his family frequented the restaurant where Kazemi was a waitress, according employees and patrons of Dave & Buster's in Nashville. Keith Norfleet, Kazemi's ex-boyfriend, told The Tennessean newspaper that McNair and Kazemi met at the restaurant.

"She was reliable 90 percent of the time," manager Chris Truelove said of Kazemi. "She was pretty outgoing. A lot of the guests liked being around her, and she liked being around the guests."

Co-worker Shantez Jobe, 33, she said was friends with Kazemi.

"We talked about who had more fashion sense, and who was the cutest, and who could get more boys, you know some of the stuff girls do," Jobe said.

In June, McNair opened a restaurant near the Tennessee State University campus. It was closed Saturday evening, but had become a small memorial, where flowers, candles and notes had been placed outside the door.

McNair, a four-time Pro Bowl selection, led the Titans to the 2000 Super Bowl, which they lost 23-16 to the St. Louis Rams. He was co-MVP of the NFL with Colts quarterback Peyton Manning in 2003. He also played for the Baltimore Ravens before retiring in April 2008.

His most notable moment came in the 2000 Super Bowl. With the Titans trailing by seven, he led the team 87 yards in the final minute and 48 seconds, only to come up a yard short of a touchdown. Kevin Dyson caught his 9-yard pass, but was tackled at the 1-yard line by the Rams' Mike Jones.

McNair accounted for all of Tennessee's yards in that drive, throwing for 48 yards and rushing for 14. The rest of the yardage came on penalties against the Rams. Before that, he brought the Titans back from a 16-0 deficit to tie the game.

"If you were going to draw a football player, the physical part, the mental part, everything about being a professional, he is your guy," former Ravens and Titans teammate Samari Rolle said. "I can't even wrap my arms around it."

McNair grew up in rural Mount Olive, Miss., and became a nationally known college football star playing for Alcorn State, a Division I-AA school in his home state. He was so dominant in the Southwestern Athletic Conference, he became a Heisman Trophy contender. National media flocked to little Lorman in the southwest corner of the Magnolia state to get a look at "Air McNair." He still holds the Division I-AA (now known as Football Championship Subdivision) records for career yards passing (14,496) and total offense (16,823).

McNair was the third overall draft pick in 1995 by the Houston Oilers, who eventually became the Titans. He finished his career with 31,304 yards passing and 174 touchdowns. McNair's rugged style led to numerous injuries and aches. He played with pain for several years, and the injuries ultimately forced him to retire.

"On the field, there isn't a player that was as tough as him, especially at the quarterback position," the Ravens' Derrick Mason said.

During a five-game stretch at the end of the 2002 season, McNair was so bruised he couldn't practice. But he started all five games and won them, leading the Titans to an 11-5 record and a berth in the AFC championship game for the second time in four seasons.

McNair played all 16 games in 2006, his first season in Baltimore, and guided the Ravens to a 13-3 record. But he injured his groin during the season opener in 2007 and never regained the form that put him in those Pro Bowls.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on July 06, 2009, 01:35:30 AM
damn son.  never pick up waitresses at Dave and Buster's. that's a life lesson.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on July 06, 2009, 02:21:39 AM
this was a comment on an updated story on my local newspaper's site.  It is complete.

Quote
So many love triangles Thank God I don't date married men not even if he is separated If I am a divorcee he must also be divorced with no baby momma drama and no excess baggage. Needs noone headaches have goals
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on July 06, 2009, 02:25:10 AM
woops! i'm gonna go crazy with this!

Quote
Believe it r not, women makes the world go round. she stands behind every proclaim goodman or better yet aside a even better man side. Where would you be if not for a woman bring u into the world.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on July 06, 2009, 02:26:33 AM
yes, i've already been a huge NFL quarterback...which has opened the door for me to open a restaurant and finally meet chicks!

Quote
I have to wonder if he opened the restaurant for motives other than profit. Young college girls are very tempting and plentiful near a college campus.
Passion can be uncontrollable. The question is "Whose passion was it that caused this tragedy."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on July 06, 2009, 02:28:33 AM
Quote
there are 4 things a woman should know they are,

1. HOW TO LOOK LIKE A GIRL
2. HOW TO ACT LIKE A LADY
3. HOW TO THINK LIKE A MAN
4. AND HOW TO WORK LIKE A DOG

THIS IS WHY I CAN'T GET PLAYED I DO RESEARCH

5. BE PREPARED, TRADE DAVE AND BUSTER'S CREDITS FOR GUNS.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on July 06, 2009, 02:30:16 AM
Quote
I would suspect this was a hit as the Iranian's don't play these types of games, there women dating married men.

Way to go player, she was pretty, but "YOU" were married. The Koran does not allow this type behavior.

Also, why you hatin' on Mousavi?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on July 06, 2009, 02:31:23 AM
Quote
Playa got played.

yep!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 06, 2009, 12:47:36 PM
Quote
Former Beatles, Stones manager Allen Klein dies
Sat Jul 4, 2009 4:34pm EDT

By Dean Goodman

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Infamous record label owner Allen Klein, who played a key role in the demise of the Beatles and also nabbed control of some of the Rolling Stones' best-known songs, died in New York on Saturday after a battle with Alzheimer's disease, a spokesman said. He was 77.

During a career spanning more than 50 years, the New Jersey-born accountant enjoyed a reputation as a savvy gangster-like figure. His ruthless business practices were reviled by many, but he also earned grudging respect for bullying labels into giving rich deals to his clients.

"Don't talk to me about ethics," he told Playboy magazine in 1971. "Every man makes his own. It's like a war. You choose your side early and from then on, you're being shot at. The man you beat is likely to call you unethical. So what?"

It did not hurt his reputation when he was sentenced to two months in prison in 1979 for tax evasion.

He once said John Lennon hired him to protect his interest in the Beatles because he and wife Yoko Ono wanted "a real shark -- someone to keep the other sharks away."

His company, ABKCO Music & Records, is one of the biggest independent labels in an industry controlled by multinational corporations. The spokesman said it would remain family-controlled. Two of Klein's three adult children work at the company, including son Jody who runs ABKCO. (The acronym stands for Allen and Betty Klein Co., Betty being his wife.)

Its assets include recordings by the Rolling Stones, the Animals, Herman's Hermits, Bobby Womack, the Kinks, Chubby Checker, Bobby Rydell and many others.

The publishing arm boasts more than 2,000 copyrights including compositions by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones, Cooke, Womack, Ray Davies of the Kinks and Pete Townshend of the Who.

SAM COOKE TO BEATLES

Klein broke into the music business by auditing record labels on behalf of clients including Bobby Darin and Connie Francis. When he found they were owed royalties, he took half of the difference as a fee.

His first big management client was Sam Cooke, for whom he negotiated a lucrative recording deal in 1963 that gave the soul star unprecedented control over his own catalog.

Klein, who was already representing "British Invasion" artists such as the Animals, Dave Clark Five and Herman's Hermits, set his sights on the Rolling Stones, who were laboring under an onerous deal.

He renegotiated their pact in 1965, and ended up managing the group for about five years -- taking a 20 percent fee.

The Stones eventually tired of Klein. But the only way to break free of him was to give up the rights to their master recordings and rights to such timeless tunes as "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" and "Jumpin' Jack Flash."

"In some ways Allen Klein was very much ahead of his time," Jagger said in the 1989 Stones documentary "25x5." "We lasted about three or four years with him, really, though the ramifications of that still continue to this day."

Richards was more philosophical, describing their experience with Klein as "the price of an education."

By then, Klein was focused on the ultimate prize, the Beatles. He offered his help to Lennon in early 1969, when the Fab Four's idealistic Apple Corps. label was fast draining the fractured group's coffers.

George Harrison and Ringo Starr also warmed to his pitch, but Paul McCartney was fiercely opposed. He preferred the expertise of his father-in-law, high-powered New York attorney Lee Eastman.

Amid a series of complex maneuverings that also have consequences to this day, Klein unsuccessfully tried to secure control of the Beatles' copyrights on behalf of the group. Michael Jackson ended up with the rights 16 years later.

Klein did score a rich recording deal for the Beatles, but relations within the group were past frayed, and it dissolved in 1970.

That year, Harrison "honored" Klein in a rough version of his song "Beware of Darkness" with the line "beware of ABKCO." "It might have ended up being prophetic. But at the time it was just a little joke," Harrison told Reuters in 2000.

Indeed, Harrison and Klein reunited in 1971 to put on the all-star Concert for Bangladesh shows at Madison Square Garden in New York. It took a decade for the funds to reach the refugees because of complex tax problems.

In addition to his children and wife, Klein is survived by his longtime girlfriend Iris Keitel, an ABKCO executive. His funeral will take place in New York on Tuesday.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 06, 2009, 01:38:19 PM
Quote
Robert McNamara, ex-defense secretary, dies

   
(CNN) -- Former U.S. Defense Secretary Robert McNamara, a key architect of the U.S. war in Vietnam under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, has died at age 93, according to his family.

McNamara was a member of Kennedy's inner circle during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, when the United States and the Soviet Union stood on the brink of nuclear war.

But he became a public lightning rod for his management of the war in Vietnam, overseeing the U.S. military commitment there as it grew from fewer than 1,000 advisers to more than half a million troops.

Though the increasingly unpopular conflict was sometimes dubbed "McNamara's War," he later said both administrations were "terribly wrong" to have pursued military action beyond 1963.

"External military force cannot reconstruct a failed state, and Vietnam, during much of that period, was a failed state politically," he told CNN in a 1996 interview for the "Cold War" documentary series. "We didn't recognize it as such."

A native of San Francisco, McNamara studied economics at the University of California and earned a master's degree in business from Harvard. He was a staff officer in the Army Air Corps during World War II, when he studied the results of American bombing raids on Germany and Japan in search of ways to improve their accuracy and efficiency.

After the war, he joined the Ford Motor Company and became its president in November 1960 -- the first person to lead the company from outside its founding family. A month later, the newly elected Kennedy asked him to become secretary of defense, making him one of the "whiz kids" who joined the young president's administration.

In October 1962, after the discovery of Soviet nuclear missiles in Cuba, McNamara was one of Kennedy's top advisers in the standoff that followed. The United States imposed a naval "quarantine" on Cuba, a Soviet ally, and prepared for possible airstrikes or an invasion. The Soviets withdrew the missiles in exchange for a U.S. guarantee not to invade Cuba, a step that allowed Soviet premier Nikita Kruschev to present the pullback as a success to his own people.

In the 2003 documentary "The Fog of War," McNamara told filmmaker Errol Morris that the experience taught American policymakers to "put ourselves inside their skin and look at us through their eyes." But he added, "In the end, we lucked out. It was luck that prevented nuclear war."

McNamara is credited with using the management techniques he mastered as a corporate executive to streamline the Pentagon, computerizing and smoothing out much of the U.S. military's vast purchasing and personnel system. And in Vietnam, he attempted to use those techniques to measure the progress of the war.

Metrics such as use of "body counts" and scientific solutions such as using the herbicide Agent Orange to defoliate jungles in which communist guerrillas hid became trademarks of the conflict. McNamara made several trips to South Vietnam to study the situation firsthand.

He, Johnson and other U.S. officials portrayed the war as a necessary battle in the Cold War, a proxy struggle to prevent communism from taking control of all of Southeast Asia. But while they saw the conflict as another front in the standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union, which backed communist North Vietnam, McNamara acknowledged later that they underestimated Vietnamese nationalism and opposition to the U.S.-backed government in Saigon.

"The conflict within South Vietnam itself had all of the characteristics of a civil war, and we didn't look upon it as largely a civil war, and we weren't measuring our progress as one would have in what was largely a civil war," he told CNN.

Casualties mounted, as did domestic opposition to the war. In 1965, a Quaker anti-war protester, Norman Morrison, set himself on fire outside McNamara's office window. In 1967, tens of thousands of demonstrators marched on the Pentagon, which was ringed with troops.

By November 1967, McNamara told Johnson that there was "no reasonable way" to end the war quickly, and that the United States needed to reduce its forces in Vietnam and turn the fighting over to the American-backed government in Saigon. By the end of that month, Johnson announced he was replacing McNamara at the Pentagon and moving him to the World Bank. But by March 1968, Johnson had reached virtually the same conclusion as McNamara. He issued a call for peace talks and announced he would not seek re-election.

After leaving the Pentagon in early 1968, McNamara spent 12 years leading the World Bank. He said little publicly about Vietnam until the publication of a 1995 memoir, "In Retrospect."

"You don't know what I know about how inflammatory my words can appear," he told Morris. "A lot of people misunderstand the war, misunderstand me. A lot of people think I'm a son of a bitch."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on July 06, 2009, 06:06:23 PM
Fog of War is still one of the best documentaries I've ever seen.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 07, 2009, 12:29:59 PM
Quote
French tennis player Mathieu Montcourt dies at 24

PARIS – French tennis player Mathieu Montcourt, who was recently banned for betting on matches, has died. He was 24.

The French tennis federation said Tuesday that Montcourt died overnight but the cause of death is not yet known, and an autopsy will be conducted.

French media reported the 119th-ranked Montcourt was found dead by his girlfriend in the stairwell of his Paris apartment. In May, Montcourt was handed a five-week ban and fined $12,000 for betting on other matches. That ban took effect Monday.

"It is with great sadness that the French tennis federation has learned of the sudden death of Mathieu Montcourt," the French tennis federation said. "Mathieu was an enthusiastic young man, passionate, very endearing, and extremely appreciated for his kindness and politeness."

Four-time French Open champion Rafael Nadal, who grew up playing against Montcourt on the junior circuit, said he was shocked by the news.

"This morning I woke up with one of the worst news anyone can receive," Nadal said on his Web site. "I heard about the death of our friend Mathieu Montcourt. I am still under shock for this. I can't believe it."

Montcourt complained during the French Open that the punishment was too harsh, saying that he never bet more than $3 at any time, and never on his own matches — a fact confirmed by the ATP, which oversees the men's Tour.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport said Montcourt had wagered a total of $192 on 36 tennis events in 2005. It reduced his suspension on appeal from eight weeks to five.

The issue of betting in tennis drew increased attention from the sport's governing bodies after an online bookmaker voided all wagers on a 2007 match involving Nikolay Davydenko. About $7 million was bet — 10 times the usual amount for a similar-level match — and most of the money backed Davydenko's lower-ranked opponent.

Davydenko was cleared in September after a yearlong investigation.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on July 08, 2009, 11:21:37 AM
That's crazy... I wonder if the death is gambling related.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 18, 2009, 02:40:11 AM
Quote
Newsman Walter Cronkite Dies

Man, I thought he died in the 80's...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on July 19, 2009, 01:09:46 PM
so, i'm 28, but i'm the youngest person who works in our store.  yesterday the owner (68) comes up to me while we're watching the cronkite stuff on CNN and goes "You don't even know who that is, do you!"  things like that happen all the time.   
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 20, 2009, 10:14:30 AM
Don't talk to me about Abraham Lincoln!  You never met him! 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 20, 2009, 06:52:56 PM
Quote
Very sad news. Frank McCourt, author of the memoirs Angela's Ashes, 'Tis and Teacher Man, died yesterday at 78 in New York City. He had suffered from metastatic melanoma, according to the New York Times, which has a long obituary and a remembrance called "A Storyteller Even as a Teacher."

Unfortunately, all I can think about is The Office.

"Okay, who was the central character in Angela's Ashes?"

"Angela?  No?  The...ashes?"
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 24, 2009, 05:11:48 PM
Quote
Who among us doesn't have at least one blue-and-yellow can sitting on the shelf near the tools? WD-40 and its secret formula has been often imitated, but the small San Diego firm long resisted the temptation to spread itself thin with too many other products. Under the leadership of one John S. Barry, the company took a single product - one that had taken 40 tries to get right - and built it into the Kleenex of lubricant products, good for $317 million in sales last year. The man who kept his focus firmly on making the best single product of its type has passed away at the age of 84.

John Barry's demeanor as the top dog of WD-40 Co. is an admirable example for fatcat CEOs that are so addicted to costly perks. Barry himself acknowledged that his style was that of "breaking all the Harvard Business School rules." He answered his own phone. He flew coach. Meetings were sometimes held at Denny's. The proof of Barry's keen instincts can be seen by the myriad of copycat products laid to waste by WD-40's dominance.

Despite the assertions that a single-product company would never make it, WD-40 is very much still around thanks to John Barry's refusal to tinker with his product and its ever-increasing list of unique uses. The company now has other highly regarded products in its porfolio, such as Spot Shot carpet cleaner, Lava soap, and 3-in-1 Oil - perhaps the only other lubricant that's nearly as universal and also has a delightfully distinct aroma, just like its blue and yellow shelfmate.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 30, 2009, 11:02:03 AM
Trying to plan a weekend trip, and I was debating retracing the steps I took in "American braves":
http://www.greatsociety.org/?p=184#more-184  (three parts before that)

The highlight of the trip, besides getting lost and desperate in the Maize Maze, was visiting the Corn Crib, which is this insane bar that no normal human being should ever go to.  It was a grand time.  But, in looking for directions, I ran across this sad news about the owner...


Quote
Ara Charles Artinian, 68 entrepreneur, magician, and bon vivant

Ara Charles ('Chuck') Artinian, son of Armenian immigrants Anna Saniossian Artinian and Charles Bajaksusian Artinian, died from complications connected to esophageal cancer Friday April 25 at his home in Cochranville, Pennsylvania.

Mr. Artinian, well known for his exuberant character, his skill as an entertainer and magician, and also his success in business, was born in Philadelphia and grew up in the Lansdowne section of the city. After graduating from Lansdowne High School in 1957, where he was captain of the football team, he earned a Batchelor of Science in Business Studies from Drexel University in 1962. There he was President of the fraternity Tau Kappa Epsilon, Master of Ceremonies at weekly Great Court rallies, and features editor of the university newspaper.

After completing his studies, Mr. Artinian's business acumen and love of meeting new people, exploring new places, and facing new challenges took him across the country. For ten years he worked as distribution and marketing manager for two national corporations in California, Minnesota, Georgia and Pennsylvania. During this time he was Charter President and founder of the Stone Mountain Industrial Park Management Association in Georgia.

From 1968 onwards, Mr. Artinian lived in Chester and Lancaster Counties in Pennsylvania, working first for the Green Giant corporation, then for Hayes Real Estate and finally for himself, founding his own brokerage company, ARA Real Estate, and later also the real estate holding company ARA Consulting Ltd. Close colleague Gary ('the cowboy') Stapleton remembers his business drive and creativity: 'Chuck never failed to remind me that the man who said 'it couldn't be done' should never interrupt the cowboy and magician - who were already doing it.'

During this time he served in a number of public offices, including: President of the Octorara Rotary Club, Vice Chairman and Board Member of Central and Western Chester County Industrial Development Corporation, Borough Councilman of Christiana Borough ? Lancaster County, Township Supervisor of West Sadsbury Township - Chester County, and Vice Chairman and Board Member of the Municipal Authority Sadsbury Township - Lancaster County. He also served on the Fulton Bank Advisory Board for Gap, PA for over eleven years.

Beyond his achievements in business and local government, perhaps Mr. Artinian was best known for his gregarious character and love of life, connected to which was his much esteemed talent as a magician and entertainer. In 1977 he opened the Corn Crib Restaurant in Christiana, PA, where he became known as The Great Zucchini for his impromptu tableside magic, something he later always took with him to places near and far - performing tricks spontaneously everywhere from corner pubs in London, to real estate settlement meetings, to the Paris metro.

In keeping with his sharp sense of humor, part wit and part irreverence, Mr. Artinian authored the book Rhyme and Punishment, a collection of his locally inspired puns and insights. He was also well known for his sartorial creativity, rarely seen without his bowler hat and mutton chops, which he began sporting after an appearance as a movie extra in the film Beloved.

With his compassion and concern for others, he had a deep influence on many around him, particularly younger people. Danny Walker, son of longtime business partner Don Walker, says, ' His humor and outlook have had a big impact on me. It's also occurred to me that he's probably never taught anyone all those amazing magic tricks. Just how is that dice trick done?'

Mr. Artinian recently achieved a long held goal by visiting his ancestral homeland, traveling to Armenia (his parents originated from Malatya in Eastern Anatolia) and visiting Etchmiadzin, the holy see of the Armenian Orthodox Church. He was a lifelong member of the congregation of St Gregory's Armenian Apostolic Church in Philadelphia.

Mr. Artinian was predeceased by his younger sister, Betty Ann Artinian. He is survived by wife Marian Artinian, daughter Emily Artinian-Smith and her mother Jane Artinian, nephew Paul Karabashian, and the Bajakesian family in France.

A memorial service will be held at 11:00 am on Saturday May 3, 2008 at Manor Presbyterian Church, 505 Street Road, Cochranville, PA. 19330. Visitation with the family will be held from 9:00-11:00 am.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to St Gregory the Illuminator Armenian Apostolic Church, 8701 Ridge Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19128, Faith Bible Chapel, Wesley Acres, Cochranville, PA 19330, or Manor Presbyterian Church at the above address.

Arrangements by the Wilde Funeral Home, Parkesburg, PA 610-857-5551.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 06, 2009, 09:39:18 PM
This guy defined my teenage years. Sad.

Quote
'80s teen flick director John Hughes dies in NYC

NEW YORK - Writer-director John Hughes, Hollywood's youth impresario of the 1980s and '90s who captured and cornered the teen and pre-teen market with such favorites as "Home Alone," "The Breakfast Club" and "Ferris Bueller's Day Off," died Thursday, a spokeswoman said. He was 59.

Hughes died of a heart attack during a morning walk in Manhattan, Michelle Bega said. He was in New York to visit family.

A native of Lansing, Mich., who later moved to suburban Chicago and set much of his work there, Hughes rose from ad writer to comedy writer to silver screen champ with his affectionate and idealized portraits of teens, whether the romantic and sexual insecurity of "Sixteen Candles," or the J.D. Salinger-esque rebellion against conformity in "The Breakfast Club."

Hughes' ensemble comedies helped make stars out of Molly Ringwald, Anthony Michael Hall, Ally Sheedy and many other young performers. He also scripted the phenomenally popular "Home Alone," which made little-known Macaulay Culkin a sensation as the 8-year-old accidentally abandoned by his vacationing family, and wrote or directed such hits as "National Lampoon's Vacation," "Pretty in Pink," "Planes, Trains & Automobiles" and "Uncle Buck."

Other actors who got early breaks from Hughes included John Cusack ("Sixteen Candles"), Judd Nelson ("The Breakfast Club"), Steve Carrell ("Curly Sue") and Lili Taylor ("She's Having a Baby").

As Hughes advanced into middle age, his commercial touch faded and, in Salinger style, he increasingly withdrew from public life. His last directing credit was in 1991, for "Curly Sue," and he wrote just a handful of scripts over the past decade. He was rarely interviewed or photographed.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 06, 2009, 10:07:59 PM
Jesus...that's terrible.  He defined my 80's as well.  That's heartbreaking...so young, too.  Man.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 06, 2009, 10:46:24 PM
So now downloading the Hughes classics....going to have a Saturday orgy, I think.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on August 07, 2009, 02:34:39 AM
so, i'm sad about that, but the man also did "Baby's Day Out" and all the Beethoven movies.  Yes, parts 1-5. 

also, "JD Salinger-esque rebellion against conformity"?  Catcher in the Rye is not about fucking rebelling against anything!  Jesus!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 07, 2009, 08:20:26 AM
Hughes fell from the grace of God after Uncle Buck.  Maybe you could argue for Christmas Vacation, but that was the beginning of the end.  Then he did Home Alone, and he was corrupted like Spielberg and Lucas.  Everything after Home Alone is either more kiddie trash like that, a sequel, or a ham-fisted attempt to desperately recapture the 80's, and all largely Disney-funded.

For me, the real John Hughes died in 1989.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on August 07, 2009, 08:33:55 PM
Pitchman Mays was apparently a victim of just a tad too much DD....
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 12, 2009, 03:15:20 PM
Molly Ringwald's lovely op-ed to the NYT:


Quote
The Neverland Club
By MOLLY RINGWALD

IN life, there is always that special person who shapes who you are, who helps to determine the person you become. Very often it’s a teacher, a mentor of some kind. For me, that person was John Hughes. Along with the rest of the world, I was stunned when I learned that he had died of a heart attack last week at 59.

Not long after hearing the horrible news, I found myself talking on the phone to Anthony Michael Hall, my friend and co-star in several of the movies John directed. His experiences mirror mine to a large extent. Both of us were catapulted from obscurity and planted in the American consciousness through the films that we did with John. Michael, as he prefers to be called, will be forever associated with “geekdom” just as I will always be the girl whose 16th birthday is forgotten. But for both of us, what really matters is less the mark that these films left on the world than the experience of making them with John, the mark it made on us.

We stayed on the phone for a while reminiscing about our old friend and mentor. Since the days of John’s death, we have both been inundated with missives from friends and acquaintances, sending us their condolences the way you would for a close family member. Yet the strange thing is, neither of us had talked to John in more than 20 years.

Most everyone knows that John retreated from Hollywood and became a sort of J.D. Salinger for Generation X. But really, sometime before then, he had retreated from us and from the kinds of movies that he had made with us. I still believe that the Hughes films of which both Michael and I were a part (specifically “Sixteen Candles” and “The Breakfast Club”) were the most deeply personal expressions of John’s. In retrospect, I feel that we were sort of avatars for him, acting out the different parts of his life — improving upon it, perhaps. In those movies, he always got the last word. He always got the girl.

None of the films that he made subsequently had the same kind of personal feeling to me. They were funny, yes, wildly successful, to be sure, but I recognized very little of the John I knew in them, of his youthful, urgent, unmistakable vulnerability. It was like his heart had closed, or at least was no longer open for public view. A darker spin can be gleaned from the words John put into the mouth of Allison in “The Breakfast Club”: “When you grow up ... your heart dies.”

I’m speaking metaphorically, of course. Though it does seem sadly poignant that physically, at least, John’s heart really did die. It also seems undeniably meaningful: His was a heavy heart, deeply sensitive, prone to injury — easily broken.

Most people who knew John knew that he was able to hold a grudge longer than anyone — his grudges were almost supernatural things, enduring for years, even decades. Michael suspects that he was never forgiven for turning down parts in “Pretty in Pink” and “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.” I turned down later films as well. Not because I didn’t want to work with John anymore — I loved working with him, more than anyone before or since.

John saw something in me that I didn’t even see in myself. He had complete confidence in me as an actor, which was an extraordinary and heady sensation for anyone, let alone a 16-year-old girl. I did some of my best work with him. How could I not? He continually told me that I was the best, and because of my undying respect for him and his judgment, how could I have not believed him?

Eventually, though, I felt that I needed to work with other people as well. I wanted to grow up, something I felt (rightly or wrongly) I couldn’t do while working with John. Sometimes I wonder if that was what he found so unforgivable. We were like the Darling children when they made the decision to leave Neverland. And John was Peter Pan, warning us that if we left we could never come back. And, true to his word, not only were we unable to return, but he went one step further. He did away with Neverland itself.

“I just remember how fun it all was,” Michael said on the phone.

It was: the concerts he took us to (the blues great Junior Wells at Kingston Mines in Chicago), the endless mixed tapes he made for us and, most of all, the work itself. It doesn’t even seem like you should be able to call it “work” because we enjoyed it so much.

There’s a scene in “Sixteen Candles” where my character, Samantha, and Michael’s character, “the geek,” have a heart-to-heart talk. The scene lasts all of six minutes, but it took us days to film because we were all laughing too hard. John, too. He sat under the camera — his permanent place before directors retreated to the video monitor — while the assistant directors stood around rolling their eyes waiting for him to stop laughing and reprimand “the kids.” But how could he? He was one of us.

About 15 years ago, I wrote John from Paris, where I was living, to tell him how important he was to me. I had been on a François Truffaut kick and had just watched the series of “Antoine Doinel” films that he had made with the actor Jean-Pierre Léaud. There was something in the connection of actor and director that I recognized in us, particularly in the first film of the series, “400 Blows.”

After Truffaut died, I heard that Jean-Pierre Léaud had suffered a kind of breakdown, going so far as to drop flower pots on people from high-storied buildings. This is most likely a rumor, French film lore, but I think I now understand how painful it is to lose someone like that. John was my Truffaut. A week after I sent my letter, I received a bouquet of flowers as big as my apartment from John, thanking me for writing. I was so relieved to know that I had gotten through to him, and I feel grateful now for that sense of closure.

Toward the end of my phone call with Michael, we spent a little time catching up on mutual friends and family. I told him that my 5-year-old daughter, Mathilda, had just secured the part that she wanted in her theater camp — Tiger Lily, the Indian princess in “Peter Pan.” Michael made me promise to invite him to Mathilda’s debut as a fellow thespian. So in a few weeks we’ll drive to the theater and spend a couple of hours with Tiger Lily, Peter, Wendy and the Lost Boys.

Turns out, you can return to Neverland. At least for a little while.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on August 13, 2009, 02:31:04 PM
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jBD78k8tewQ7FPeiKtJbK8QPmtzAD9A24BBO2

Quote
Guitar legend-inventor Les Paul dies at age 94

By LUKE SHERIDAN (AP) – 33 minutes ago

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — Les Paul, who invented the solid-body electric guitar later wielded by a legion of rock 'n' roll greats, died Thursday of complications from pneumonia. He was 94.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 13, 2009, 03:45:33 PM
Wow. Talk about an icon . . . though I did think he was already dead.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on August 18, 2009, 03:55:54 PM
Robert Novak! 


The End.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 26, 2009, 09:14:48 AM
Exeunt Ted Kennedy . . .
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 26, 2009, 10:12:11 AM
Been waiting for it to happen since 76!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 26, 2009, 10:21:26 AM
Also, RIP Mary Kopechne.  Heh...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Jo_Kopechne
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 26, 2009, 07:24:42 PM
Quote
Crime story author Dominick Dunne, 83, dies in NYC
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 26, 2009, 07:56:13 PM
Big day!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 11, 2009, 03:52:13 PM
Quote
World's oldest person dies in California at 115

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The world's oldest person, a woman who was born in 1894 and gained a measure of fame when she voted for Barack Obama for U.S. president, died on Friday at the age of 115.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 11, 2009, 04:15:18 PM
My grandma is 99 today.  Go for the record gran!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 14, 2009, 09:26:08 PM
Patrick Swayze!

It's either my way...or the cancer way!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 14, 2009, 09:27:31 PM
"Nobody puts Baby in a corner!"

Confession: My sister and I spent one summer watching both Dirty Dancing (and Top Gun) almost every other day.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 14, 2009, 09:34:08 PM
Yeah, I sort of want to load up some Swayze favorites now...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 14, 2009, 10:50:17 PM
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xu9mx_patrick-swayze-chippendale_dating
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 14, 2009, 10:55:37 PM
Quote
On 1 June 2000, actor Patrick Swayze escaped injury after he made an emergency landing in a housing development in Prescott Valley, AZ. He had been en route from Van Nuys, CA to Las Vegas, NM when his aircraft apparently had a pressurization problem at about 13,000 feet. The following synopsis is taken from the NTSB report on the accident.

NTSB Identification: LAX00FA213
Date:1 June 2000
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
Aircraft: Cessna 414A, registration: N414PS

On June 1, 2000, about 1005 hours mountain standard time, the aircraft experienced a suspected pressurization malfunction during cruise flight. The pilot made a precautionary landing on a road in a housing development under construction near Prescott Valley, Arizona. During rollout, the aircraft collided with obstructions and sustained substantial damage; however, the pilot (Swayze) and his two dogs were not injured.

The pilot reported that he was in cruise flight at 13,000 feet msl when he heard a loud sound. His ears "popped" and his dogs began barking. Concerned that he had lost pressurization, he looked for a suitable landing site. After seeing what he believed was an airport below him, he circled the field to the left and initiated an approach from the west. On short final, he noticed a truck parked on the left side of what he believed was a runway near the approach end and lengthened his approach, clearing the vehicle by about four or five feet.

Just prior to touchdown, the right wing of the aircraft struck a streetlight, losing about a 4-foot outboard section of the right wing. The aircraft then touched down, bounced, and touched down again, crossing an intersection, striking a stop sign and another streetlight. The aircraft then began veering right off the paved portion of the roadway, striking an electrical utility box with outboard section of the extended left flap. The aircraft came to a stop, facing south, about 200 yards from the impact point.

The Safety Board investigator who examined the aircraft found that a clamp on a hose connecting the plenum chamber to the upper plenum had separated. The representatives from Honeywell and Cessna opined that the absence of the clamp could have prevented the pressurization system from maintaining the desired cabin pressure.

The pilot reported to investigators that he smoked about three packs of cigarettes per day. The aircraft cabin had a strong tobacco odor. The door seal, outflow valve, and safety valve exhibited dark brown tar-like deposits.

The NTSB concluded that the pilot's physical impairment due to the cumulative effects of carbon monoxide from engine exhaust by-products, carbon monoxide from heavy tobacco use, and the loss of an undetermined amount of cabin pressurization. A factor in the loss of pressurization was a fractured clamp.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on September 15, 2009, 01:35:27 AM
oh man.  i was just down at 45 Tchoup and they were having the Monday night pub quiz and one of the team's names was "Nobody Puts Baby in a Casket."  now i get it.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 16, 2009, 05:40:45 PM
(http://i32.tinypic.com/f9jqeu.jpg)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 17, 2009, 10:51:20 AM
Henry Gibson!  What a creepy fuck!  I'll miss him dearly.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on September 17, 2009, 09:38:49 PM
and mary travers!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 17, 2009, 11:18:35 PM
All the leaves are brown.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Poppy Propercock on September 18, 2009, 09:51:38 AM
All the leaves are brown.

You thinking of Michelle Phillips?

His head was bent in sorrow, green scales fell like rain,
Puff no longer went to play along the cherry lane.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 18, 2009, 10:14:34 AM
Oh! You're right!  I confused my identical saccharine folk 60's vocal groups!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on September 18, 2009, 11:38:29 AM
Oh! You're right!  I confused my identical saccharine folk 60's vocal groups!

haha!

nostalgia engine kicks in and everyone will gloss over the fact that Peter, Paul, and Mary were a manufactured folk product.....just like twilight!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 18, 2009, 11:49:33 AM
Peter, Paul and Zzzz
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 25, 2009, 01:35:25 PM
Swamp Thing died:

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​Actor and stuntman Dick Durock -- best known as Swamp Thing in both movies and the TV series -- passed away on September 17th after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. From the South Bend Tribune:[Dick's older sister Judy] Schenk said her brother never expressed an interest in acting or stunt work, but she was never surprised by his chosen profession. He was always handsome, she said, and at 6 feet 5 inches tall and about 225 pounds, he had the physique to withstand the physical abuses inflicted upon stunt professionals.He also had an amazing drive, his brother-in-law said."He was single-minded," Frank Varrichione said, "and when he went after and pursued something, he expected success."Dick Durock's early work included stunts for "The Beverly Hillbillies" and a bit part as "Guard #1" in an episode of "Star Trek." He would go on to do stunt work in hundreds of films and television shows, including "The Poseidon Adventure" and "A-Team," and act in hundreds more, including "The Rockford Files," "The Incredible Hulk," "Married with Children" and "Stand by Me." But Dick Durock's most memorable work was as the DC Comics character Swamp Thing, a plant-like humanoid charged with protecting the natural world from the abuses of man.He played the character in two feature films, "Swamp Thing" (1982) and "The Return of Swamp Thing" (1989), and in a subsequent television series, also called "Swamp Thing," that ran for 71 episodes in the early 1990s.Dick Durock was practically unrecognizable in the physically taxing role, which required him to don a heavy body suit and endure hours of makeup."At the end of the day you're wearing 80 pounds of wet latex," Dick Durock said in a 2008 interview for the Web site Mania.com, "plus all the chemicals on your face. It sure isn't sunglasses and autographs, I'll tell ya."But he enjoyed the work, Schenk said. "He loved it," she said. "He loved doing those crazy things."Man, I feel extra bad this happened on the 17th and I didn't know until today. Anyone who epitomizes a cult role like that deserves more notice, and certainly, Dick Durock was Swamp Thing. Rest in peace, sir.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 27, 2009, 11:18:58 PM
http://www.gadling.com/2009/09/26/last-ottoman-dies-but-the-civilization-endures/

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It was only a blip on the world news last week, but historians will remember it as the end of an era. Ertugrul Osman, the last heir to the throne of the Ottoman Empire, has died at the age of 97.

He was the last grandson of Sultan Abdul-Hamid II, and would have become Sultan himself if the caliphate hadn't been abolished in 1922 as the remnants of the Ottoman Empire remade itself into the Republic of Turkey following defeat in World War One.

Osman reportedly never wanted to be Sultan, but if the empire survived he would have ruled over a civilization of great artistic achievements. The Ottomans may be a thing of the past but you can still enjoy Ottoman art, especially the architecture that graces all parts of the former empire, which once stretched west from Istanbul almost to Vienna, and south across the Middle East to Yemen and west into North Africa.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 28, 2009, 01:08:44 PM
I'm on the crackberry, so I can't post a link to the obit, but Susan "Sadie Mae Glutz" Atkins died.

Bummer about Swamp Thing too.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 28, 2009, 01:17:59 PM
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I don't know how many times I stabbed [Tate] and I don't know why I stabbed her ... She kept begging and pleading and begging and pleading and I got sick of listening to it, so I stabbed her.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 28, 2009, 03:04:19 PM
A day of death for Beatles-related people.  The Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds girl died.




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The Lucy referred to in the song was a classmate of Julian's at Heath House School named Lucy O'Donnell, born in Weybridge in 1963.[9] Her married name was Lucy Vodden.[6]

In 2009, Julian Lennon learned that Vodden, who lives in Surrey, England, suffered from lupus. Lennon sent her flowers with a personally written card.[1] After learning that Vodden was taking solace from gardening and looking at plants, Lennon sent her gift vouchers for a garden centre. Vodden, who saw Lennon in the intervening years one time at a concert of his, reacted by saying, "It was lovely of Julian."[6][8] Vodden's death at the age of 46 of the immune system disease Lupus on September 22, was announced by St Thomas' Hospital on September 28, 2009.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 28, 2009, 03:07:14 PM
Oh, man, and William Safire died yesterday. 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 28, 2009, 03:11:30 PM
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I don't know how many times I stabbed [Tate] and I don't know why I stabbed her ... She kept begging and pleading and begging and pleading and I got sick of listening to it, so I stabbed her.

Also, Roman Polanski was arrested this weekend... he may be extradited back to the US to face charges of drugging/raping a 13 year-old girl in 1978.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on September 28, 2009, 03:57:22 PM
From what I've read about the Polanski thing, the girl (now 44 with a family and children) is in favor of dropping the whole thing.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 28, 2009, 04:21:47 PM
Yeah, sounds to me like everyone is.  Anjelica Houston says that the girl looked 25.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 08, 2009, 01:14:34 PM
Oh wow... Ben of Ben's Chili Bowl has died.  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben%27s_Chili_Bowl

http://www.benschilibowl.com/ordereze/default.aspx
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on October 08, 2009, 01:38:48 PM
How's the food?  I would eat there every day.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 08, 2009, 01:50:49 PM
It's awesome.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on October 08, 2009, 02:09:30 PM
Mmm...greasy chili dogs.

Agree with Nacho, but you could not eat there everyday and live for more than a couple weeks.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 08, 2009, 02:15:18 PM
Man, the external links on Wikipedia are fun:

http://www.washingtonian.com/articles/people/7080.html

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1000430
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 16, 2009, 01:28:39 PM
Oh no!  The Equalizer died!


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Woodward was that rarity in the entertainment world: one who specialised in nothing much, yet appeared to be especially talented in whatever he took on: villains, heroes, characters from melodrama and the musical comedy stage – all were tackled with a superb professionalism.

To his portrayal of the cynical secret service agent Callan, he brought an authentic seediness; while his majestic portrayal of the avenging Robert McCall, the upright figure in the long overcoat in The Equalizer, turned him into an unlikely cult figure in the United States.

Supposed to be television's answer to James Bond on the big screen, Callan was broadcast by ITV from 1967 to 1972. Woodward's eponymous hero cut a lonely and unglamorous figure. While Bond moved in a world of gadgetry, fantasy and sex, Callan's universe was that of an outsider whose life as a professional killer was solitary and bleak.

In 1970 Woodward won a Bafta award for best actor for his role in Callan. But he became so closely identified with the part that when the series ended after six years, he had a job to find work in the theatre. In 1974 he starred in a feature film about Callan.

The Equalizer was shown on ITV from 1986 to 1989, with Woodward as a former secret service agent for "The Company" (the CIA) who had turned to working as a private investigator. He dressed immaculately, drove a Jaguar and carried a gun; unusually in this genre, the hero was on the wrong side of 50 years old. While making the series he worked 18-hour days, subsisting on a daily diet of junk food and 100 cigarettes (on his return to England he was to suffer a heart attack).

Set in Manhattan, the series was particularly popular in the United States: he won a Golden Globe award for best actor in a dramatic television series in 1987, and was nominated five times for an Emmy.

In 1990 Woodward starred in an American television series called Over My Dead Body, in which he played a mystery writer solving real crimes. Although it proved to be short-lived, it led the following year to his much more successful ITV true crime drama documentary series In Suspicious Circumstances, in which he guided viewers through some of the most celebrated British crimes of the 20th century.

Edward Albert Arthur Woodward was born in Croydon on June 1 1930, the only child of a factory worker, and educated at Kingston College. He made his stage debut aged five in a talent contest. His initial ambition was to become a journalist, but he settled for working briefly in a sanitary engineer's office. When he was only 16 he managed to gain a place at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. After making his first professional appearance at the Castle Theatre, Farnham, in 1946, he attracted a loyal following of admirers during his years with the Croydon Repertory Company.

Following wide experience touring throughout England and Scotland, and a tour of India and Ceylon in Shakespeare and Shaw, Woodward arrived in London in 1955 with Where There's a Will at the Garrick. There followed small parts in the musical A Girl Called Jo (Piccadilly) and Doctor in the House (Victoria Palace).

After good reviews for his role as Owen Tudor in Rosemary Anne Sisson's The Queen and the Welshman (Edinburgh Festival and Lyric Hammersmith, 1957), and stints in the musical Salad Days and in West End revue, Woodward joined the Memorial Theatre Company at Stratford-on-Avon, for which his roles included Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet, Laertes to Michael Redgrave's Hamlet, and Claudio in Much Ado About Nothing.

Back in the West End, Woodward had one of his greatest successes in Charles Dyer's study of loneliness, Rattle of a Simple Man, which he had directed in South Africa before it reached London. He played the part of the shy and gentle Mancunian Percy, a timid but imaginative north-country football fan who, for a bet, spent the night with a London prostitute (Sheila Hancock).

When the play reached Broadway in 1963, Noël Coward, who was preparing a musical version of his own wartime success Blithe Spirit, found Woodward's acting "marvellous" and cast him as the husband, Charles Condomine, in High Spirits. After the latter play had its Broadway opening, Coward described Woodward in his diary: "One of the nicest and most co-operative actors I have ever met or worked with. He is the only one who has given me no trouble at all."

On his return to England Woodward appeared in Henry James's The High Bid at the Mermaid, while his Sydney Carton in Two Cities (Palace, 1969) won the Variety award for best performer in a musical. Then came a stint at Olivier's National Theatre as Flamineo in Webster's The White Devil and as Cyrano de Bergerac at the Old Vic in 1970.

Other London stage credits included Robin Hood in Babes in the Wood (Palladium, 1972); George Szabo, the monocled lover of Judi Dench, in Molnar's The Wolf (Oxford Playhouse, Queen's and New London, 1974); and the Duke of Bristol in Lonsdale's On Approval (Haymarket, 1975).

In 1980 Woodward co-directed and played in a tour of The Beggar's Opera (Birmingham Rep, 1979), and at the Ludlow Festival he won wide praise as Richard III – The Daily Telegraph's critic hailing his "emotional complexities and psychological depths".

Other stage credits included Private Lives (Australia, 1980), The Assassin (Greenwich, 1982) and The Dead Secret (Plymouth and Richmond, 1992).

Woodward appeared in more than 2,000 parts in television productions. They included Guy Crouchbank in the Evelyn Waugh trilogy Sword of Honour; Cassius in Julius Caesar; Lopakin in The Cherry Orchard; Sir Samuel Hoare in Churchill: The Wilderness Years; and a binman in the BBC drama Common As Muck.

In March this year he joined the long-running BBC soap opera EastEnders, playing the character of Tommy Clifford.

Meanwhile, in the cinema Woodward gave a notably moving performance in the title role of Breaker Morant (1980), the Australian film about a shocking injustice in the Boer War. On the big screen he also played Sergeant Neil Howie, alongside Christopher Lee and Diane Cilento, in The Wicker Man (1973); Commander Powell in Who Dares Wins (1982); Saul in King David; the Ghost of Christmas Present in A Christmas Carol; Merlin in Merlin and the Sword; Captain Haldane in The Young Winston; the racehorse trainer Josh Gifford in Champions; and Sergeant Wellbeloved in Stand Up Virgin Soldiers. Earlier this year, despite suffering from ill health, he starred as the Rev Frederick Densham in A Congregation of Ghosts.

Woodward had a fine tenor voice, appearing on a number of occasions in The Good Old Days and making a dozen LPs. He also recorded three albums of poetry, capitalising on the reputation he had forged at Stratford as a lyrical speaker of verse.

He was appointed OBE in 1978.

In 1996 Woodward underwent triple heart bypass surgery, and in 2003 he was diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Edward Woodward married first, in 1952, Venetia Mary Collett, with whom he had two sons and a daughter, all of whom became successful actors. The marriage was dissolved in 1986, and he married secondly, in 1987, Michele Dotrice, daughter of the actor Roy Dotrice and best known for her role as Betty Spencer in Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em; they had a daughter.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 18, 2009, 02:46:47 PM
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Dan O'Bannon, the sci-fi and horror screenwriter behind some of the genres' most recognisable titles, has died in Los Angeles following a short illness. He was 63.

A USC graduate in the same year as John Carpenter, O'Bannon was instrumental in Carpenter's cracking (and crackpot) first feature Dark Star, serving as co-writer, FX supervisor, production designer and editor, and playing Sgt Pinback (who turns out not to be Sgt Pinback at all). O'Bannon is the one who chases the beachball alien all over the spaceship; an idea that would sort of resurface later...

O'Bannon did some FX work on Star Wars in 1977, but is best known for kickstarting a different franchise. While authorship of Alien as we know it today is down to a number of people, there's no question that O'Bannon's Star Beast screenplay set the ball rolling, and he brought many of his colleagues from Alejandro Jodorowsky's aborted Dune to the project. The rest is movie history.

He wrote Blue Thunder and Life Force, and had two cracks at Philip K Dick, adapting We Can Remember It For You Wholesale and Second Variety into Total Recall and Screamers. Some say his Moebius-illustrated Heavy Metal comic The Long Tomorrow was a big visual influence on Blade Runner.

His Soft Landing and B-17 segments of the 1981 Heavy Metal movie were well-received, And he directed twice, fronting the fondly-remembered George Romero knock-off/parody Return of the Living Dead in 1985, and The Resurrected in 1992: an adaptation of HP Lovecraft's The Case of Charles Dexter Ward.

His screenplays were often reworked, much to his chagrin (particularly Blue Thunder, which lost most of its politics) but his legacy is without doubt. Just like Pinback, he had something of value to contribute to this mission.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 18, 2009, 03:18:53 PM
Holy shit...I thought it was the Farscape creator and was about to flip out since the big ass boxset arrived yesterday.

Still, though...sad, sad.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 18, 2009, 03:26:50 PM
I'm a fan of lots of his stuff.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 20, 2009, 05:33:51 PM
Cardiac arrest. In the picture with the article, she looks like a fucking corpse.

http://omg.yahoo.com/news/coroner-brittany-murphy-dead-at-32/32963?nc (http://omg.yahoo.com/news/coroner-brittany-murphy-dead-at-32/32963?nc)

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Brittany Murphy Dead At 32

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- Brittany Murphy died on Sunday morning, a spokesperson for the Los Angeles County Coroner's Office has confirmed to Access Hollywood. She was 32.

According to the Coroner's Office, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Hollywood reported to them that an individual named Brittany Murphy died in the hospital on Sunday.

A Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman told Access that they responded to a 911 call made from the 1800 block of N. Rising Glen Road -- the same street where the actress lives -- at 8 AM on Sunday. According to TMZ, the actress was pronounced dead upon arrival at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

A rep for the actress also confirmed the news, telling Access Hollywood, "In this time of sadness, the family thanks you for your love and support. It is their wish that you respect their privacy."

Just weeks ago, a smiling Brittany spoke with Access at the Tt Collection Pop-Up Party in LA on December 3, where she discussed her hopes for the coming year.

"As far as having a New Year's resolution, I'd love to have a child next year," she said at the time. "But that's kind of a large one!"

The actress also spoke of her love for her family, whom she said she was very close to.

"I've been very blessed to have a really great loving husband," she said. "I spend more time with my family than anyone else in the world"

Brittany rose to fame after a memorable role in 1995's "Clueless." She went on to star in such films as "8 Mile," "Just Married," "Girl, Interrupted," "Sin City" and "Riding In Cars With Boys," among others.

She also made a splash in the music world with the track "Faster Kill Pussycat," with Paul Oakenfold in 2006 - the track topped the Billboard Hot Dance Club Play Chart that year. She also sang a pair of songs for the animated film "Happy Feet," in which she was also a voice actress.

Brittany was married to screenwriter Simon Monjack, whom she wed in May 2007.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on December 20, 2009, 05:59:54 PM
Just heard about this... unbelievable.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Matt on December 20, 2009, 06:27:34 PM
So what's the wager: heroin or cocaine?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 20, 2009, 06:29:28 PM
Judging from that December 1 picture, I'm not going to be too surprised if it was brought on by anorexia. Isn't that how Karen Carpenter died?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Tatertots on December 20, 2009, 08:14:33 PM
Or a combo of both. That's my guess.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on December 20, 2009, 11:54:59 PM
Judging from that December 1 picture, I'm not going to be too surprised if it was brought on by anorexia. Isn't that how Karen Carpenter died?

And Terry Schiavo... sort of.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Matt on December 21, 2009, 01:24:38 AM
I'm guessing heroin (inhaled), Tyson's going with cocaine and heroin combined, RC is going with anorexia, which is a good guess if the article hadn't mentioned she was kicked off a set for being "problematic", so RC you get a chance to change your wager.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Tatertots on December 21, 2009, 02:32:41 AM
Actually, I was going with hard drugs combined with anorexia or bulimia. Basically eating disorder + hard drugs. That's my wager.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 21, 2009, 09:19:44 AM
My money's with Tyson's bet.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on December 22, 2009, 08:41:58 AM
The Ramen Girl was another fab (though not commercially so) flick of hers, though not necessarily for someone who has never lived and worked in the Orient.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 24, 2009, 03:24:09 PM
This one's local, but pretty big for us Metro DC folks.

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Washington sportscasting legend George Michael has died from cancer, according to NBC4 News Washington, his former employer.

He was the station's sports anchor from the early 1980s until 2007, when he left the station amid cutbacks.

"George Michael was our friend and colleague for more than 25 years," a station spokesman said Thursday morning. "He was a dynamic force around our newsroom and in the entire Washington area."

Michael reportedly was 70.

Mr. Michael also hosted the popular "George Michael Sports Machine" show, on which he, former pro athletes and reporters held spirited discussions about the Redskins and other area sports teams.

"George was a pioneer in sports broadcasting," the spokesman also said. "He was a gifted interviewer, a master storyteller and one of the hardest-working journalists out there. Our hearts go out to his wife, Pat, and his daughter, Michelle, both of whom also worked with us for many years, as well as the rest of his family."

Redskins owner Daniel Snyder called Michael "the consummate reporter and a valuable friend."

"I doubt we'll ever again see a sports reporter who was so admired by the people he covered," Mr. Snyder said. "He loved his family, he loved sports, and he loved his work. His wife, Pat, and the rest of his family are in my prayers, and in the thoughts of the entire Redskins organization."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 24, 2009, 09:31:02 PM
Oh, man.  A big DC name.  I hated sports, but he was still a nightly fixture.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 25, 2009, 10:24:28 AM
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Earlier today, Spinner sadly reported that well-loved and respected singer-songwriter Vic Chesnutt was in a coma, following what was largely believed to be a suicide attempt. Sources now confirm that Chesnutt has passed away at the age of 45. San Francisco's Examiner, reports that Chesnutt was proclaimed dead just hours after slipping into a coma.

Entrenched in the Athens, Ga. music scene, Chesnutt was a songwriter's songwriter; he first earned the admiration of R.E.M.'s Michael Stipe in the late '80s and since then was praised by countless other notable songwriters and musicians, many of which eventually collaborated with him. His most recent band included members of Fugazi, Godspeed! You Black Emperor and Silver Mt. Zion Orchestra, but over the years he collaborated with members of Widespread Panic, Cracker, Lambchop, Throwing Muses, M. Ward, Cowboy Junkies and many more.

Chesnutt's national profile was elevated in 1996 when his songs were covered by an impressive list of contributors -- including Madonna, R.E.M., Smashing Pumpkins and Garbage -- for a Sweet Relief compilation album that benefited musicians without health insurance. Ironically and tragically, Chesnutt had health insurance and wasn't personally eligible for financial help from Sweet Relief, despite struggling to cover his significant health care costs. A car accident at the age of 18 left Chesnutt in a wheelchair, with a lifetime of complications.

He told Spinner earlier this year that "right now, I am in huge trouble in that the hospital is suing me for $35,000 for payment, which is terrifying -- and the rub is that I have health insurance." His heath care debt reportedly totaled more than $50,000 and his struggles with suicide and substance abuse have been well documented.

Chesnutt leaves us with a catalog of 13 studio albums, including this year's critically acclaimed 'At the Cut,' which he was recently out on the road supporting. In a live review of one of those shows, the New York Times noted that Chesnutt's songs were contemplations on "not just mortality but also the broader inevitability of collapse and decay."

In an interview with Spinner this past September, Chesnutt admitted that, as an artist, he was difficult to pigeonhole into one specific genre. "I was labeled as alt-country for years but I never saw that at all," he said. "I like it when you're confused by an artist for a minute. I like it when everything popping out of your iPod from a band is not the same crap over and over. That makes me happy."

Vic Chesnutt -- both the man and his music -- made many people happy. We will remember him for that, and for his songs, which will continue to give us moments of catharsis and release.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on December 25, 2009, 11:13:25 AM
The Sports Machine was a must-see for DD during the late 1980s come every Sunday night at 23:30.

R.I.P GM
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on December 28, 2009, 02:46:19 AM
A moment of silence was had for him at the Dallas game tonight.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on December 30, 2009, 01:13:23 PM
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Mythbusters Erik Gates Dies After 30 Feet Fall

Erik Gates, the 47-year-old rocketry expert who appeared on Discovery Channel's 'MythBusters' died Sunday in a freak accident.

Gather reports that Gates fell 30 feet to his death through a rooftop skylight on which he and a colleague were working. Gates suffered blunt force chest injuries, but was still talking after the fall, according to the report. He died later at Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, CA.

Gates owned Gateco Electric and he and the company's CFO appeared as amateur experts, alongside special effects gurus Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman (pictured right). On the show, myths, rumors and other pop cultural phemon are put to the test, such as whether a banana peel can actually make a person slip. Team experiments are then labeled as "busted," "plausible" or "confirmed."

The show has since expressed its condolences on Twitter.

"Team MB wishes to express our deepest sympathies on the passing of our beloved rocket expert, Erik," the show wrote. "You were an honorary MythBuster and will be sorely missed."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on December 30, 2009, 08:59:04 PM
at least it wasn't kylie.  or kailey.  or kathryn.  whatever her name is.  geek boobs.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 31, 2009, 03:04:45 PM
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R.I.P. Zelda Rubinstein

Yesterday, Dec 29th, actress Zelda Rubinstein was taken off of life support at Cedar Sinai. The 76-year-old star has spent more than a month at Los Angeles' Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where her liver and kidneys failed. A friend told Radaronline.com, "It's only a matter of time now - she doesn't have long to live."

Rubinstein played the high-voiced psychic Tangina in all three Poltergeist films, as well as Madame Serena in the campy Teen Witch. She also appeared on a number of TV shows and horror movies, her last role as the Narrator on the reality series The Scariest Places on Earth. We'll all miss Zelda and her funny, campy, creepy roles.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on December 31, 2009, 07:17:07 PM
Poltergeist is such an awesome movie
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 06, 2010, 03:11:34 PM
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Tsutomu Yamaguchi was a respected teacher and a beloved father and grandfather. So far, so unusual. But Mr Yamaguchi, who has died in Nagasaki at the age of 93, was special. He was one of the small number of people to fall victim to both the atomic bombs that fell on Japan 64 years ago.

On August 6, 1945, he was about to leave the city of Hiroshima, where he had been working for a few weeks, when the first bomb exploded, killing 140,000 people. Stunned and injured, he fled to his home town, Nagasaki, 180 miles to the west. There, on August 9, the second atomic bomb exploded over his head.

A few dozen other people were in the same position, but none expressed the experience, or the indignation which it inspired, with as much emotion and fervour.

Towards the end of his life, Mr Yamaguchi became the only man to be officially registered as a hibakusha, or atomic bomb victim, in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

“I think that it is a miracle,” he told The Times, on the 60th anniversary of the bombings in 2005. “But, having been granted this miracle, it is my responsibility to pass on the truth to the people of the world. For the past 60 years, atomic bomb survivors have declared the horror of the atomic bomb, but I can see hardly any improvement in the situation.”

In the summer of 1945, he was 29, and working as a technical draughtsman designing oil tankers for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. His three-month secondment to a shipyard in Hiroshima was due to end on the morning of August 6, the day that the American B-29 bomber Enola Gay dropped a 13 kiloton uranium atomic bomb which exploded above Hiroshima at 8.15am.

“I didn’t know what had happened,” Mr Yamaguchi went on. “I think I fainted for a while. When I opened my eyes, everything was dark, and I couldn’t see much. It was like the start of a film at the cinema, before the picture has begun when the blank frames are just flashing up without any sound. I thought I might have died, but eventually the darkness cleared and I realised I was alive.”

With burns on his face and arms, he and two colleagues staggered through the ruins of the city, where the dead and dying lay all around. At one point, the three men had to wade through a river, parting before them a floating carpet of corpses. They reached the station, and forced their way on to the train for Nagasaki. Reporting to work at the shipyard the next day, August 9, his story of a single bomb destroying an entire city was met with incredulity.

“The director was angry. He said: ‘You’ve obviously been badly injured, and I think you’ve gone a little mad.’ At that moment, outside the window, I saw another flash and the whole office, everything in it, was blown over.”

The next thing he remembered was waking from a delirium to hear crying and cheering at the broadcast by Emperor Hirohito announcing Japan’s surrender.

A post-war career as a teacher and a long retirement followed, and Mr Yamaguchi rarely spoke publicly of his experiences. He began to do so only in 2005 after the death from cancer of his middle-aged son, Katsutoshi, a death which his father attributed to his exposure to radiation as an infant.

“The son of 59 died, leaving the father of 89 behind,” he said. “He was still a baby to me. The death of my son takes away my will to live.”

Like most hibakusha, Mr Yamaguchi’s hatred of the bomb never expressed itself in anti-Americanism. One of his last visitors, as he lay dying of stomach cancer late last month, was the US film director, James Cameron, who is considering making a film about the atomic bombs.

“I believe in love, in human beings,” he said. “The reason that I hate the atomic bomb is because of what it does to the dignity of human beings.

"Look at the photographs of the aftermath of the atomic bombing, those dead bodies in the photographs. When you forget the dignity of individual human beings, that it is when you are heading towards the destruction of the Earth.”
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 06, 2010, 04:23:29 PM
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    "A government official says the 89-year-old man accused of a deadly shooting at Washington's Holocaust museum has died in a prison hospital.

    The official, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the case, says James von Brunn died at a federal complex in Butner, North Carolina.

    Von Brunn had been awaiting trial for the killing of security guard Stephen T. Johns at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum on June 10. Von Brunn had been wounded by return fire but survived."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 19, 2010, 10:56:01 AM


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At the age of 77, "just sitting at his desk" at his home in the Boston area, according to his U.K. publisher Quercus, Robert B. Parker is dead. I'm really not sure how to process this. Not at all. I suppose it's exactly the way the author best known for his Spenser private detective novels, who by the latter portion of his career was up to publishing three novels a year, working at a five to ten page-a-day clip, should die - doing exactly what he was doing, day in, day out.

He is survived by his wife, Joan, and his sons, David, a choreographer, and Daniel, an actor. Several more novels will be published in 2010, including SPLIT IMAGE, the newest Jesse Stone novel (out February 23) and BLUE-EYED DEVIL, an Appaloosa novel (out on May 4). Much, much more soon, and something tells me a whole lot of tributes will be rolling in over the next day or two.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 19, 2010, 06:29:02 PM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/01/18/AR2010011803803.html

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Glen W. Bell Jr., 86, the innovator and entrepreneur who tapped an unsatiated hunger for Mexican fare as Americans discovered fast food, creating Taco Tia, El Taco and in 1962 his signature Taco Bell, died Sunday at his home in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. He had Parkinson's disease.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 20, 2010, 12:29:56 PM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/01/19/AR2010011904354.html

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Erich Segal, a onetime classics professor who collaborated with the Beatles on a movie and whose sentimental 1970 screenplay and novel, "Love Story," became a pop-culture phenomenon, died Jan. 17 of a heart attack at his home in London. He was 72 and had battled Parkinson's disease for 25 years.

Mr. Segal, who taught Greek and Roman literature at Yale University, might have been an unlikely author of a heart-tugging tale of doomed romance, but his story captured the spirit of the time, and its signature line became a catch phrase: "Love means never having to say you're sorry."

Mr. Segal dabbled in screenplays for years, and he said his writing credit on the Beatles' "Yellow Submarine" in 1968 elicited open-eyed admiration from students and professors alike.

He had originally written "Love Story" as a screenplay about the star-crossed love between a working-class Italian girl from Radcliffe and a Harvard boy from an old family. The 1970 film, which starred Ali MacGraw and Ryan O'Neal and became a huge hit, was in production before Mr. Segal reworked it as a novel. When "Love Story" was released in paperback, it had the largest print order in the publishing history at the time, with 4,325,000 copies.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Matt on January 27, 2010, 07:30:57 PM
Howard Zinn died today I'm so angry
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on January 28, 2010, 02:22:22 PM
Holy shit, J.D. Salinger died.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 28, 2010, 02:27:43 PM
Holy shit, J.D. Salinger died.

30 years too late!

But the good news is that, now, we can get inundated with Salinger novels.  Maynard says he was writing two novels a year throughout the 70's, and his daughter has suggested that he has a library of completed novels.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on January 28, 2010, 02:33:35 PM
When I was in HS, we had to write letters to him twice just to see if he would respond.  Of course, he never did. 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 10, 2010, 04:57:09 PM
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DALLAS -- Charlie Wilson, the former U.S. congressman from Texas whose funding of Afghanistan's resistance to the Soviet Union was chronicled in the movie "Charlie Wilson's War," has died. He was 76.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/10/AR2010021002564.html?hpid=topnews
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 16, 2010, 01:33:18 PM
And Dick Francis...

Obit here:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/3411283.stm

Happened during the Snowpocalypse,which means it isn't real!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 17, 2010, 02:43:54 PM
The Father Dowling guy died:

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Mystery Author Ralph McInerny (Father Dowling Mysteries) Dies at Age 80
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 22, 2010, 12:26:01 PM
Haig died:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Haig

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Alexander Meigs Haig, Jr. (December 2, 1924 – February 20, 2010) was a United States Army general who served as the United States Secretary of State under President Ronald Reagan and White House Chief of Staff under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford.[1] He also served as Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, the number-two ranking officer in the Army,[2] and as Supreme Allied Commander Europe commanding all U.S. and NATO forces in Europe.

A veteran of the Korean War and Vietnam War, Haig was a recipient of the Distinguished Service Cross, the Silver Star with oak leaf cluster, and the Purple Heart.[3]

On February 20, 2010, Haig died from complications from a staphylococcal infection after being hospitalized at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore on January 28, 2010.[4]
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on February 22, 2010, 08:45:34 PM
The immortal "Boner" from Growing Pains is missing and feared suicidal...stay tuned.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 22, 2010, 08:46:51 PM
I think Nacho posted this in another thread.

I never realized he was Walter 'Chekov' Koenig's son.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 22, 2010, 09:38:09 PM
Yeah, I put it in the TV news thread over in the TV forum.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 26, 2010, 12:39:40 AM
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Andrew Koenig Dead: 'Growing Pains' Actor's Body Found After Suicide
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on March 10, 2010, 09:58:34 AM
Corey Haim dead at 38!  OD'd. 
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 10, 2010, 11:14:08 AM
Corey Haim dead at 38!  OD'd. 

Dude...you need to back that shit up with proof!  That's a big deal!

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Actor Corey Haim, 38, is dead after an accidental drug overdose. A spokesperson for the Los Angeles County Coroner confirmed that Haim, who battled substance addiction for several years, was found unresponsive in an Oakwood apartment and pronounced dead at Providence St. Joseph’s Medical Center at 2:15 a.m. this morning. His mother, according to FOX station KTLA, was in the apartment at the time.

A small part of the 80's just died...

There's a new star in the sky tonight.  And it is licensed to drive.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on March 10, 2010, 08:26:28 PM
I totally DD'd the OD!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Sirharles on March 11, 2010, 05:34:25 PM
Merlin Olson died.

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=AkGR1G3DSf1Ey7YrLJ4FIpY5nYcB?slug=ap-obit-olsen&prov=ap&type=lgns
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 14, 2010, 11:51:33 PM
"Do you like movies about Gladiators?"

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'Mission: Impossible' star Peter Graves dies in LA

LOS ANGELES – Peter Graves, the tall, stalwart actor likely best known for his portrayal of Jim Phelps, leader of a gang of special agents who battled evil conspirators in the long-running television series "Mission: Impossible," died Sunday.

Graves died of an apparent heart attack outside his Los Angeles home, publicist Sandy Brokaw said. He would have been 84 this week.

Graves had just returned from brunch with his wife and kids and collapsed before he made it into the house, Brokaw said. One of his daughters administered CPR but was unable to revive him. Graves' family doctor visited the house and believed he had a heart attack, Brokaw said.

Although Graves never achieved the stardom his older brother, James Arness, enjoyed as Marshall Matt Dillon on TV's "Gunsmoke," he had a number of memorable roles in both films and television.

Normally cast as a hero, he turned in an unforgettable performance early in his career as the treacherous Nazi spy in Billy Wilder's 1953 prisoner-of-war drama "Stalag 17."

He also masterfully lampooned his straight-arrow image when he portrayed bumbling airline pilot Clarence Oveur in the 1980 disaster movie spoof "Airplane!"

Graves appeared in dozens of films and a handful of television shows in a career of nearly 60 years.

The authority and trust he projected made him a favorite for commercials late in his life, and he was often encouraged to go into politics.

"He had this statesmanlike quality," Brokaw said. "People were always encouraging him to run for office. But he said, 'I like acting. I like being around actors.'"

Graves' career began with cheaply made exploitation films like "It Conquered the World," in which he battled a carrot-shaped monster from Venus, and "Beginning of the World," in which he fought a giant grasshopper.

He later took on equally formidable human villains each week on "Mission: Impossible."

Every show began with Graves, as agent Phelps, listening to a tape of instructions outlining his team's latest mission and explaining that if he or any of his agents were killed or captured "the secretary will disavow any knowledge of your actions."

The tape always self-destructed within seconds of being played.

The show ran on CBS from 1967 to 1973 and was revived on ABC from 1988 to 1990 with Graves back as the only original cast member.

The actor credited clever writing for the show's success.

"It made you think a little bit and kept you on the edge of your seat because you never knew what was going to happen next," he once said.

He also played roles in such films as John Ford's "The Long Gray Line" and Charles Laughton's "The Night of the Hunter," as well as "The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell," "Texas Across the River" and "The Ballad of Josie."

Graves' first television series was a children's Saturday morning show, "Fury," about an orphan and his untamed black stallion. Filmed in Australia, it lasted six years on NBC. A western, "Whiplash," also shot in Australia, played for a year in syndication, and the British-made "Court-Martial" appeared on ABC for one season. In his later years, Graves brought his white-haired eminence to PBS as host of "Discover: The World of Science" and A&E's "Biography" series.

He noted during an interview in 2000 that he made his foray into comedy somewhat reluctantly.

Filmmakers Jim Abrahams and David and Jerry Zucker had written a satire on the airplane-in-trouble movies, and they wanted Graves and fellow handsome actors Lloyd Bridges, Leslie Nielsen and Robert Stack to spoof their serious images.

All agreed, but Graves admitted to nervousness. On the one hand, he said, he considered the role a challenge, "but it also scared me."

"I thought I could lose a whole long acting career," he recalled.

"Airplane!" became a box-office smash, and Graves returned for "Airplane II, The Sequel."

Born Peter Aurness in Minneapolis, Graves adopted his grandfather's last name to avoid confusion with his older brother, James, who had dropped the "U" from the family name.

He was a champion hurdler in high school, as well as a clarinet player in dance bands and a radio announcer.

After two years in the Air Force, he enrolled at the University of Minnesota as a drama major and worked in summer stock before following his brother west to Hollywood.

He found enough success there to send for his college sweetheart, Joan Endress. They were married in 1950 and had three daughters — Kelly Jean, Claudia King and Amanda Lee — and six grandchildren.

Graves credited the couple's Midwest upbringing for a marriage that lasted more than 50 years in a town not known for long unions.

"Hollywood or New York ... can be very flighty and dangerous places to live, but the good grounding we had in the Midwest ethic I think helped us all our lives," he said.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on March 15, 2010, 09:58:41 AM
Is there a term for the shock-to-shamed-grief you feel when you hear that someone you've thought has been dead for a long time has died?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 15, 2010, 11:06:04 AM
Corey Haim dead at 38!  OD'd. 

Dude...you need to back that shit up with proof!  That's a big deal!

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Actor Corey Haim, 38, is dead after an accidental drug overdose. A spokesperson for the Los Angeles County Coroner confirmed that Haim, who battled substance addiction for several years, was found unresponsive in an Oakwood apartment and pronounced dead at Providence St. Joseph’s Medical Center at 2:15 a.m. this morning. His mother, according to FOX station KTLA, was in the apartment at the time.

A small part of the 80's just died...

There's a new star in the sky tonight.  And it is licensed to drive.

Jeez...

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And now comes another sad bit of news in the aftermath of Corey Haim's death. According to media reports, his family has little money left to pay for the funeral of the '80s teen idol, so a Paypal fund has been set up his Corey's official website.

In addition, most of Haim's personal belongs are being auctioned away on eBay.

"I have been given most all of Corey's belongings to put on eBay to sell for the family to pay for his funeral expenses," one listing by family friend Scott Schwartz reads. "Corey had no savings and his family is really in need!"

Schwartz is best known to '80s fans for playing "Flick" in the 1983 movie A Christmas Story. According to Schwartz's eBay listings, Corey Haim had "no savings and his family is really in need."

One item for sale right now is an Italian suit jacket worn by Haim. The starting bid is $399.95

Longtime friend Corey Feldman told Larry King this week that he was "angry, hurt and sad" by the public's reaction.

"Where were all these people the last 10 years, the last 15 years, of Corey's life," Feldman asked the talk show host. "Where were all these people to lend a handout, to reach out to him and say, you're a legend, you're an amazingly talented wonderful person who's never really gone out of his way to hurt anyone, other than himself?"

"In this entertainment industry, in Hollywood, we build people up as children, we put them on pedestals, and then, when we decide they're not marketable anymore, we walk away from them," he added. "Then we taunt them and we tease them … It's okay for society as a whole to poke fun at, to point fingers at, us as human beings. Why is it okay to kick somebody when they're down? I don't think it should be tolerated anymore."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 24, 2010, 07:36:25 PM
God...sad news.

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Greatest American Hero's Robert Culp dead at 79

Greatestamericanherotvposter008 Actor Robert Culp, best known to '80s fans for his role as Bill Maxwell in The Greatest American Hero, has died at age 79.

Culp was rushed to the hospital in Los Angeles on Wednesday morning after falling and hitting his head during a walk outside his home, the L.A. Times reports. No foul play is suspected.

The actor starred alongside William Katt in Greatest American Hero from 1981 to 1986. He also appeared as "Mayor Tyler" in the movie Turk 182. Much of his career work was in television, including guest spots on Murder She Wrote, Hotel, Matlock and Who's The Boss.

Culp will probaly always be best known for appearing alongside Bill Cosby in the hit 1960s television series I Spy. Another notable movie role was playing the president in 1994's The Pelican Brief.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 25, 2010, 09:18:12 AM
We're at that age, man.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on March 26, 2010, 12:53:17 PM
Beeeeee lieve it or not I'm walkin on aaair I never thought I could be so free EE EEEEEE
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 31, 2010, 10:33:10 AM
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Jaime Escalante, who transformed a tough East L.A. high school by motivating inner-city students to master advanced math and inspired the 1988 movie Stand and Deliver, died Tuesday at age 79 of cancer, the AP reports.
Edward James Olmos was nominated for an Academy Award and Golden Globe for playing Escalante in the film based on his story. Lou Diamond Phillips was nominated for a Golden Globe for best supporting actor. (Alas, that was the year Rain Man cleaned up at award ceremonies.)

"Jaime exposed one of the most dangerous myths of our time - that inner city students can't be expected to perform at the highest levels," Olmos told the AP. "Because of him, that destructive idea has been shattered forever."

Beginning in the early '80s, Escalante overhauled Garfield High School's math curriculum and pushed his classes until the school had more advanced placement calculus students than all but four other public high schools in the country. According to the AP, Escalante retired to Bolivia in 2001, where he was receiving alternative cancer treatments.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 01, 2010, 05:00:34 PM
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The death of 48-year-old screenwriter David Mills, who won an Emmy for his work on the Baltimore production of HBO’s “The Corner,” hit members of the Maryland-Hollywood TV and film communities hard yesterday.


Mills, who was born in Maryland and started his writing career as a reporter at the student-run University of Maryland The Diamondback newspaper, collapsed Tuesday in New Orleans on the set of the HBO drama, “Treme.” He died in a New Orleans Hospital, according to series creator David Simon. The cause of death was a brain aneurysm.


“He was an enormous talent,” Simon said in an obituary statement released by HBO Wednesday. “He loved words and he loved an argument – but not in any angry or mean-spirited way.  He loved to argue ideas.  He delighted in it, and he was confident that something smarter and deeper always came from a good argument.”


“The Maryland area lost a very good writer and a really nice gentleman,” actor and director Charles. S. Dutton said from Boston where he was in rehearsals for a new play. “I had loads of respect for him.”

David Mills (far right) with the "Treme" writing staff. (From left) Tom Piazza, David Simon, Lolis Elie and Eric Overmyer. Photo by Mary Howell for HBO.
Dutton won an Emmy for his direction of “The Corner,” an acclaimed HBO mini-series about a West Baltimore family trying to escape the culture of drugs. Mills and Simon won Emmys for their writing and production of the series that aired in 2000.


“He and Simon loved working together,” said Rafael Alvarez, a former Sun reporter who also wrote for the Baltimore-based series as NBC’s “Homicide: Life on the Street” and HBO’s “The Wire.”


“Mills grew up in the African-American community and brought a real authenticity to the internal dynamics of the characters that a white writer could not,” Alvarez added.


Mills and Simon's were friends since their college days on The Diamondback. The duo went from being newspaper reporters -- Simon at The Baltimore Sun and Mills at The Washington Times and Washington Post -- to instant success as two of the best screenwriters working in TV crime drama in 1993 they co-wrote an episode titled “Bop Gun” for the NBC “Homicide” series based on Simon’s book.


The episode, which aired in 1994, starred Robin Williams in a story line involving a tourist who is murdered near Camden Yards. The work won the Writers Guild of America Award for best writing for an episodic drama.


Mills later went on to join the writing staff at "NYPD Blue” which was led by executive producers David Milch and Steven Bochco.


“David Mills was a brave and resourceful spirit and an extraordinary writer,” Milch says in the HBO statement.  “I so deeply regret his loss as a friend, but more profoundly as an irreplaceable asset in the writing community.”


Mills also wrote for the NBC medical drama "ER." In 2003, he created and served as executive producer for the short-lived NBC crime drama, "Kingpin," the saga of a Mexican drug operation.


“’Kingpin -- that was his baby,” Alvarez said.


While the writing was again top-notch Mills, the series failed to attract an audience right out of the box, and was cancelled after six episodes. It was Mills' bad luck to be working in network TV rather than pay cable, where the series would have surely found an audience had it been given a chance to grow.


Though he lived in Los Angeles, Mills spent a lot of time in the Baltimore and Washington area because of his involvement on "The Corner," "Homicide" and "The Wire." In the 1990s, he appeared several times as a guest on what is now WYPR-FM, Baltimore's public radio station.


While the interviews always started out with a focus on TV screenwriting, they invariably spun off into his passions -- George Clinton and the Parliament/Funkadelic, media, race and politics. The enthusiasm that Mills brought to such topics was contagious.


“Mostly, my sense of him is that he was a very gentle, somewhat quiet soul with a huge passion for music,” Alvarez remembered. “He wrote a book about George Clinton and Parliament/Funkadelic of which he was very proud. I don’t think it got a lot of attention outside of the music world, but it was a labor of love.”


The book “George Clinton & P-Funk: An Oral History” was published in 1998.


In recent years, Mills wrote about media, music, race and politics on his blog, "Undercover Black Man." His autobiographical information at that site is vintage Mills in its economy, firm sense of professional identity and the central role that writing played throughout his adult life.


"I used to write for newspapers," he said. "Now I write for TV shows."


Matt Neufeld, news editor at Carroll Publishing in Bethesda, worked with Mills at the Diamondback in the 1980s and later at the Washington Times.


“Dave was a thoughtful, throught-provoking, introspective and intelligent guy who could write up a storm, either for his many memorable newspaper features, or for his many television scripts,” Nuefeld said. “Dave had great imagination and talent, and he left us far, far too soon.  If there was ever a time that television sorely needed someone with Dave’s talent, it is now.”


Mills is survived by two sisters, Blanche Carroll of Peoria, Arizona, and Gloria Johnson of Charlotte, N.C.; and one brother, Franklin Mills, of Washington D.C.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on April 02, 2010, 12:53:06 AM
The Corner still might be the most realistic portrayal of ghetto life and its narcotic trade ever aired on American TV.... Not to mention the influence it had on the show that now for better or worse epitomizes Baltimore to the world: The Wire.


Nowadays in damn near every corner of the globe, when most folks (especially immigration officers) see Maryland listed as yours truly's birthplace; the first thing out of their mouth is usually related to The Wire.



Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Poppy Propercock on April 02, 2010, 10:26:42 AM
The Corner still might be the most realistic portrayal of ghetto life and its narcotic trade ever aired on American TV.

It's true...  when I lived in Baltimore, I rode the bus past Fayette and Monroe every day for almost two years.  Saw some pretty scary things going on.  Did you ever read the book?  It's a tough one.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on April 03, 2010, 01:32:56 AM
No, but I do remember the final show did have an epilogue which contained brief interviews with the real life survivors of that corner. Will put the book on my to-read list as of now.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 05, 2010, 04:34:14 PM
So, John Forsythe over the weekend...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Forsythe
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on April 06, 2010, 01:57:30 AM
ah...time for a "Hello, angels" joke!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 08, 2010, 05:11:24 PM
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It's hard to really conceive of a more unique creature in the music scene of the '70s and '80s than Malcolm McLaren, who died Thursday in New York at age 64.

Some people will remember his best as the manager of the Sex Pistols and New York Dolls. He once famously claimed to be the "inventor" of punk rock. (Well, he at least mastered the promotion of it.) Other covet his solo music career in the '80s, including his mighty Duck Rock album.

In the late '80s, McLaren -- always looking for the next big thing -- got into music arranging for advertising. The catchy British Airways ditty of the '80s and ''90s? That was McLaren too.

His official Web site today only has the strangely prophetic message: "Malcolm will return shortly."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 08, 2010, 05:25:15 PM
64 seems young, but great lights burn strong and quick.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on April 09, 2010, 10:39:46 AM
In a book I read (and gave to Nubbins), most people who were there weren't too fond of McLaren.  He seemed to be more of a hack and opportunist than a rock and roll legend.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on April 09, 2010, 11:09:54 AM
Yes!  I am actually just starting that book!  I don't think McLaren was a whole lot different than other big name people behind the scenes in the music biz, really.  He was the Don King of punk rock.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 15, 2010, 08:19:56 AM
From the Bloody Disgusting horror review site...


Quote
We don't usually report music news here on the front page, but this one struck me pretty hard as I still listen to Type O Negative's "October Rust" on a nearly daily basis (14 years and counting). Mistress Juliya of Fuse TV posted on Twitter today the heart sinking message, "Peter Steele passed today," later adding, "He passed of heart failure today. Just spoke to Kenny [Hickey]." There has been no official statement, although KNAC is claiming to have confirmed at 11:15PM PST. Peter Steele, born Petrus T. Ratajczyk on January 4, 1962 in Brooklyn, was 48.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on April 16, 2010, 02:57:20 AM
who? did the 90s happen?  no one is sure.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 03, 2010, 01:45:29 PM
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Lynn Redgrave, the actress best known for films such as Georgy Girl  and Gods and Monsters, died yesterday. Redgrave, who was treated for cancer in 2003 and last appeared in a 2009 episode of Ugly Betty, came from an accomplished family of actors that included her parents, her brother, her sister, Vanessa, and her nieces, Natasha and Joely Richardson.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 10, 2010, 06:46:19 PM
Lena Horne died.

File under "thought they were dead long ago."

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Born on June 30, 1917, Lena Horne was considered one of the most beautiful women in the world. She came to the attention of Hollywood in 1942 and was the first black woman to sign a meaningful long-term contract with a major studio, a contract that said she would never have to play a maid.

Horne died at the age of 92 on May 9 at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 10, 2010, 07:42:00 PM
And the Sonic guy died:

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Troy N. Smith, Sr. died at age 87 in Oklahoma City. In the 1950s, he ran the Top Hat Drive-In which had car-hop service in Shawnee, Oklahoma. he started using call boxes for ordering which reduced trips the car-hops had to make and led to the slogan "Service at the speed of sound. Unable to trademark the Top Hat Name, Mr. Smith used his slogan and came up with the name "Sonic."

Today, the Sonic Drive-In chain is one of the fastest-growing ones in the US with 3,600 units in 42 states which served over a million customers daily. We just got one up in our area, Chicago's Northwest Suburbs, in Lake Zurich, Illinois. Surprising because it gets so cold around here.

Mr. Smith was born in 1922.

He was helped in establishing the chain by Charles Pappe who stopped into the Stillwater site and was so impressed he invested.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 10, 2010, 07:52:37 PM
We lost Frazetta too.

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Manager: Renowned fantasy artist Frank Frazetta, 82, dies

PHILADELPHIA — Pioneering fantasy artist Frank Frazetta died Monday in a Fort Myers, Fla., hospital, a manager said. He was 82.

Frazetta had been out to dinner with his daughters Sunday but suffered a stroke at his Boca Grande home later that night and was taken to Lee Memorial Hospital, manager Rob Pistella said. A hospital spokeswoman confirmed the death, as did his daughter Heidi Frazetta Grabin.

"He's going to be remembered as the most renowned fantasy illustrator of the 20th Century," Pistella said.

Frazetta created covers and illustrations for more than 150 books and comic books, along with album covers, movie posters and original paintings. His illustrations of Conan the Barbarian, Tarzan, Vampirella and other characters influenced many later artists.

His children have fought over an estate estimated to be worth tens of millions of dollars, filing lawsuits in Pennsylvania and Florida.

His son, Alfonso Frank Frazetta, 52, was charged in December with using a backhoe to break into the artist's museum in Pennsylvania's Pocono Mountains and trying to remove 90 paintings insured for $20 million. The charges were dropped late last month after two days of mediation produced a truce.

"It is resolved, but there's always new issues that can come out," daughter Heidi Frazetta Grabin said.

Frazetta had a history of strokes, but appeared well and was still painting, she and Pistella said.

Grabin and her sister, Holly Frazetta Taylor, dined out with their father Sunday to celebrate Mother's Day, then walked with him on Englewood Beach.

"We had a lovely time, and he just talked about how beautiful the sunset was, and how his next studio was going to have windows around it overlooking the Gulf," Grabin said.

Alfonso Frank Frazetta did not return a message Monday.

A lawsuit he had filed in Florida alleged that his sisters and brother Billy were plotting to wrest control of the family business and fortune from him after their mother died in July 2009.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 16, 2010, 06:28:38 PM
This one hurts.

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Metal legend Ronnie James Dio dead at 67

Ronnie James Dio, whose soaring vocals, poetic lyrics and mythic tales of a never-ending struggle between good and evil broke new ground in heavy metal, died Sunday, according to a statement from his wife and manager. He was 67.

Dio revealed last summer that he was suffering from stomach cancer shortly after wrapping up a tour in Atlantic City, N.J. with the latest incarnation of Black Sabbath, under the name Heaven And Hell.

"Today my heart is broken, Wendy Dio wrote on the singer's site, adding he died at 7:45 a.m. "Many, many friends and family were able to say their private goodbyes before he peacefully passed away.

"Ronnie knew how much he was loved by all, Wendy Dio continued. "We so appreciate the love and support that you have all given us ... Please know he loved you all and his music will live on forever."

The statement was confirmed by Los Angeles publicist Maureen O'Connor.

Dio rose to fame in 1975 as the first lead singer of Rainbow, the heavy metal band put together by guitarist Ritchie Blackmore, who had just quit Deep Purple.

Dio then replaced legendary vocalist Ozzy Osbourne in Black Sabbath in 1980 with the critically acclaimed album "Heaven And Hell, considered by many critics to be one of the finest heavy metal albums of all time. His on-again, off-again tenure with Black Sabbath touched off an intense debate among fans as to which singer was the true essence of the band — a discussion that lasted until his death.

He also enjoyed a successful solo career with his self-titled band, Dio, in between his three stints with Black Sabbath (1980-82; 1992; and 2007-2009, when the band toured as Heaven And Hell, to differentiate it from Osbourne-led versions of Sabbath).

Many of his most memorable songs revolved around the struggle between good and evil, including his signature tune "Heaven And Hell. He also drew heavily on medieval imagery in songs like "Neon Knights, "Killing The Dragon and "Stargazer.

"He possessed one of the greatest voices in all of heavy metal, and had a heart to match it, said Twisted Sister guitarist Jay Jay French, whose band toured with Dio since 1983, and was to do so again this summer at European rock festivals. "He was the nicest, classiest person you would ever want to meet.

Dio organized an all-star charity collaboration in 1986 called "Hear N Aid to raise money for famine relief in Africa, styled on the successful "We Are The World campaign of a few years earlier.

His solo hits included "Rainbow In The Dark, "The Last In Line and "Holy Diver.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 20, 2010, 02:57:59 PM
Quote
The inventor of the cash machine has died, leaving a legacy now used worldwide. What do you think of the old hole-in-the-wall?

John Shepherd-Barron, who invented the automated teller machine (ATM), died in Inverness last weekend. The Scot came up with the idea after deciding that banks should operate a system similar to a chocolate vending machine.

In 1967, On the Buses star Reg Varney was first to make a withdrawal from the world's first ATM, at Barclays' Enfield branch in London, and the machines are now used about 5,500 times a minute in the UK.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on May 21, 2010, 11:22:57 AM
I needed to know more about how a machine like that worked in the sixties...

Quote
Plastic cards had not been invented, so Mr Shepherd-Barron's machine used cheques that were impregnated with carbon 14, a mildly radioactive substance.

The machine detected it, then matched the cheque against a Pin number.

However, Mr Shepherd-Barron denies there were any health concerns: "I later worked out you would have to eat 136,000 such cheques for it to have any effect on you."

The machine paid out a maximum of £10 a time.

"But that was regarded then as quite enough for a wild weekend," he says.

To start with, not everything went smoothly. The first machines were vandalised, and one that was installed in Zurich in Switzerland began to malfunction mysteriously.

It was later discovered that the wires from two intersecting tramlines nearby were sparking and interfering with the mechanism.

One by-product of inventing the first cash machine was the concept of the Pin number.

Mr Shepherd-Barron came up with the idea when he realised that he could remember his six-figure army number. But he decided to check that with his wife, Caroline.

"Over the kitchen table, she said she could only remember four figures, so because of her, four figures became the world standard," he laughs.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 21, 2010, 11:33:52 AM
So everything in finance is thanks to a random housewife's inability to hold a thought in her head and the desire to have radioactive cashpoints throughout the world?  It's like a Flash Gordon serial!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on May 21, 2010, 11:42:30 AM
yes, everything in finance.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 21, 2010, 11:43:27 AM
Including numbers!

Quit riding me, I've been drinking since 8:30am.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on May 21, 2010, 11:44:19 AM
that's when i stopped!  not really.  but i still feel like i brushed my teeth with Evan Williams' toothpaste.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 26, 2010, 09:44:13 PM
Yet another "I thought they were already dead" person:

Quote
Legendary TV host Art Linkletter, who perfected the art of asking people questions and having them respond with absurd answers, died at home today at the age of 97. The host of People Are Funny and House Party was loved by millions of Americans even if, as the Times  puts it, "television critics and intellectuals found the Linkletter persona bland and his popularity unfathomable."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 28, 2010, 10:37:55 AM
Deathwatch!


Quote
The former child actor is in critical condition at a Utah hospital after undergoing emergency surgery following a head injury he suffered during a fall. Coleman, 42, was taken to the hospital around 12:50 p.m. Wednesday. He reportedly suffered a seizure in February during a television interview, and was also hospitalized in January after what a friend of his described as a seizure.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 28, 2010, 04:44:27 PM
Deathwatch!


Quote
The former child actor is in critical condition at a Utah hospital after undergoing emergency surgery following a head injury he suffered during a fall. Coleman, 42, was taken to the hospital around 12:50 p.m. Wednesday. He reportedly suffered a seizure in February during a television interview, and was also hospitalized in January after what a friend of his described as a seizure.

And...dead.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 29, 2010, 04:11:51 PM
Quote
Dennis Hopper, creator of hit 'Easy Rider,' dies

LOS ANGELES – Dennis Hopper, the high-flying Hollywood wild man whose memorable and erratic career included an early turn in "Rebel Without a Cause," an improbable smash with "Easy Rider" and a classic character role in "Blue Velvet," has died. He was 74.

Hopper died Saturday at his home in the Los Angeles beach community of Venice, surrounded by family and friends, family friend Alex Hitz said. Hopper's manager announced in October 2009 that he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer.

The success of "Easy Rider," and the spectacular failure of his next film, "The Last Movie," fit the pattern for the talented but sometimes uncontrollable actor-director, who also had parts in such favorites as "Apocalypse Now" and "Hoosiers." He was a two-time Academy Award nominee, and in March 2010, was honored with a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame.

After a promising start that included roles in two James Dean films, Hopper's acting career had languished as he developed a reputation for throwing tantrums and abusing alcohol and drugs. On the set of "True Grit," Hopper so angered John Wayne that the star reportedly chased Hopper with a loaded gun.

He married five times and led a dramatic life right to the end. In January 2010, Hopper filed to end his 14-year marriage to Victoria Hopper, who stated in court filings that the actor was seeking to cut her out of her inheritance, a claim Hopper denied.

"Much of Hollywood," wrote critic-historian David Thomson, "found Hopper a pain in the neck."

All was forgiven, at least for a moment, when he collaborated with another struggling actor, Peter Fonda, on a script about two pot-smoking, drug-dealing hippies on a motorcycle trip through the Southwest and South to take in the New Orleans Mardi Gras.

On the way, Hopper and Fonda befriend a drunken young lawyer (Jack Nicholson, whom Hopper had resisted casting, in a breakout role), but arouse the enmity of Southern rednecks and are murdered before they can return home.

"'Easy Rider' was never a motorcycle movie to me," Hopper said in 2009. "A lot of it was about politically what was going on in the country."

Fonda produced "Easy Rider" and Hopper directed it for a meager $380,000. It went on to gross $40 million worldwide, a substantial sum for its time. The film caught on despite tension between Hopper and Fonda and between Hopper and the original choice for Nicholson's part, Rip Torn, who quit after a bitter argument with the director.

The film was a hit at Cannes, netted a best-screenplay Oscar nomination for Hopper, Fonda and Terry Southern, and has since been listed on the American Film Institute's ranking of the top 100 American films. The establishment gave official blessing in 1998 when "Easy Rider" was included in the United States National Film Registry for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

Its success prompted studio heads to schedule a new kind of movie: low cost, with inventive photography and themes about a young, restive baby boom generation. With Hopper hailed as a brilliant filmmaker, Universal Pictures lavished $850,000 on his next project, "The Last Movie."

The title was prescient. Hopper took a large cast and crew to a village in Peru to film the tale of a Peruvian tribe corrupted by a movie company. Trouble on the set developed almost immediately, as Peruvian authorities pestered the company, drug-induced orgies were reported and Hopper seemed out of control.

When he finally completed filming, he retired to his home in Taos, N.M., to piece together the film, a process that took almost a year, in part because he was using psychedelic drugs for editing inspiration.

When it was released, "The Last Movie" was such a crashing failure that it made Hopper unwanted in Hollywood for a decade. At the same time, his drug and alcohol use was increasing to the point where he was said to be consuming as much as a gallon of rum a day.

Shunned by the Hollywood studios, he found work in European films that were rarely seen in the United States. But, again, he made a remarkable comeback, starting with a memorable performance as a drugged-out journalist in Francis Ford Coppola's 1979 Vietnam War epic, "Apocalypse Now," a spectacularly long and troubled film to shoot. Hopper was drugged-out off camera, too, and his rambling chatter was worked into the final cut.

He went on to appear in several films in the early 1980s, including the well regarded "Rumblefish" and "The Osterman Weekend," as well as the campy "My Science Project" and "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2."

But alcohol and drugs continued to interfere with his work. Treatment at a detox clinic helped him stop drinking but he still used cocaine, and at one point he became so hallucinatory that he was committed to the psychiatric ward of a Los Angeles hospital.

Upon his release, Hopper joined Alcoholics Anonymous, quit drugs and launched yet another comeback. It began in 1986 when he played an alcoholic ex-basketball star in "Hoosiers," which brought him an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor.

His role as a wild druggie in "Blue Velvet," also in 1986, won him more acclaim, and years later the character wound up No. 36 on the AFI's list of top 50 movie villains.

He returned to directing, with "Colors," "The Hot Spot" and "Chasers."

From that point on, Hopper maintained a frantic work pace, appearing in many forgettable movies and a few memorable ones, including the 1994 hit "Speed," in which he played the maniacal plotter of a freeway disaster. In the 2000s, he was featured in the television series "Crash" and such films as "Elegy" and "Hell Ride."

"Work is fun to me," he told a reporter in 1991. "All those years of being an actor and a director and not being able to get a job — two weeks is too long to not know what my next job will be."

For years he lived in Los Angeles' bohemian beach community of Venice, in a house designed by acclaimed architect Frank Gehry.

In later years he picked up some income by becoming a pitchman for Ameriprise Financial, aiming ads at baby boomers looking ahead to retirement. His politics, like much of his life, were unpredictable. The old rebel contributed money to the Republican Party in recent years, but also voted for Democrat Barack Obama in 2008.

Dennis Lee Hopper was born in 1936, in Dodge City, Kan., and spent much of his youth on the nearby farm of his grandparents. He saw his first movie at 5 and became enthralled.

After moving to San Diego with his family, he played Shakespeare at the Old Globe Theater.

Scouted by the studios, Hopper was under contract to Columbia until he insulted the boss, Harry Cohn. From there he went to Warner Bros., where he made "Rebel Without a Cause" and "Giant" while in his late teens.

Later, he moved to New York to study at the Actors Studio, where Dean had learned his craft.

Hopper's first wife was Brooke Hayward, the daughter of actress Margaret Sullavan and agent Leland Hayward, and author of the best-selling memoir "Haywire." They had a daughter, Marin, before Hopper's drug-induced violence led to divorce after eight years.

His second marriage, to singer-actress Michelle Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas, lasted only eight days.

A union with actress Daria Halprin also ended in divorce after they had a daughter, Ruthana. Hopper and his fourth wife, dancer Katherine LaNasa, had a son, Henry, before divorcing.

He married his fifth wife, Victoria Duffy, who was 32 years his junior, in 1996, and they had a daughter, Galen Grier.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 30, 2010, 06:08:14 AM
That's a hard one.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 03, 2010, 12:51:18 PM
Man, everyone's being taken by the Rapture...

Quote
Geez, more sad news: Golden Girls star Rue McClanahan died early this morning of a stroke. She was 76 and surrounded by family. "She went in peace," says her manager. McClanahan is the third  Golden Girl to pass away in just under two years, so take care of yourself, Betty.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 07, 2010, 08:07:01 AM
Quote
David Markson, R.I.P.

One of America's greatest writers has passed on, and even though I shouldn't have been surprised - he was 82 years old and not in the greatest of health the last few years - I am. Gutted, actually. And based on the reaction on Twitter and various blogs, I'm far from the only one. In a way, David Markson needed the Internet, or more accurately, vice versa, to find his rightful place in the literary world. Quotation approprations, short declarative sentences, quick bursts with acres of thought, meditation on artists and writers at work, and a tremendous study of consciousness marked Markson's output since WITTGENSTEIN'S MISTRESS (1988) opened with the phrase "In the beginning, sometimes I left messages in the street." And as our collective attention spans decreased and dovetailed from mass-market pursuits, there was Markson to clue us in to something greater, more amorphous perhaps, but something that pinged the outer reaches of what he termed "seminonfictional semi-fictions."

http://www.sarahweinman.com/confessions/2010/06/david-markson-rip.html
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 22, 2010, 12:06:13 PM
Well...he died a few months ago, actually.  But we're going to get a front row seat for the next three episodes of Deadliest Catch.

Quote
Captain Phil Harris, the star of Discovery’s Deadliest Catch, died this past February, two weeks after having a stroke onboard his ship. Starting tonight, and for the next three episodes, Deadliest Catch will chronicle his death. In the Times today, the show’s producers, as well as Harris’s son, explain that the episodes are tastefully done, and that Harris would have approved. As evidence they share this very hard-core story: “Several days after the stroke, when Captain Harris awoke from a medically induced coma and was still unable to speak, he wrote a note to [cameraman and friend] Mr. Stanley that doubled as approval for the producers to stay at the hospital. 'Keep filming,' the note said, according to Mr. Stanley and Josh Harris. 'There has to be an end to this story.'” You do what the guy who cannot speak and just came out of a coma wants.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 28, 2010, 08:57:53 AM
Wow.  Robert Byrd.  Which means the end of anything good for West Virginia, eh?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 28, 2010, 09:32:43 AM
Yeah, who knows who'll replace him.

Still, he was 92 . . . That's a good run.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 13, 2010, 11:10:44 AM
Steinbrenner!  Heart attack!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 13, 2010, 11:44:27 AM
Repost from a FB friend: "Hell has no salary cap."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 13, 2010, 01:41:50 PM
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on July 13, 2010, 07:52:59 PM
Harvey Pekar! 

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 25, 2010, 11:06:48 AM
Satoshi Kon

Quote
Yesterday, news of master Japanese animator Satoshi Kon's death started circulating wildly. It came as a shock because, first, Kon was only 47 years old and, secondly, because nobody could confirm what was then thought to be a rumor. The news started after two people had mentioned Kon's passing, though those two people are trustworthy members of the anime industry: the President of Madhouse Studios (Mindgame) and one of the founding members of Gainax (Neon Genesis Evangelion). Now it has been confirmed that Kon has passed away. He died of cancer.

I'm still getting over this news, honestly. Kon was a modern luminary. His work was consistently dazzling: Perfect Blue, Millennium Actress, Tokyo Godfathers, Paranoia Agent and Paprika are all triumphs of visual ingenuity and adult intelligence in a genre most still consider to be just for kids. Kon was the real deal and his films were all wonderful and strange. I'm saddened by the prospect of never being able to see a new Kon movie on the big screen again, because even if the Madhouse guys do finish The Dream Machine, Kon's latest project, post-humously, I suspect something will be missing. Kon was a very hands-on artist (he originally worked as a manga artist and apprenticed under Akira's Katsuhiro Otomo) and all of his work show a distinct personality at work. I don't think you can duplicate or pinch-hit for that kind of talent.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 14, 2010, 03:00:52 PM
Been reading about this guy today:

http://blastr.com/2010/09/mysterious-sci-fi-author.php

Quote
   
The New York Times just published a sad but fascinating story about F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre, a bizarre, secretive science fiction author who once tortured a neighbor, whose real name no one seems to know and who died in June when he deliberately set his books and papers on fire.

 "It was the bizarro death of a man who lived a bizarro life," said Andrew Porter, a Brooklyn writer who was among the first to announce Mr. MacIntyre's demise, on the sci-fi fan blog File 770. "What was his real name? Where was he born? No one knows. Froggy was weird, and his death is just as weird."

...

    "Froggy always presented himself as like an English clubman, an eccentric who might be a time traveler from the 19th century," Mr. Schweitzer, his friend and agent, said. "He was always meeting someone famous in some remote part of the world -- Mother Teresa, Idi Amin -- and you couldn't confirm or deny any of it."

    Take, for instance, his gloves, which he said he wore to hide his hands. "He claimed he had a hideous skin condition, but there was also the webbed-fingers story," Mr. Schweitzer said, noting that Mr. MacIntyre had told some people that webbed fingers were the origin of his nickname, and others that it derived from an obscene phrase his father called him. "Other times, he'd claim he had prosthetics," Mr. Schweitzer noted, "and then there was the story about having had his fingernails pulled out by Idi Amin's soldiers while working as a reporter in Africa."

    Even his name was manufactured and mysterious: Gwynplaine was the smiling but unhappy character in Victor Hugo's "The Man Who Laughs." He used other aliases -- Timothy C. Allen (taxes) and Paul G. Jeffery (passport) and Oleg V. Bredikhine (magazine subscriptions) -- but never revealed his birth name, though he often recited details of a Dickensian childhood.

    On his Web site and in correspondence, Mr. MacIntyre said he was born in Perthshire, Scotland, a twin, with some deformities. He claimed that his parents had wanted to give him up for mercy killing but instead shipped him off to an orphan labor camp in Australia, and that his mother later contacted him to ask if he would donate a kidney to his twin brother. Outraged, he refused.

...

    Mr. Schweitzer described Mr. MacIntyre's "public persona" as "basically a character he invented."

    "He was not an outright liar -- he was too good," Mr. Schweitzer said. "But there was nothing about him that you could confirm: not his name, his age, his nationality. Nobody even knew where he lived."

...

    The most sordid story neighbors told about Mr. MacIntyre involved Helene Lapointe, who lived across the hall and whom Mr. MacIntyre would pay to remove bags of garbage. On Sept. 10, 2000, according to Ms. Lapointe, Mr. MacIntyre grabbed her, duct-taped her to a chair and began torturing her and threatening her life.

    "He stripped me and buzz-shaved my head and then spray-painted me black -- my whole body," said Ms. Lapointe, who broke free and ran to a friend's house.

...

    Just before dying, he forwarded his copyrights and future royalties to one of his publishers and put out the word that he was extremely depressed and moving to Australia and might not be heard from again. He spoke of suffering from synesthesia, a neurological condition in which the senses are crossed, and said that simply touching certain objects could set off painful feelings.

...

    AFTERWARD, city officials and cleaning crews sifted through the contents of the apartment, which had been flattened into a charred, soggy, hip-high heap. There was a huge collection of esoteric science-fiction books and journals, personal correspondence and drawers full of rejection letters and notices of unpaid taxes. There were countless devices and literature suggesting an encyclopedic array of sexual deviancy.

gwynplaine-apartment.jpg

...

    Some fans rebutted the news in chat rooms, citing a mass e-mail Mr. MacIntyre had sent hours before the fire saying that he had decamped to Australia and let a friend house-sit his apartment -- which seems to have been a ruse.

    The medical examiner's office has not officially confirmed the identity of the man who burned to death that day in Apartment C-9. The corpse is "not visually identifiable, from the fire," and there were no dental or other X-rays to help identify the body, said Ellen Borakove, a spokeswoman for the office.

    The body has remained unclaimed for months, but last Wednesday, Ms. Borakove said that "a relative was recently located, and DNA testing is being conducted to positively identify" the body. She would not say whom, citing privacy policies.

Here's a look at Gwynplaine's writing career from an obituary published by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America:

    Froggy, as he was often known, wrote short fiction for magazines such as Weird Tales Analog, Asimov's Science Fiction, Amazing Stories, Absolute Magnitude and Interzone. While primarily known as a short-fiction writer, he also had a wide-ranging career as a novelist, though much of that was as a ghost writer, including at least one Tom Swift novel, The DNA Disaster.

    His own novel, The Woman Between the Worlds is a science-fiction that Library Journal called, "Wildly comic, darkly horrific, and surprisingly bittersweet, this quirky novel has a place in most sf and fantasy collections." It is set in 1898 in London and is narrated by a tattoo artist with a highly unusual client -- an invisible woman who wants a full-body tattoo.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 27, 2010, 04:58:42 PM
Ellison predicts his demise!


Quote
If you've been hoping for a chance to see Harlan Ellison in person, you'd better act fast—the legendary writer has announced he'll be making his final convention appearance at MadCon 2010, which begins tomorrow in Madison, Wis. As for WHY this will be the writer's final con appearance, well, we'd better let him speak for himself.

"The truth of what's going on here is that I'm dying," Ellison told The Daily Page. "I began to sense it back in January. By that time, I had agreed to do the convention. And I said, I can make it. I can make it.'"

There'd been some doubt as to whether Ellison would be appearing due to his health, but as of press time, it looks like he'll be coming—and that there's no question he won't answer.

"This is gonna be the biggest f--king science-fiction convention ever," Ellison said, "because no con has ever had a guest of honor drop dead while performing for the g-ddamn audience. The only comparison is the death of Patrick Troughton, at a Doctor Who convention. And I don't think he was even onstage."

While we hope the prediction of his imminent demise is more hyperbole than promise (we love you, Harlan!), we guarantee that if you can make it to Madison, you'll witness a performance more than worth your effort.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on September 28, 2010, 08:41:36 AM
This thread is really depressing.  Especially when you read 6 months worth at a shot.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 28, 2010, 01:26:26 PM
Quote
The editor who helped created the signature look of Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill and Inglourious Basterds has died in Los Angeles.

Sally Menke, 56, who worked on all of Quentin Tarantino's features as well as Oliver Stone's Heaven and Earth and Lee Tamahori's Mulholland Falls, was found in Beachwood Canyon in the Hollywood Hills this morning.

Menke was best known as part of Tarantino's regular post-production team, having been hired to edit his first feature. She told the Observer last year: "He sent me this script for a thing called Reservoir Dogs and I just thought it was amazing."

She went on to forge a strong creative relationship with the director, describing him as "encyclopaedic, passionate, electrifying".

Reports suggest that Menke may have been overcome by hot weather while out hiking with her dog, but the cause of death has not yet been established. Her most recent credit was a low-budget thriller called Peacock, directed by first-timer Michael Lander.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on September 28, 2010, 05:39:01 PM
Quote
The editor who helped created the signature look of Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill and Inglourious Basterds has died in Los Angeles.

Sally Menke, 56, who worked on all of Quentin Tarantino's features as well as Oliver Stone's Heaven and Earth and Lee Tamahori's Mulholland Falls, was found in Beachwood Canyon in the Hollywood Hills this morning.

Menke was best known as part of Tarantino's regular post-production team, having been hired to edit his first feature. She told the Observer last year: "He sent me this script for a thing called Reservoir Dogs and I just thought it was amazing."

She went on to forge a strong creative relationship with the director, describing him as "encyclopaedic, passionate, electrifying".

Reports suggest that Menke may have been overcome by hot weather while out hiking with her dog, but the cause of death has not yet been established. Her most recent credit was a low-budget thriller called Peacock, directed by first-timer Michael Lander.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 30, 2010, 10:04:32 AM
Quote
LAS VEGAS – The Clark County coroner says actor Tony Curtis has died.

Coroner Mike Murphy says Curtis died at 9:25 p.m. MDT Wednesday at his Las Vegas area home of a cardiac arrest.

Curtis, who had heart bypass surgery in 1994, began his acting career as a 1950s heartthrob but became a respected actor with such films as "The Defiant Ones" and "Sweet Smell of Success.

"The Defiant Ones" brought him an Oscar nomination in 1958 for his portrayal of a racist escaped convict handcuffed to a black escapee, Sidney Poitier. The following year, he co-starred in one of the most acclaimed film comedies ever, Billy Wilder's "Some Like It Hot."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on October 01, 2010, 11:29:27 AM
Greg Geraldo died, too!   He was a comedian... not sure if he was any good or not, but I knew him as one of the judges on Last Comic Standing.  Really weird.  He OD'd at a party on pills.  He was also scheduled to speak at some addiction conference or something this weekend.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 06, 2010, 10:40:17 AM
This made me gasp in horror. Man...this guy authored my youth.

Quote
Stephen J. Cannell passes away

The guy was one of the powerhouse in the TV world and responsible for many 1980s pop culture milestones. He died due to complications associated with melanoma.
Cannell created or co-created "Baretta" and "The Rockford Files" in the 1970s then jumped into the Me Decade with "The Greatest American Hero," "Hardcastle and McCormick," "Riptide," "The A-Team," "Stingray," "Wiseguy," "21 Jump Street" among others.

In the 1990s, as the police-private dick adventure shows subsided, he had "The Commish," known as the Michael Chiklis show before "The Shield," and "Silk Stalkings."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on October 07, 2010, 09:48:43 PM
Wow, how'd this slip my radar?  Bob Schimmel died!  He was a fantastic comedian and battled cancer for a while right after I got his first album.  It actually turned into some of his best material.  I guess he passed away in early September after injuries sustained in a car accident... what a bummer.

Quote
Robert Schimmel, a comedian who specialized in taboo-breaking humor of the sexual and scatological variety, died on Friday at a Phoenix hospital, where he was being treated for injuries suffered in an Aug. 26 car accident. He was 60.

The death was confirmed by his manager, Lee Kernis of Brillstein Entertainment Partners.

Mr. Schimmel, who was a frequent contributor to Howard Stern’s radio programs and whose stand-up work often appeared on cable, was known for his cool delivery of routines, some of which might have made Lenny Bruce blush and Rodney Dangerfield feel well-respected.

His observations were undeniably direct. They resonated deeply with audiences when he spoke of the trivialities of life, like his distaste for using airport bathrooms. He incorporated his health problems, other hardships and personal shortcomings, including two troubled marriages, into the act.

“Robert was always the butt of his own joke,” Mr. Kernis said. “When he would talk about the failings of his marriages, his relationships or having kids, he always made the joke about his inability to ever win at the end.”

Describing the circumstances of a mild heart attack he suffered in 2000, for example, Mr. Schimmel said, “You know you’re out of shape when you have a heart attack when you’re watching television.”

Robert Schimmel was born in the Bronx on Jan. 16, 1950, one of three children of Otto and Betty Schimmel. After service in the Air Force — during which he contracted hepatitis C from a blood transfusion — he worked as a stereo salesman in Phoenix. Around 1980, while visiting his sister, Sandy, in Los Angeles, he went on stage at the Improv comedy club on an amateur night and was immediately offered a slot by Budd Friedman, the club’s founder, if he would relocate.

Mr. Schimmel quit his job and packed up his two young children and his first wife, Vicki, whom he had married in 1977. When he drove his family past the club to show them where he would be working, as the joke goes, he saw only its smoldering remains — it had burned down the night before.

Mr. Schimmel got a hand from Mr. Dangerfield, who appreciated his self-deprecating humor and invited him to appear on an HBO special. He later appeared on his own Showtime and HBO specials.

Fox offered Mr. Schimmel a development deal for a comedy series, but right after it was picked up in 2000, Mr. Schimmel received a diagnosis of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which required lengthy treatments. He wrote about the experience in a book, “Cancer on $5 a Day (Chemo Not Included),” published in 2008. In January, while appearing on Mr. Stern’s program, Mr. Schimmel disclosed that he had cirrhosis as a result of the lymphoma treatments.

In addition to his father and sister, Mr. Schimmel is survived by a brother, Jeffrey, and his second wife, Melissa, with whom he was in the process of a divorce. He is also survived by three children from his first marriage, Jessica, Aliyah and Jacob (a fourth child, Derek, died of cancer as a child), and two sons from his second marriage, Max and Sam.

His daughter Aliyah was driving the car that was involved in the accident, Mr. Kernis said. Both she and one of Mr. Schimmel’s young sons, who was also a passenger, were expected to recover, he added.

Reviewing Mr. Schimmel’s debut album in The New York Times in 1996, Ken Tucker wrote that “Mr. Schimmel isn’t so much angry as he is resigned — to the stupidity and hypocrisy of people and to his own inability to repair the same flaws in himself.”




Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 13, 2010, 06:16:27 PM
Big DC news:

Quote
Carla Cohen, 74, the co-owner of local bookselling institution Politics and Prose, died this morning after a long battle with cancer.

Cohen had been ailing for months, so her death was not unexpected: A lengthy obit appeared on the bookstore's home page within hours of her 8 a.m. death. A report in the Washington Post soon followed. But there are no plans as yet for an in-store event to commemorate Cohen's life, says Tracey Filar Atwood, a store general manager.

It's a good bet that any such event would draw a crowd both large and devoted—even by the standards of P&P, where author events regularly draw crowds of enthusiasts. Politics and Prose, co-owned by Cohen and Barbara Meade, commands a fierce loyalty among a certain stratum of Washington's reading elite. Where other independent bookstores vanished over the past decade in the face of competition from national chains and online booksellers, P&P retained its position because it did double-duty as a regular bookseller and as a gathering place for the well-read locals who turn up for its crowded calendar of book-signings (on this week's docket: Howard Dean, Condoleezza Rice, and Michele Norris) or join one of the many book-clubs that meet in the store.

But the encomia would also likely come wrapped in a certain anxiety: News broke in June that Cohen and Meade had put the store up for sale. Cohen's illness made P&P sources especially reticent about discussing the sale or possible buyers. With her death, the process could gain some steam. The store has recently seen its local market position challenged by comparative newcomers like Busboys and Poets, which boasts a central location and a set-up that's better suited to event-driven bookselling. In the event of a sale, loyalists will likely scrutinize any new owners to make sure they reflect Cohen's values.

New owners, for their part, would do well to promise never-ending fealty to Cohen's legacy. After all, the largest chunk of their investment in the store will not come because its inventory is that large or its Connecticut Avenue storefront is that appealing. It'll involve buying access to the network of loyal customers Cohen and Meade painstakingly developed.

Which, in the end, is the best of all tributes to Carla Cohen.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 16, 2010, 08:10:26 PM
June Cleaver -- dead at the age of 572.

Quote
Barbara Billingsley, the mom on Leave it to Beaver, died at age 94 today in Santa Monica. "America's favorite mother is now gone. I feel very fortunate to have been her 'son,'" actor Tony Dow, who played Wally Cleaver, said in a statement. "We were wonderful friends and I will miss her very much. My deepest sympathies to her sons, Glenn and Drew, and her entire family."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 19, 2010, 03:49:13 PM
Quote
TMZ  is reporting that actor Tom Bosley has died at his home in Palm Springs. Bosley is best known for playing the head of the Cunningham household on Happy Days, but he's got a long list of credits that includes Murder, She Wrote, Father Dowling Mysteries, a Broadway stint in Beauty and the Beast, and innumerable television commercials. He was 83 years old and still working right up to the end: His last credit was in this year's Jennifer Lopez comedy The Back-Up Plan.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on October 19, 2010, 07:28:03 PM
I wonder if they'll bury him in a Hefty bag.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on October 19, 2010, 08:18:31 PM
Hefty! Hefty! Hefty! (wimpy, wimpy, wimpy)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 11, 2010, 09:11:08 AM
Quote
Italian film producer Dino De Laurentiis dies

ROME (Reuters) – Oscar-winning Italian film producer Dino De Laurentiis, who brought to the big screen nearly 500 films including "Serpico," "Three Days of the Condor" and "King Kong," died in Los Angeles aged 91, Italian media said on Thursday.

De Laurentiis produced several Italian classics in collaboration, including Federico Fellini's "La Strada," for which he won an Oscar in 1957.

He moved to the United States in the 1970s after the failure of his film studios in Rome, and turned to a string of big international productions, including a few flops.

He was behind the legendary King Kong remake of 1976, the killer whale film "Orca," several adaptations of Stephen King's novels, and most recently "Hannibal," the sequel to "The Silence of the Lambs."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 23, 2010, 04:36:20 PM
Quote
Actress Ingrid Pitt, dubbed Hammer Films' "Queen of Horror", has die,her daughter said. She was 73. The Polish-born star collapsed in London last week while on her way to an event hosted by members of her fan club. Her daughter Steffanie Pitt said she was "a fantastic woman". Pitt was best known as a seductive screen siren in a string of British horror films including The Vampire Lovers and Countess Dracula. She also had a minor part in the 1973 cult classic The Wicker Man. Steffanie Pitt said: "She passed away this morning. It was heart trouble. She had a couple of bad years, health-wise, but she had fought through. Anyone who knew my mother would say she was incredibly feisty and determined to make a good fist of everything she wanted to do." She will be remembered forever.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 23, 2010, 11:58:25 PM
That's sad . . .
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on November 28, 2010, 10:24:07 PM
Leslie Nielsen!

Surely, you can't be serious!

I am serious, and don't call me Shirley.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on November 28, 2010, 10:37:55 PM
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 29, 2010, 12:03:31 AM
Leslie Nielsen!

Surely, you can't be serious!

I am serious, and don't call me Shirley.

Oh man... That kind of hits me hard.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 29, 2010, 12:52:29 AM
Oh man. That one does hit close to home.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 29, 2010, 05:02:12 PM
Oof . . . Please let this be the third of the infamous "death triumvirates."

Quote
'Empire Strikes Back' director Irvin Kershner dies



Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 29, 2010, 05:36:25 PM
Oof . . . Please let this be the third of the infamous "death triumvirates."

Quote
'Empire Strikes Back' director Irvin Kershner dies


It's shocking that all these people are getting old.  I'll always think of Nielsen circa 1988...



Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on November 29, 2010, 10:27:34 PM
Leslie was one of those guys who seemed perpetually old.  Like, he was old when I discovered him as a kid and he just sort of never seemed to age beyond that point.  I love almost all of his movies and thankfully there are enough of them floating around that he'll always be able to make us laugh.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 07, 2010, 06:14:02 PM
Elizabeth Edwards!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on December 07, 2010, 10:02:59 PM
but my newspaper this morning said she had weeks to live! 

It's going to be a real uphill battle getting that motivational speaking career going now, Jon.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 16, 2010, 03:43:39 PM
Blake Edwards:

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/postmortem/2010/12/blake-edwards-dies-at-88-direc.html
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 16, 2010, 05:41:52 PM
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 18, 2010, 06:37:07 PM
Mike Donovan's mom!

Makes me want to watch V again...


Quote
Neva Patterson Dies

Neva Patterson, who played an ambitious mother in NBC’s science-fiction movie V and its sequel, the miniseries V: The Final Battle, died December 14 at the age of 90:

    Fan mail and unexpected visitors continued to show up at her door, her family said. Last month, five “V” fans from France brought gifts and a request for her autograph.

Her best-known role was playing Cary Grant’s fiancée in the 1957 movie An Affair to Remember.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 21, 2010, 03:45:30 PM
Quote
Steve Landesberg, best known for his role as a cerebral detective on the TV sitcom "Barney Miller," has died of cancer, his agent said. He was 65.

"Steve was a true 'Gentleman,' " Landesberg's agent Jeffrey Leavitt said late Monday, shortly after the actor's death. "Working with Steve was an honor both personally and professionally. ... He will be missed."

Landesberg played with deadpan delivery Detective Arthur Dietrich on "Barney Miller," an often infuriatingly intellectual member of a New York City police station in Greenwich Village, who toyed with those who crossed his path in the precinct. The series ran from 1975 to 1982.

In addition to his stint on the sitcom, Landesberg made guest appearances on a number of shows, including "Saturday Night Live," "The Golden Girls" and "Law & Order." He also appeared in the 2008 movie "Forgetting Sarah Marshall."

He is credited with the quote "Honesty is the best policy, but insanity is a better defense," according to WorldofQuotes.com.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 27, 2010, 09:18:46 AM
Quote
Teena Marie, known as 'Ivory Queen of Soul,' dies

The self-proclaimed "Ivory Queen of Soul," whose many classic hits included "Lovergirl," Square Biz" and the scorching duet "Fire and Desire" with mentor Rick James, was found dead in her Pasadena home on Sunday at the age of 54. Authorities said her death appeared to be of natural causes.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 03, 2011, 08:31:31 AM
Gosh...

Quote
Pete Postlethwaite, famously dubbed the "best actor in the world" by Steven Spielberg and who starred in films such as 'Inception' and 'The Usual Suspects,' has died after a lengthy battle with cancer. The respected British star was 64.

Spokesman and friend Andrew Richardson told the UK press that Postlethwaite died in a hospital in Shropshire, in western England, on Sunday. Shortly before his death he publicly thanked the hospital staff in the local newspaper for their "wonderful" treatment and care during his illness.

The unmistakeably gritty actor earned an Oscar nomination for his role in 1993's 'In the Name of the Father' and worked steadily through the years in big Hollywood fare such as 'The Town,' 'Romeo + Juliet,' and the Spielberg hits 'Amistad' and 'The Lost World: Jurassic Park.'

He began his acting career in the British theatre after initially planning to be a priest. In the 1980s and early 1990's, Postlethwaite worked a great deal in British television.

Along the way, the actor made a wealth of friends. Bill Nighy, who performed with Postlethwaite in the 1970s, called him "a rare and remarkable man," adding in comments to the BBC that he was "honored by his friendship -- he is irreplaceable."

In 1993 he starred as Daniel Day-Lewis' father, Giuseppe Conlon, in 'In The Name of the Father,' a role that earned him an Oscar nomination.

He received an OBE (Order of the British Empire) in 2004 along with many other honors for his long career in movies, theater, and television.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 03, 2011, 09:11:52 AM
Well shit. That sucks.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 03, 2011, 03:24:35 PM
Quote
Actress Anne Francis, who was the love interest in the 1950s science-fiction classic "Forbidden Planet" and later was sexy private eye in "Honey West" on TV, has died at age 80.

Francis died Sunday at a Santa Barbara nursing home, said Bill Guntle, a funeral director McDermott-Crockett & Associates Mortuary in Santa Barbara.

Francis, who had surgery and chemotherapy after being diagnosed with lung cancer in 2007, died of complications of pancreatic cancer, her daughter, Jane Uemura, told the Los Angeles Times.

Francis, a stunningly beautiful blonde with a prominent beauty mark, appeared opposite such stars as Spencer Tracy, Paul Newman, Robert Taylor and Glenn Ford in some of the most popular films of the 1950s. But "Forbidden Planet" and "Honey West" made her reputation.

"Forbidden Planet" was hailed in Leonard Maltin's "2006 Movie Guide" as "one of the most ambitious and intelligent films of its genre."

A science-fiction retelling of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," the 1956 film had Leslie Nielsen and other space travelers visiting a planet where expatriate scientist Walter Pidgeon, his daughter (Francis) and their helper, Robby the Robot, built a settlement.

Before filming began, the actors held a meeting and agreed "to be as serious about this film as we could be," Francis said in a 1999 interview.

"We could have hammed it up, but we wanted to be as sincere as we could," she said.

In "Honey West," which aired from 1965 to 1966, Francis' private detective character — who kept a pet ocelot, a wildcat — was a female James Bond: sexy, stylish and as good with martial arts as she was with a gun.

She was nominated for an Emmy for the role, which lasted 30 episodes.

"A lot of people speak to me about Honey West," Francis recalled. "The character made young women think there was more they could reach for. It encouraged a lot of people."

After a childhood career in New York radio and television and on the Broadway stage, Francis arrived in Hollywood when she landed a movie contract at MGM. She later went to 20th Century-Fox, then returned to MGM, and the two big studios afforded her the chance to act opposite the biggest male stars of the day.

In "Blackboard Jungle," the landmark 1955 film about an idealistic teacher (Ford) in a violent city school, Francis played his pregnant wife who is targeted for harassment by one of his students.

Among her other films: "Bad Day at Black Rock" with Tracy and Robert Ryan, "Rogue Cop" with Taylor, "The Rack" with Newman, "A Lion Is in the Streets" with James Cagney, and "Hook, Line and Sinker" opposite Jerry Lewis.

When her movie career declined, Francis became active in television, appearing in dozens of series, including "Mission Impossible," "The Virginian," "My Three Sons," "Ironside," "Gunsmoke," "The Twilight Zone," "Charlie's Angels," "The Golden Girls," "Home Improvement" and "Nash Bridges."

Her name was Ann Marvak when she was born Sept. 16, 1930, in Ossining, N.Y.

By age 5 she was working as a model, and by 11 she was appearing on daytime radio serials, winning the nickname the Little Queen of Soap Operas. She also had some small roles on Broadway.

After her first MGM contract, during which she attended studio school with Elizabeth Taylor, Jane Powell and Natalie Wood, she returned to New York. There, she took part in television's Golden Age, acting in such acclaimed dramatic series as "Studio One" and "U.S. Steel Hour" before returning to Hollywood.

Francis' early marriage to actor Bam Price ended in divorce.

In addition to Jane, Francis and her second husband, Robert Abeloff, had another daughter, Maggie, before divorcing. She also is survived by a grandson.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 11, 2011, 08:54:25 AM
Quote
Dick Winters dies; WWII hero commanded 'Band of Brothers'
By T. Rees Shapiro
The full obituary for Maj. Richard "Dick" Winters can be viewed here.

Dick Winters, a decorated Army officer whose World War II service was recounted in the best-selling book and HBO mini-series "Band of Brothers," died Jan. 2. News reports listed his age at 92.

Based on the 1992 book by historian Stephen E. Ambrose, the HBO mini-series came out in 2001 and was produced by Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg.

The story follows the tragedies and triumphs of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 2nd Battalion, E Company.

To Mr. Winters, these citizen-soldiers came to be known as the men of Easy Company -- paratroopers who jumped into combat on June 6, 1944 above Normandy, France.

According to Ambrose's account, Easy Company suffered 150 percent casualties throughout the war.

One of the soldiers who served in Easy Company, David Webster, once wrote that among his colleagues the Purple Heart "was not a decoration but a badge of office."

Mr. Winters, who separated from the Army at the rank of major, and his men fought together through D-Day and the Battle of the Bulge and later occupied Adolf Hitler's mountainside retreat, the Eagle's Nest, near Berchtesgaden.

A charismatic officer who led by example, Mr. Winters received the Distinguished Service Cross, the country's second highest decoration for valor, while conducting combat operations on D-Day.

Mr. Winters led a small group of men on a raid of German cannon emplacements near Utah beach on Normandy's coastline.

While taking out the heavily fortified bunker, Mr. Winters and his men killed 15 German soldiers and took 12 more as prisoners, helping to save countless American lives from the withering cannon fire.

Later in the war, one of Mr. Winters's soldiers, Floyd Talbert, wrote a letter to the officer from a hospital in Indiana expressing gratitude for his loyalty and leadership.

"You are loved and will never be forgotten by any soldier that ever served under you," Talbert wrote to Mr. Winters in 1945. "I would follow you into hell."

For Mr. Winters, his soldiers were his Band of Brothers and their experiences together in the war "created a bond between the men of E company that will last forever."

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 12, 2011, 12:15:28 PM
Quote
Peter Yates (1929-2010)
Peter Yates, British-born film director who worked mostly in Hollywood, died Sunday, aged 81. Movies included the 1983 science fantasy Krull.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 12, 2011, 12:16:05 PM
Quote
David Nelson, the last remaining cast member of the classic TV show The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet, passed away on Tuesday after a long bout with colon cancer. Nelson, who starred with his mother, father, and brother on the hit show, was 74. In addition to his role on Ozzie & Harriet, Nelson also directed several episodes of the show, and had parts in 1957's Peyton Place and 1959's The Big Circus. In 2006, he was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on January 12, 2011, 11:40:00 PM
it's funny how no one is ever described as having a "short bout" with cancer, even if that's, in fact, what happened.  "Dick Caruthers died after a TKO from cancer in round 2.  Everyone, including the Las Vegas bookies, were disappointed that he didn't last longer."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 16, 2011, 06:38:39 PM
Quote
British actress Susannah York, one of the leading stars of British and Hollywood films in the late 1960s and early 1970s, has died in London. She was 72.

York received an Oscar nomination in 1970 for her role in "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" and also appeared in the classic "A Man For All Seasons" before going on to play Christopher Reeve's biological mother in the Superman series of movies.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 17, 2011, 10:16:33 AM
Oh, wow.  Now that's a bit young...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 24, 2011, 11:40:17 AM
Quote
Jack LaLanne dies; fitness guru helped shepherd in an era of health-consciousness

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/story/2011/01/24/ST2011012401518.html?sid=ST2011012401518
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 01, 2011, 01:59:57 PM
John Barry:


Quote
Few composers have built as illustrious a resume as John Barry, dead at 77, who won four Oscars over the course of his 40-odd-year career. While he might've gotten accolades for scores like Dances With Wolves, Out of Africa and Body Heat, his work on such films as Black Hole, King Kong and various Bond flicks are still a wonder to behold.


Sci-Fi Wire selected some of the more...eccentric film scores:

http://blastr.com/2011/01/celebrate-late-composer-j.php
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 03, 2011, 03:15:08 PM
Quote
'Last Tango in Paris' star Maria Schneider dies

PARIS - Maria Schneider, the French actress who was Marlon Brando 's young co-star in the steamy 1972 film "Last Tango in Paris," has died, her talent agency said. She was 58.

A representative of the Act 1 agency said Schneider died in Paris on Thursday "following a long illness," but declined to provide details.

Schneider was 19 when she starred opposite Marlon Brando in Bernardo Bertolucci's racy "Last Tango in Paris." In it, she played a young Parisian woman who takes up with a middle-aged American businessman, played by Brando.

Throughout her career, Schneider appeared in more than two dozen films, most of them French. The last movie she appeared in, "The Key," by director Guillaume Nicloux, came out in 2007.

The Act 1 representative said she was not aware of funeral plans. She asked not to be named in accordance with her agency's policy.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 03, 2011, 06:37:54 PM
A deathwatch for Ilya Salkind:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilya_Salkind

Quote
On February 2, 2011, Salkind's long-time business partner filed a "Missing Person Report" with Mexican authorities. On January 30, 2011, Salkind left his cell phone at his Mexico City vacation home and told his staff that he was going to run errands. He has not been heard from since
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 03, 2011, 06:56:24 PM
Creepy.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on February 04, 2011, 01:43:47 PM
How big do you think the Mexico City "missing persons report" filing cabinet is?  A city block?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 04, 2011, 01:56:59 PM
How big do you think the Mexico City "missing persons report" filing cabinet is?  A city block?

I don't know, gringo. Maybe $200 will help us look for your friend....maybe not.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 05, 2011, 01:20:09 PM
A deathwatch for Ilya Salkind:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilya_Salkind

On February 2, 2011, Salkind's long-time business partner filed a "Missing Person Report" with Mexican authorities. On January 30, 2011, Salkind left his cell phone at his Mexico City vacation home and told his staff that he was going to run errands. He has not been heard from since


He lives!


Quote
'Superman' producer at hospital near Mexico City (AP)

CUERNAVACA, Mexico - A health official in Mexico says the producer of the Superman films of the 1970s and '80s is recovering at a hospital after being admitted in a state of disorientation and suffering facial and head injuries.

Ilya Salkind had been staying at a home near Mexico City and his friends reported him missing earlier this week.

Arturo Torres of the Morelos state medical office said Friday that the 63-year-old Salkind didn't have identification when he was admitted Sunday at a hospital in Cuernavaca.

Morelos Attorney General Pedro Luis Benitez Velez says Salkind was hurt while in Tepoztlan, a town about 55 miles south of Mexico City. It was unclear how he was injured.

Salkind produced "Superman" in 1978 and two sequels.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 05, 2011, 07:37:26 PM
Quote
Probably the single best "bad girl" named actress in the history of badass femme fatale history...   a genuine super-woman of bust-tackular proportions...  TURA SATANA, who became an immortal in Russ Meyer's FASTER PUSSYCAT! KILL! KILL!, has jumped upon her winged black horse and taken into the sky as the eternal badass Valkyrie she has been waiting to transform into.   

TURA SATANA wasn't a manish woman.   She was a woman with a roar, a growl and claws.   She was endowed with awesome breasts that she placed inside of bullet bras and low cut tight clingy tops.  She had an ass that swung like Vincent Price's pendulum.   BLACK was her color - and she suffered no man she couldn't toss 12 feet.   She drove pedal to the metal and thrilled as the overpowered engine shot vibrations throughout her awesome body.    TURA SATANA was a powerful woman.   A presence that could not be missed.   One that cried out to be announced.   

I once got to partake in an Alamo Drafthouse event for FASTER PUSSYCAT! KILL! KILL! at a racetrack outside of Austin, with the 3 lead women of Russ' most famous film.   They rode around the track in race cars...   They hooted and hollared and roared into the night.   Tura would bruise your chest with her boob when taking photos and she had fire and brimstone in her eyes.

TURA SATANA is dead.   Something needs to be killed in her honor.   I suggest a body builder.   With a karate chop.   That's a fitting tribute.   And women, on this day, forever more.   Low cut tops only...  all black, heavy mascara - and be fierce!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 08, 2011, 08:51:14 AM
Oh, sad one...

http://suvudu.com/2011/02/rip-brian-jacques.html

Quote
literature has lost one of its shining lights today: Brian Jacques, famous for his Redwall series, is dead at age 71. Numerous sources report the cause of death as heart attack.

Jacques was by all accounts a charming and personable fellow, fond of children, both his own and the legions of young people who adored his books. A former truck driver, he was inspired to write his first Redwall tale for the enjoyment of students he met while delivering milk at the Royal Wavertree School for the Blind. Jacques’ stories of brave mice, cunning rats and other animals found a worldwide audience. At the time of his death, the Redwall series had expanded to 22 books.

An entire generation has grown to adulthood reading the Redwall books, some of whom have introduced the series to their own children. Jacques may have passed on, but he will be remembered forever as a classic author of children’s literature alongside greats like J.M. Barrie, C.S. Lewis and Kenneth Grahame.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 15, 2011, 10:29:09 AM
Quote
Kenneth Mars, a comic actor who specialized in playing foreign characters in comedies ranging from "The Producers" and "Young Frankenstein" to "Malcolm in the Middle," has died.

Mars, 75, died Saturday (Feb. 12) at his home in Granada Hills, Calif., after suffering from pancreatic cancer, the AP reports.

Mars was born in Chicago in 1936, but he gained his widest fame for playing European characters in a pair of Mel Brooks movies. He played the crazy Nazi playwright Franz Liebkind in "The Producers" (he's in the center of the picture above with co-stars Gene Wilder and Zero Mostel) and the incomprehensible Inspector Kemp in "Young Frankenstein."

Mars' career spanned more than 45 years and included roles in movies including "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," "Fletch," "What's Up, Doc?" and "Radio Days." He appeared in dozens of TV shows -- most recently a recurring part on "Malcolm in the Middle" as dude ranch owner Otto -- and did extensive voice-over work, including in "The Little Mermaid," where he played King Triton.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 15, 2011, 11:02:27 AM
Wow... I thought he was already dead!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 15, 2011, 11:10:22 AM
That's what this thread has become really.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 15, 2011, 12:05:44 PM
That's because all these actors from 1907 are starting to die after living 100 years in a secluded vampire villa overlooking the Pacific Ocean like Hearst.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 17, 2011, 03:26:15 PM
Quote
Joanne Siegel Dies
Joanne Siegel, the widow of Superman co-creator Jerry Siegel and inspiration for the Lois Lane character, passed away February 14 at age 93 reports Comics Beat.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 23, 2011, 10:26:14 AM
Wow...sad, sad day. The Brigadier is dead! One of the Who companions I loved the most when I was growing up. He was the uber-companion. Instead of stumbling after the Doctor, he was essentially the Doctor's boss when he was Earthbound in the Pertwee years, and the brig and the Doctor were often at odds. Most of the time, the brig's solution was to blow shit up. And frequently he did so against the Doctor's wishes. It was a great bit of chemistry that sort of stepped beyond the confines of an otherwise predictable and clumsy period in the show's history.  He made even the worst episodes (Hello Ambassadors of Death and Invasion of th Dinosaurs) watchable.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/doctorwho/dw/news/bulletin_110223_01

Quote
Nicholas Courtney
23rd Feb 2011

It's with enormous sadness we report that following a short illness, Nicholas Courtney - one of the greats of Doctor Who - has peacefully passed away, aged 81.
Nicholas was best known for his portrayal of Brigadier Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, a character he first played in the 1968 story, The Web of Fear. He returned several months later in The Invasion and became a regular character in 1970, forming a memorable partnership with Jon Pertwee, the Third Doctor.

From the mid-70s onwards he continued to appear sporadically, always bringing a touch of magic and charm to the stories he starred in. His final portrayal of 'the Brig' came in late 2008 in The Sarah Jane Adventures. In the two-part story, Enemy of the Bane, the old soldier he had played for so long was once again on hand to help save the world.

Nicholas Courtney first appeared in Doctor Who in the 1965 epic, The Daleks' Master Plan, playing Bret Vyon opposite the First Doctor, William Hartnell. Shortly after he got a call from director Douglas Camfield, offering him a new role in the show, playing Captain Knight. However, when the actor due to play Lethbridge-Stewart dropped out, Nicholas was offered that part. He was immediately attracted to the character and later said he was 'secretly delighted' to win the part. Over the course of his debut adventure he made the military man a charismatic and believable figure and throughout the following decades Nicholas would ensure the Brigadier remained one of the best-loved characters in Doctor Who.

We'll be running a full tribute to Nicholas Courtney very soon, but in the meantime we've a clip of Nicholas in action as the Brigadier, from the 1971 story, Terror of the Autons, showcasing the wonderful chemistry he shared with Jon Pertwee.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 01, 2011, 01:39:16 PM
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Former Hollywood actress and sex symbol Jane Russell has died at the age of 89.

The brunette was discovered by eccentric billionaire Howard Hughes, who cast her in his 1943 Western The Outlaw.

Some of her most memorable films include the The Paleface (1948) with Bob Hope, and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) with Marilyn Monroe.

She died on Monday at her home in California of a respiratory-related illness, her daughter-in-law confirmed.

"She always said I'm going to die in the saddle, I'm not going to sit at home and become an old woman. And that's exactly what she did, she died in the saddle," Etta Waterfield said, recounting that Russell had remained active in her local community until illness intervened in recent weeks.

Russell was a pin-up girl in the 1940s and 1950s, but her film career had faded by the 1960s.

"Why did I quit movies? Because I was getting too old! You couldn't go on acting in those years if you were an actress over 30," she said in an interview in 1999.

In 1971, she featured in the Broadway musical Company.

Later, she appeared in TV commercials promoting brassieres, including the 18-hour bra for Playtex.

Russell married three times and adopted three children.

After experiencing problems during the adoption process, she founded the World Adoption International Agency, which has helped organise the adoptions in the US of tens of thousands of children from overseas.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 01, 2011, 02:07:02 PM
The last WWI vet. Which makes me think of the recent Archer episode so I laughed at this.

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I knew it would happen, and with Frank Buckles' health issues the last several months, I knew he was near the end of his life, but even then, it is sad as we have lost our last living connection to that long-ago war. Frank Buckles, 110, died February 27th.

He is the last of our "Doughboys," the 4.7 million who fought in the war and had been active in the last years of his life in attempting to have a national memorial in Washington, DC.

He was born in Oklahoma and, even though just 16, made several attempts to join the military after the United States got into World War I, before finally convincing an army captain that he was of age.

After the war, he returned to Oklahoma and then lived in Canada before moving to New York City where he got into the shipping business. At the outbreak of World War II, he was in the Philippines and captured by the Japanese and spent the rest of the war in prison, even though he was a civilian.

I have been following Mr. Buckles a lot on my history blog at http://cootershistorything.blogspot.com.

Go to it and click on Frank Buckles' label.

My great uncle and both grandfathers were in World War I.

The End of a Great Generation. --RoadDog
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on March 01, 2011, 11:09:38 PM
i think we should have a GS Tontine!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 02, 2011, 07:42:44 AM
You know, that whole Archer episode was basically the same as a similar MASH episode where the colonel was the last of his group of WWI buddies. The prize was a bottle of brandy, and we had the same sort of meet-up with his other buddies.

One of the many, many episodes where MASH should have jumped the shark but didn't.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on March 12, 2011, 09:39:06 PM
I'm telling you, MASH 2012 is one of the few TV remakes that could be brilliant if handled correctly.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 16, 2011, 07:26:02 PM
It's 90s back up bandmates death week.

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G-Funk Legend Nate Dogg Dead at 41

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Ex-Alice in Chains Bassist Mike Starr Dead at 44

I was a big Alice in Chains fan in high school and college. [/dating myself] Mike Starr was awesome. Nate Dogg too, but I have the personal affinity for AIC.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 16, 2011, 08:17:13 PM
How refreshing to have dead people who weren't 189!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 17, 2011, 07:54:25 PM
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LONDON - Michael Gough, the British actor best known for playing Bruce Wayne's butler Alfred in a series of Batman movies, has died at age 94.

Gough appeared in more than 150 movies and television shows, including British science-fiction show "Doctor Who." He died of old age at home in England on Thursday, surrounded by family, his ex-wife Anneke Wills said through her agent.

Wills said in an obituary posted on the Doctor Who website: "As his body was deteriorating this week, he said that he wanted to hang on for St. Patrick's Day. And he did, just. In the end ... there is only love."

Gough remains best remembered for his role as Alfred Pennyworth in the Batman franchise, starring opposite Michael Keaton, Val Kilmer and George Clooney.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 17, 2011, 08:02:17 PM
Yeah. Came here to post that! Sad...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 23, 2011, 12:16:41 PM
Liz Taylor.

Filed under: "Thought she was already dead."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 26, 2011, 05:09:43 PM
Geraldine Ferraro!

Now I'm having 1984 flashbacks. She was a big deal for my family. Mom and my grandparents were pinning their hopes on no more Ray-Gun. Which, even as a 10 year old, made me go LOL.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 09, 2011, 01:24:07 PM
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Legendary director Sidney Lumet, who helmed 12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon, and Network, among other films, died Saturday morning at his home in Manhattan, as a result of lymphoma. He was 86. Lumet was born in Philadelphia and began his career in the entertainment industry as a stage actor. His career took off in 1953 when he began directing original plays for series on CBS and NBC. A four-time Oscar nominee, his last film was 2007's Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead. He is survived by his fourth wife, Mary Gimbel, a stepdaughter, a stepson, two daughters, and nine grandchildren. “While the goal of all movies is to entertain,” Lumet once wrote, “the kind of film in which I believe goes one step further. It compels the spectator to examine one facet or another of his own conscience. It stimulates thought and sets the mental juices flowing.”
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 19, 2011, 11:05:41 AM
Schaefer...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/william-donald-schaefer-89-maryland-governor-comptroller-baltimore-mayor/2010/09/21/AFUyPa1D_story.html?hpid=z1

One of the immortal political vampires whose been in office since 1799.

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William Donald Schaefer, who dominated Maryland politics as governor, state comptroller and Baltimore mayor with a trademark style that was impatient, autocratic and sometimes offensive, died Monday of undisclosed causes at a retirement center in Catonsville, Md. He was 89.

"Undisclosed causes" = he was starved of fresh blood like the vampire lovers in The Hunger.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 19, 2011, 05:23:43 PM
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Elisabeth Sladen has passed away at the age of 63.

The actress is best known for portraying Sarah Jane Smith in Doctor Who and The Sarah Jane Adventures. The cause of death is not yet clear.

Doctor Who Magazine tweeted: "With great sadness, DWM must report the loss of our beloved Sarah Jane, actress Elisabeth Sladen. The best of best friends. Too, too sad."

Doctor Who writer Paul Cornell said: "Very sorry to hear about Elisabeth Sladen, a great actor, special to everyone of my generation and a whole new one."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 19, 2011, 05:26:01 PM
Oh my god... That one really hits me. My beautiful Sarah Jane!

What the hell? 63?

edit: The Doctor Who blogs say that she was trying to quietly fight cancer.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on April 20, 2011, 12:25:35 AM
Schaefer...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/william-donald-schaefer-89-maryland-governor-comptroller-baltimore-mayor/2010/09/21/AFUyPa1D_story.html?hpid=z1

One of the immortal political vampires whose been in office since 1799.

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William Donald Schaefer, who dominated Maryland politics as governor, state comptroller and Baltimore mayor with a trademark style that was impatient, autocratic and sometimes offensive, died Monday of undisclosed causes at a retirement center in Catonsville, Md. He was 89.

"Undisclosed causes" = he was starved of fresh blood like the vampire lovers in The Hunger.

You don't say Inner Harbor without Willie Don.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 20, 2011, 01:38:14 PM
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Elisabeth Sladen has passed away at the age of 63.

The actress is best known for portraying Sarah Jane Smith in Doctor Who and The Sarah Jane Adventures. The cause of death is not yet clear.

Doctor Who Magazine tweeted: "With great sadness, DWM must report the loss of our beloved Sarah Jane, actress Elisabeth Sladen. The best of best friends. Too, too sad."

Doctor Who writer Paul Cornell said: "Very sorry to hear about Elisabeth Sladen, a great actor, special to everyone of my generation and a whole new one."

Tom Baker put up a lovely little tribute...


http://www.tom-baker.co.uk/pages/content/index.asp?PageID=159
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 03, 2011, 10:37:39 PM
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Mummified Body of Former Playmate Found in L.A. Home

LOS ANGELES -- The mummified body of a former Playboy playmate who once starred in the cult film "Attack of the 50-Foot Woman" was found in her Los Angeles home, police said Monday.

Yvette Vickers, 82, was discovered by a neighbor in an upstairs room of her home in Benedict Canyon on April 27.

She had not been seen for a long time and police believe she may have been dead for close to a year.

Neighbor Susan Savage said: "We've all been crying about this. Nobody should be left alone like that."

The official cause of death has not yet been determined but police do not suspect foul play.

Vickers, who appeared as the July 1959 playmate in Playboy magazine, featured in several B-grade films including "Attack of the 50-Foot Woman" and "Attack of the Giant Leeches."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 04, 2011, 07:00:54 AM
You missed the Dying Alone thread!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 21, 2011, 04:37:21 PM
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Macho Man Randy Savage -- one of the most famous wrestlers of all-time -- died today in a car accident in Tampa, Florida ... TMZ has learned.

TMZ spoke with Randy's brother, Lanny Poffo, who tells us the wrestling legend suffered a heart attack while he was behind the wheel around 10 AM ... and lost control of his vehicle.

Earlier this month, Savage celebrated his 1-year anniversary with his new wife Lynn.

Savage was 58.

Macho Man began wrestling in the WWF in 1985 and became a superstar with his trademark catchphrase "Ooooooh Yeaahhhhh."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on May 21, 2011, 10:43:38 PM
Snapping into a Slim Jim for you, Randy!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on May 22, 2011, 03:21:36 AM
this is a death that deserves more than just a passing quote.  here's to you, randy, the embodiment of seventies flash carried over into 80s obscene masculinity and early forays into alternative spokespeople!

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 22, 2011, 09:10:42 AM
That's how Qaddafi and Kim Jong Il see themselves, you know.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on May 25, 2011, 02:18:33 AM
Funny, I guess, that this one is getting more response from me than a lot of others in this thread.  Here's Bill Simmons' endearing obit.

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January 1980. A Saturday morning. I am watching wrestling only because I can't find anything else. A younger guy with blond hair is battling an older guy with a barrel chest, curly black hair, bushy sideburns and an oversized noggin crammed where his neck should be. Young Guy gets knocked out of the ring accidentally. Older Guy holds the ropes apart, politely invites Young Guy back in … then gets sucker punched by Young Guy. The crowd is appalled. The announcer is appalled. Hell, I am appalled.

Young Guy won't stop punching and kicking Older Guy. He grabs a chair and creams Older Guy with it. Right in the noggin. Older Guy wobbles to his feet and gets clubbed again. The crowd is screaming as though it's watching a baby get dangled out of a window. The fans don't want Older Guy to rise again, but of course, he can't help himself. He staggers to his feet one more time, "bleeding PROFUSELY!" as the announcer says. Young Guy readies the chair. I can't believe what's happening. I am witnessing a murder.

And then … thwack!

Older Guy crumples into a heap, blood pouring from his head. Young Guy disdainfully tosses the chair away, soaks in the jeers for a few seconds, then struts out of the ring wearing an evil smirk. Older Guy doesn't move. He's lying in a puddle of hemoglobin. He's dead. He's definitely dead. They go to commercial. I keep watching. I need to see what happens.

And just like that … they had me. I watched every Saturday after that, quickly realizing many of the stereotypes of an '80s wrestling fan: obsessed with sports, awkward around girls, tons of time on my hands, just smart enough to enjoy the funniest things about wrestling and just dumb enough never to ask questions. This was like joining a little club of sorts. We had our Saturday TV show, our magazines, our live event that passed through town every month or so, our T-shirts, our posters, and that was about it. We kept to ourselves. We didn't bother anyone. We didn't try to convert anyone. Whenever we found other wrestling fans, we bonded with them immediately.

Back then, we played up every "real" moment and brushed over the sketchier stuff. One time in Madison Square Garden, I watched Bob Backlund break out of Big John Studd's dreaded backbreaker by steering him toward the corner, pushing off the turnbuckle, then toppling Studd over and pinning him. A few weeks later, I attended another Studd-Backlund main event in Boston Garden that ended the same way. Hmmmmmm. Had to be a coincidence. Studd was stupid for falling for the same trick twice. I wasn't lying to myself, just believing what I wanted to believe.

That's what every wrestling fan did. We straddled the line between real and fake all the time. Sure, we loved the storylines, gimmicks, feuds, interviews, comedy, unintentional comedy … but at the heart of it, we loved straddling that line, when something intended to be fake ended up feeling real. Piper pounding Snuka with coconuts? Real. Killer Khan breaking Andre's leg? Real. Sgt. Slaughter defending America's honor from the Iron Sheik? Real. It helped that wrestling crowds sounded as good as or better than any other crowd, like the Boot Camp Match in Madison Square Garden when Sarge coldcocked Sheik with the boot, then everyone shrieked the referee's count in unison. Onnnnne! Twwwwwo! Threeeeeee! Hrraaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhh! That wasn't real?

Our big reckoning came in 1984 and 1985, when the sport improbably went mainstream thanks to Mr. T, Cyndi Lauper, MTV, USA's "Tuesday Night Titans," Hulk's Sports Illustrated cover and a closed-circuit, later pay-per-view event called "WrestleMania." Suddenly, wrestling was cool, which made little sense because wrestling fans were fundamentally uncool. We felt vindicated and exposed all at once. As casual fans gravitated toward Hogan in droves, you can guess what happened next: Die-hards started searching for someone new, someone who wasn't so … popular. You know when a musical band hits it big and its original fans resent sharing the band with everyone else? That was Hogan. His new fans didn't care that he had only four moves, that he couldn't carry a bad opponent, that his matches ended the same way every time. He catered to those bandwagon morons. We found ourselves blaming him for it. Just a little. We needed someone who belonged to us.

Almost on cue, Randy Savage arrived in the summer of 1985. Wrestlers usually showed up in the WWF as unfinished products: They would make their mistakes, screw up a gimmick or three, find what worked, and stick with it. Not Savage. From day one, he carried himself like Superstar Graham, worked the crowd like Roddy Piper and used the ring like Ricky Steamboat. He dressed in lavishly ridiculous outfits, custom-made cowboy hats and jackets bathed in pink and lime green.

And his interviews … my God. You needed a translator even if he was speaking in English. Those first few weeks, you watched him and said, "Eventually, I'm going to figure this guy out." Nope. Thanks to YouTube, his finest work endures with titles like "Macho Man on coke" (it just seemed like it) and "Macho Man is insane" (possibly true). He made Johnny Rodz seem predictable.

That should have been enough, but Savage had a trump card: he became the first high-profile WWF wrestler to travel with a female manager, the gorgeous Miss Elizabeth, a godsend for horny wrestling fans who eventually opened the door to Missy Hyatt, Sable, Sunny and every "diva" today. Please understand: Wrestling was like a sausage party from college until Miss Elizabeth showed up. Why didn't anyone say, "Hey, our sport revolves around male wrestlers rolling around in tights in front of a predominantly male audience … maybe we should import a few attractive ladies in here to mix it up"? It's a great question. Better late than never.

Their original storyline apparently was written by Ike Turner: Savage played the jealous, abusive boyfriend who blamed the late Elizabeth for everything, a twisted version of a "damsel in distress" plot. More than once, she would screw up a match and Savage would pull her into the ring by her hair, with fans begging him not to hurt her. Every time, and I mean, every time, we were freaked out that Elizabeth -- more beautiful than just about anyone in 1985 with the possible exception of Kelly Preston, by the way -- might get roughed up by her jealous boyfriend even though it never actually happened. I'm not condoning this angle (and it never would fly in 2011, or even post-OJ, obviously), just noting that Savage had so much talent that even the "mean-spirited, potentially abusive boyfriend" gimmick couldn't hold him down. How many wrestlers could have parlayed that into "good guy" status?

Those Elizabeth blowups and goofy interviews reinforced Savage's defining trait: his unpredictability, always the best thing about his wrestling. If Jimmy Snuka was the Dr. J of jumping off the top rope, then Savage was MJ. Wrestling moved pretty slowly back then: lots of headlocks and clotheslines, lots of rolling around, lots of killed time, lots of fat rolls and labored breathing. Savage murdered that era almost overnight. He dragged 20-minute matches out of Hogan and took 90 percent of the bumps. He climbed to the top rope and delivered flying assaults to opponents outside the ring, which I can't remember having seen before. His devastating finishing move (a flying elbow off the top rope) was so convincing that you always wondered, "Wait, is he actually hurting people when he does that?"

Everything peaked with his Steamboat feud, which started when Savage "crushed" Steamboat's larynx with the timekeeper's bell. (Steamboat "lost" the ability to speak, which led to some of the unintentionally funniest interviews ever done. In general, Ricky Steamboat made Vin Diesel look like Daniel Day-Lewis.) They settled their score in Detroit in front of something like 90,000 people, with their Wrestlemania III battle becoming the first great modern match, the Hagler-Hearns of wrestling moments. In a memorable sports year that included Leonard upsetting Hagler, the Lakers outlasting the Celtics, Indiana shocking Syracuse, Elway unleashing The Drive and Calgary toppling Edmonton, I'd put Steamboat-Savage against any of them. It was that good. The full potential of professional wrestling, realized.

For those first few WWF years, Savage simply couldn't miss. He picked the best possible manager and feuded with the best possible people. His nickname doubled as the single best wrestling nickname of that decade unless you want to argue for "The Million Dollar Man." His entrance music ("Pomp and Circumstance") was obviously a better choice than the Village People's "Macho Man," but kudos to him for making the right call. He wasn't opposed to wrestling with his sunglasses on (a lost art, really), and his crazy beard/thinning hair/bandanna/sunglasses look shouldn't have worked but always did. His interviews were phenomenally bizarre and undeniably entertaining, and, by the way, he might have been the first wrestler to refer to himself almost entirely in the third person. The Macho Man was like the Rickey Henderson of wrestling, right down to the fact that you never knew what the hell he was talking about.

Nobody -- repeat, nobody -- was more fun to imitate. Savage said everything in quick bursts, with his voice dropping low, then turning loud, then low, then loud, and any time he couldn't figure out how to end a point, he just screamed, "Ooooohhhhhhhhh yeah!" He used "ooooohhhh yeah!" as a noun, verb and adjective. It never stopped being funny. I could never decide whether the Macho Man was in on the joke. I'm also not sure it mattered.

By the time Savage won the WWF title, I was heading to college and starting to grow out of the wrestling thing. It happens. As luck would have it, I landed in a room right next to another freshman wrestling fan. We called him the Birdman, and within three weeks, I was knocking on Bird's door, waiting for him to open it, then whipping baby powder in his face like Mr. Fuji's salt and "attacking" him. There was no wrestling joke we couldn't beat into the ground. The Birdman also did a dead-on Savage impersonation, even better than mine, so we wasted countless hours talking like Savage, doing fake Savage interviews and greeting each other with exaggerated Savage-like handshakes. We made multiple field trips to a local mall that had the WWF's then-superb arcade game, usually arguing over who got to be Savage. Did either of us have a girlfriend? What do you think?

In February 1989, our college staged its annual Blind Date Ball -- a little like a prom, only your roommate set you up with your date. As luck would have it, the most famous Friday Night Main Event match ever was scheduled that same night. Now considered a "good guy," Savage had been tag-teaming with Hogan as the Mega Powers … only Hogan's budding friendship with Miss Elizabeth was making Savage jealous. Any true wrestling fan knew where this was headed. They were setting us up for a double-cross in that night's tag-team match against Akeem and the Big Bossman. Bird and I kept joking about ditching our dates to catch it, one of those situations in which you're pretending to be kidding but, deep down, you're waiting for the other person to say, "You know what? We SHOULD do that!"

Finally, I broke the ice: "Let's go into my room and just check for a second."

Bird agreed. We snuck away, went upstairs and turned the television on. Hadn't started yet. We rejoined the party. A few minutes later, we snuck away again in time to see Miss Elizabeth get knocked out cold, with a crying Hogan carrying her backstage for medical attention and Savage eventually ditching the match. After Hogan finished off the Twin Towers by himself, he confronted Savage backstage, with the Macho Man snapping and unleashing his most inspired monologue ever.

Lemme tell you why you're out of line, man. You got JEALOUS eyes!

We knew what was coming and loved it anyway: Savage sucker punched Hogan and beat him senseless, just a virtuoso performance, one of the defining buddy-turning-on-buddy events of the past 30 years. I'd put it up there with Biggie turning on Tupac, Crockett shooting Tubbs, Brandon going after Dylan's girlfriend, T.O. backstabbing McNabb, Westbrook punching Durant (fine, it hasn't happened yet -- I'm projecting) and everything else. And Bird and I were in my room going crazy watching it … at least until my door opened and Bird's date was standing there. Uh-oh.

Did either of us get lucky that night? Of course not. Although we did get to re-enact the entire "You got jealous eyes!" scene at 3 a.m. for our floormates, after about 45 beers apiece, with our pal Nick Aieta playing Miss Elizabeth. (Fortunately, no videotape exists. Or maybe unfortunately.) It's one of my favorite dumb memories from college, and, to be honest, it was probably the last night I ever truly loved wrestling. It pulls me back every so often, but not like that. Not even close.

Of course, you never stop liking wrestling. When word broke last week that a car accident had claimed Savage, I couldn't believe how many people emailed me about it. He lasted 58 years, forever by wrestling standards, but it still felt too soon. I liked knowing Savage was out there, giving insane interviews and leaving people generally perplexed. The scope of his career can't compare to those of Shawn Michaels or Ric Flair, but you won't find a more meaningful apex: He peaked right as wrestling peaked, ushered in a more athletic era and introduced eye candy (Elizabeth) to a fan base that desperately needed it. We look back at the '80s ironically now -- everything is much funnier now than it was then, whether it's outfits, haircuts, movie plots, political incorrectness or even a sweeping lack of self-awareness. Savage tapped into those faults better than anyone. He was the '80s, for better and worse.

And then there's this: I became a wrestling fan thanks to a moment that I never expected, but, gradually, you learn what to expect. You see the angles before they happen, the twists before they twist, the double crosses before they're crossed. Only Savage kept me guessing. The man captured all the reasons I loved wrestling better than anyone, and, for that, Randy Savage will always be my favorite. Oooooohhhhhhh yeah. And then some.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 07, 2011, 12:48:36 PM
It's been a week of deaths and you all haven't kept this thread up!

Today's is Lilian Jackson Braun, who made an obscene fortune off of her never-ending "The Cat Who..." mystery series. The Cat Who Cashed Large Royalty Checks!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 20, 2011, 05:20:17 PM
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Daredevil Jackass star Ryan Dunn — perhaps best known for his "toy car" stunt from Jackass: The Movie — was killed early this morning in a Pennsylvania car crash. The 34-year-old was driving with one passenger when their 2007 Porsche 911 GT3 hit a tree and burst into flames; the passenger also died. "We are devastated by the tragic loss of Ryan Dunn — a beloved member of the MTV family for more than a decade," said MTV head Van Toffler in a statement
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 24, 2011, 04:30:31 PM
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Peter Falk, TV's rumpled Columbo, has died

Falk died Thursday at age 83 in his Beverly Hills, Calif., home, according to a statement released Friday by family friend Larry Larson. In a court document filed in December 2008, Falk's daughter Catherine Falk said her father was suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 24, 2011, 04:34:34 PM
Yet another file under "thought they had died."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Cassander on June 29, 2011, 10:29:18 PM
Chef Leeming, whom know one knows outside of NOLA, died this past week.  My first "personally hit me and got me choked up as soon as I heard it" death in a looooong time.  Only Nacho knows these places, but Chef Leeming worked at Dick and Jenny's, which is was the first "expensive" restaurant we started to frequent where the food was always inspirational and soul-fueling.  He had it out with the owner then left to open up Coulis, a breakfast/lunch diner in a spot that had formerly died (the Bluebird Cafe)...also did this so he could spend afternoons with his young son who was a friend of our neighbor's boy.  I didn't know him very well personally, but I've known dozens of people who worked under him and his legacy in New orleans is pretty substantial.  We're going to miss him.  What is really impressive is that he grew up in Nicaragua in the 70s and 80s and worked his way up from food runner to head chef.  A real great, quiet man who should've accomplished more.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 30, 2011, 08:14:29 AM
God. I hit Coulis on the way out last time.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 23, 2011, 02:44:51 PM
Amy Winehouse, dead at 27.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 23, 2011, 02:49:53 PM
Amy Winehouse, dead at 27.

Came here to post that! Thought we had a deathwatch thread for her too?

But wow...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 23, 2011, 02:56:09 PM
Same age as Jimi, Janis, Jim Morrison, Cobain, and Brian Jones.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 23, 2011, 03:07:10 PM
Conspiracy!

Okay, I have to go back to the beach.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 04, 2011, 07:34:01 AM
Oh, man...this is sad. Along with John Belliars, he was one of the main children's book writers I read as a kid. And probably an important step to get me on my sci-fi addict path... House of Stairs still holds up.


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Author William Sleator passed away this week. Sleator is perhaps best known for his young adult science fiction and horror books including Interstellar Pig and House of Stairs.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Sirharles on August 04, 2011, 09:36:20 AM
Nacho shame on you!  No mention of Bubba Smith?

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LOS ANGELES -- Former NFL star Bubba Smith, who went from feared defensive end on the field to endearing giant in his successful second career as an actor, died Wednesday. He was 66.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 04, 2011, 10:24:59 AM
I read your post out loud and all my co-workers started shouting in surprise and sadness.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 05, 2011, 10:13:32 AM
Quote
The use of “Mondo Cane” and more specifically “Mondo” and “Mundo” to denote a collection of weird stories is behind the origins of the naming of Cryptomundo.

Now word has reached us that the director of that first significant movie in that genre has died.

http://www.cryptomundo.com/cryptozoo-news/jacopetti-obit/
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 12, 2011, 07:23:32 AM
After I forced my way through the pilot, I really got into Spartacus. It was like Rome lite, and actually ended up pretty awesome.

Then Whitfield got cancer. Season two was an equally awesome "life flashing before your eyes" prequel from John Hannah's viewpoint...

Whitfield's died...


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-14878973

Also, Cliff Robertson died.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-14869693
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 05, 2011, 11:25:04 AM
Andy Rooney signs off at 92.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 05, 2011, 12:29:49 PM
Wow. End of an era. Though talk about having a good run...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 08, 2011, 06:32:30 PM
Heavy D!

Edit: http://www.tmz.com/2011/11/08/heavy-d-dead/
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 09, 2011, 09:13:43 AM
Man... That's REALLY depressing.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 09, 2011, 10:39:08 PM
Bill Keane. Maybe that'll put an end to Family Circus.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on November 09, 2011, 11:32:40 PM
Doesn't Billy draw it now?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 10, 2011, 07:22:19 AM
It'll never die.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 10, 2011, 10:06:59 AM
And there's our triumvirate.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 10, 2011, 02:19:50 PM
The Western Black Rhino!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-15663982

Apparently unable to handle the news that Family Circus will still be syndicated.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on November 10, 2011, 09:17:10 PM
Joe Frasier died also.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 28, 2011, 11:36:25 AM
Director Ken Russell has taken the final trip.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 28, 2011, 11:47:57 AM
I'm surprised he lasted this long!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 29, 2011, 01:18:50 PM
Stalin's daughter:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-15936172
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 07, 2011, 03:34:00 PM
Colonel Potter!

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/08/arts/television/harry-morgan-mash-and-dragnet-actor-dies-at-96.html?_r=1&src=tp&smid=fb-share


Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 13, 2011, 11:33:41 AM
Missed this... Jerry Robinson died.

Quote
While Bob Kane is justly celebrated as Batman's creator, his one-time inker and frequent collaborator Jerry Robinson was the man behind the Joker, comics' most enduring villain. He then went on to live a rich life, championing creators' rights and comics scholarship.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 19, 2011, 09:03:01 AM
I just woke up, but this is pretty huge...

Quote
North Korean leader Kim Jong Il dies
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 19, 2011, 09:33:29 AM
Long overdue.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 19, 2011, 12:11:15 PM
I love reading about his successor. "A shy but determined boy obsessed with basketball and expensive shoes."

Vanished completely in 2000, reappears as heir apparent in 2008. No comment on why or where he'd been.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 19, 2011, 03:07:59 PM
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 01, 2012, 11:33:28 AM
Wow... you just never know do you?

Quote
Don Cornelius, the man who created Soul Train, was reportedly found dead Wednesday morning at his Los Angeles home.  Police sources tell TMZ.com that Cornelius appears to have taken his own life; sources say he died from what appears to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound.  He was 75.

Cornelius created "Soul Train" and hosted the show in national syndication from 1971 to 1993.  It was the first real venue on American TV for soul music, and as the show's writer and producer, as well as host, Cornelius played a vital role in bringing stars like James Brown, Aretha Franklin and Michael Jackson to a wider audience.  Some have described the show as "a black American Bandstand," though Cornelius was not a fan of that comparison.  As the host, he was known for the catchphrase with which he closed each episode: "I'm Don Cornelius, and as always in parting, we wish you love, peace and soul!"

"Soul Train," which ceased airing in 2006, also spun off the Soul Train Music Awards and the Soul Train Lady of Soul Awards.   Its most famous theme song, "TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia)," by MFSB became a massive pop hit in 1974.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 01, 2012, 11:42:15 AM
So...I used to watch Soul Train all the fucking time, man.




And that insane 70's opener:

http://www.retrojunk.com/tv/videos/1115-soul-train/1144/#intro
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 06, 2012, 02:54:53 PM
Quote
Bill Hinzman, the first zombie to lumber across the screen in George A. Romero's Night Of The Living Dead, has sadly passed away. Details are slim right now, but it's reported that he succumbed to cancer. Check back here for any updates. I never get really sentimental when people in the film world leave us, but I've met Bill numerous times over the last decade. He was a regular at the Spooky Empire horror convention in Orlando, FL and kicked off the annual zombie walk almost every year that I went. He was always a cool guy, hanging out at the pool with everyone as the festival started winding down for the evening, and I never saw him turn down a fan for a quick photo in the hallway, an autograph, or even an interview. He was in several early Romero films - he even DPed The Crazies - but his first scene in Night would set the precedent for the undead in one of the most well-known and highly regarded trilogies in horror history (I count Land as the start of a new one). RIP Bill Hinzman, THE FIRST ROMERO ZOMBIE.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 06, 2012, 03:10:26 PM
I met Hinzman at one of the cons, and not just in a fan kind of way. (Well, it was a fan kind of way I guess.) Judith O'Dea introduced us. Nice guy. Really wore his "first zombie" stats as a badge of honor.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 06, 2012, 04:12:51 PM
Quote
Writer and director Zalman King died February 3, aged 69, following a lengthy battle with cancer. Although he used his script credit on 9 1/2 Weeks to launch a successful career in movies and cable tv, King began as an actor, his genre appearances including Blue Sunshine (1978), Galaxy of Terror (1981), and TV shows such as The Munsters and The Man From U.N.C.L.E. He also appeared in the Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode “Memo From Purgatory,” written by Harlan Ellison and co-starring James Caan and Star Trek’s Walter Koenig. And Ellison later praised King’s performance in The Young Lawyers (1969-71) in his tv column The Glass Teat.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 09, 2012, 12:49:10 PM
A near-miss for Clive Barker. Seven days in a coma.


Quote
"My friends, Clive here. I'm at home now after a while in hospital, thanks to a nearly fatal case of Toxic Shock brought on by a visit to my dentist. Apparently this is not uncommon. In my case the dental work unloaded such a spillage of poisonous bacteria into my blood that my whole system crashed, putting me into a coma.I spent several days in Intensive Care, with a machine breathing for me. Later, my Doctors said that they had not anticipated a happy ending until I started to fight, repeatedly pulling out the tubes that I was constantly gagging on. After a few days of nightmarish delusions I woke up to my life again, tired, twenty pounds lighter, but happy to be back from a very dark place. And here in the world I intend to stay. I've books to write ,films to make and paintings to paint. I seem to have come home with my sight clearer somehow, and my sense of purpose intensified.Thank you all for your messages your prayers and love. What better reason to wake to life than knowing I have such friends? Again,thank you. My love to you always. Clive."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 09, 2012, 12:51:00 PM
I saw him two years ago at a con and he looked dreadful. I'm surprised he's lasted this long. There's been longtime AIDS rumors.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 11, 2012, 10:45:48 PM
Exeunt Whitney Houston.

http://gma.yahoo.com/whitney-houston-iconic-pop-star-dies-48-014318782--abc-news.html
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 12, 2012, 05:37:14 PM
Wow...shit. I haven't been following her story at all. My last image of her is from the 80's... This blows me away.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 12, 2012, 05:54:28 PM
While I certainly had a "Who didn't see that coming" moment when I read the news, it was still pretty shocking nonetheless.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 18, 2012, 04:44:38 PM
Dick Clark signs off...

http://www.tmz.com/2012/04/18/dick-clark-dead-heart-attack/ (http://www.tmz.com/2012/04/18/dick-clark-dead-heart-attack/)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 18, 2012, 05:17:54 PM
Beat me to it!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 19, 2012, 03:49:08 PM
From AICN...

Quote
Jonathan Frid, Barnabas Collins, is at rest...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 19, 2012, 04:45:24 PM
From AICN...

Quote
Jonathan Frid, Barnabas Collins, is at rest...

Yeah, sure! That's what we all thought in 1967, but then Willie Loomis broke the chains on the coffin...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 19, 2012, 05:53:18 PM
Number three!

Levon Helm.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 20, 2012, 08:53:40 AM
And there's the trifecta...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 21, 2012, 10:52:42 PM
And there's the trifecta...

Superfecta.

Chuck Colson. Nixon's hatchet man.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on May 05, 2012, 08:01:59 AM
MCA from the Beasties a goner. I wonder if Nach remembers how big they were back in the day (mid and late 1980s) among Montgomery County youth and adolescents...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 05, 2012, 08:15:52 AM
MCA from the Beasties a goner. I wonder if Nach remembers how big they were back in the day (mid and late 1980s) among Montgomery County youth and adolescents...

Um...and...the rest of America.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on May 06, 2012, 10:30:52 PM
No, I'm pretty sure it was just MoCo.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 07, 2012, 07:18:23 AM
And just Bethesda, at that.

Ah, yes...there we were. 1990. Local Bethesda, MD band, the Beastie Boys, will be playing at the Yacht Club Sunday at 11am for brunch!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 07, 2012, 02:05:25 PM
The guy who played Goober Pyle!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 07, 2012, 03:17:36 PM
Quote
R.I.P. Jason X director James Isaac (1960 – 2012)

Sad day. I regret to inform you that the director behind Jason X, James Isaac, has passed away. Several sources are confirming that his cause of death was due to a rare type of blood cancer. This is a loss to the horror community, whether you recognize the name or not. Here’s a brief bio of the late director.

Mr. Isaac directed three real noteworthy films. Jason X is the 10th installment in the Friday the 13th, which was released in 2001 and was a minor box office success. Skinwalkers, a werewolf action film, was released in 2006 mostly straight-to-DVD, but has become one of the most popular movies on the SyFy Channel. Lastly, the creature feature Pig Hunt was released in 2008 and won several awards at various film festivals.

James also has miscellaneous credits on films including The Horror Show, The Fly, Gremlins, Virtuosity, House II, and Children of The Corn: Fields of Terror.

Thank you for all your contributions to horror, James, and may you rest in peace.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 07, 2012, 05:03:55 PM
Man got to see Lexi Doig naked. So that's a complete and happy life in my book.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 08, 2012, 10:18:58 AM
The next triumvirate? Goober Pyle, the Jason X director, and:

Quote
Maurice Sendak, the US author of the best-selling children's book Where the Wild Things Are, dies aged 83.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 08, 2012, 01:17:17 PM
Quote
Rest In Peace: We've just learned that character actor George Murdock passed away on April 30th at age 81. He appeared in dozens of television shows including the original Battlestar Galactica (Dr. Salik), Barney Miller (Lt. Ben Scanlon), Star Trek: The Next Generation (Admiral Hansan; he was also "God" in Star Trek V: The Final Frontier), The X-Files (Elder #2), ER, Night Court, the original The Twilight Zone, the original The Untouchables, No Time For Sergeants, Tarzan, The Bold Ones: The Lawyers, It Takes a Thief, Bonanza, The Name of the Game, Hawaii Five-O, Adam-12, S.W.A.T., The F.B.I., The Six Million Dollar Man, Banacek, Ironside, Gunsmoke, McCloud, The Invisible Man ('75), Search, Police Woman, Switch, Little House on the Prairie, The Streets of San Francisco, Lou Grant, The Rockford Files, The Dukes of Hazzard, Bosom Buddies, Hill Street Blues, Benson, Winds of War, Fame, Small Wonder, What A Country, Dynasty, L.A. Law, Equal Justice, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, Chicago Hope, Seinfeld, Just Shoot Me, Law & Order, C.S.I. and he most recently had a role in the third episode of Torchwood: Miracle Day.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on May 09, 2012, 05:06:46 PM
Wow.... Lexa Doig.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 09, 2012, 08:21:23 PM
Wow.... Lexa Doig.

Did you just discover her? Because, yes. I spent lots of time thinking about her. Get some episodes of Andromeda under your belt. Cute, naive ship's avatar in tight leather!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 16, 2012, 11:32:01 PM
At a ball game, but just got wind that Chuck Brown died. If I have to explain who he was, then you probably weren't a resident of the DMV environs or much of a hip-hop fan. But in DC and it's surrounding area, he was nothing less than an icon. I've written before about the artistic culture specific to DC, and a huge part of it is gone.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on May 17, 2012, 01:02:11 AM
Soul Searchers one of the true gems of 1970s music, in my humble opinion at least.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 17, 2012, 08:49:53 AM
Chuck Brown's obit in the Post:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/chuck-brown-dies-the-godfather-of-go-go-was-75/2012/05/16/gIQAJAfPUU_story.html (http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/chuck-brown-dies-the-godfather-of-go-go-was-75/2012/05/16/gIQAJAfPUU_story.html)

Quote
Chuck Brown dies: The ‘Godfather of Go-Go’ was 75

Chuck Brown, the gravelly voiced bandleader who capitalized on funk’s percussive pulse to create go-go, the genre of music that has soundtracked life in black Washington for more than three decades, died May 16 at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He was 75.

The death, from complications from sepsis, was confirmed by his manager, Tom Goldfogle. Mr. Brown had been hospitalized for pneumonia.

Known as the “Godfather of Go-Go,” the performer, singer, guitarist and songwriter developed his commanding brand of funk in the mid-1970s to compete with the dominance of disco.

Like a DJ blending records, Mr. Brown used nonstop percussion to stitch songs together and keep the crowd on the dance floor, resulting in marathon performances that went deep into the night. Mr. Brown said the style got its name because “the music just goes and goes.”

In addition to being go-go’s principal architect, Mr. Brown remained the genre’s most charismatic figure. On stage, his spirited call-and-response routines became a hallmark of the music, reinforcing a sense of community that allowed the scene to thrive. As go-go became a point of pride for black Washingtonians, Mr. Brown became one of the city’s most recognizable figures.

“No single type of music has been more identified with Washington than go-go, and no one has loomed so large within it as Chuck Brown,” former Washington Post pop music critic Richard Harrington wrote in 2001.

Mr. Brown’s creation, however, failed to have the same impact outside of the Beltway. The birth of go-go doubled as the high-water mark of Mr. Brown’s national career. With his group the Soul Searchers, his signature hit “Bustin’ Loose” not only minted the go-go sound, it spent four weeks atop the R&B singles chart in 1978.

“Bustin’ Loose” was “the one record I had so much confidence in,” Mr. Brown told The Post in 2001. “I messed with it for two years, wrote a hundred lines of lyrics and only ended up using two lines. . . . It was the only time in my career that I felt like it’s going to be a hit.”

It was Mr. Brown’s biggest single, but throughout the 1980s “We Need Some Money,” “Go-Go Swing” and “Run Joe” became local anthems, reinforced by radio support and the grueling performance schedule that put Mr. Brown on area stages six nights a week.

While rap music exploded across the country, go-go dominated young black Washington, with groups including Trouble Funk, Rare Essence and Experience Unlimited (also known as E.U.) following in Mr. Brown’s footsteps.

Mr. Brown performed less frequently in his final years but still took the stage regularly. He would often comment on his golden years in rhyme.

“I’m not retired because I’m not tired. I’m still getting hired, and I’m still inspired,” he said in 2006. “As long as I can walk up on that stage, I want to make people happy. I want to make people dance.”

Charles Louis Brown was born in Gaston, N.C., on Aug. 22, 1936. He never knew his father, Albert Louis Moody, a Marine. He took the surname of his mother, Lyla Louise Brown, a housekeeper who raised her several children in poverty.

“We’d go to somebody’s house and [my mother] would say, ‘Please feed my child. Don’t worry about me. Just feed my child,’ ” Mr. Brown recalled tearfully in a Post interview in 2011.

Mr. Brown was 8 when his family relocated to Washington, where he abandoned his schooling for a childhood filled with odd jobs. He sold newspapers at the bus station and shined shoes at the Navy Yard, where he recalled being tipped kindly by entertainers including Hank Williams and Les Paul.

As a teenager, Mr. Brown began to flirt with petty crime and stumbled into a disastrous situation in the mid-1950s when he shot a man in what he said was self-defense.

A Virginia jury convicted Mr. Brown of aggravated assault, which was bumped up to murder when the victim died in the hospital six months later. Mr. Brown served eight years at the Lorton Correctional Complex. There, he swapped five cartons of cigarettes for another inmate’s guitar.

Upon his release, Mr. Brown returned to Washington, where he worked as a truck driver, a bricklayer and a sparring partner at local boxing gyms. He also began to play guitar and sing at backyard barbecues across the area. His parole officer wouldn’t let him sing in nightclubs that served liquor.

In 1964, he joined Jerry Butler and the Earls of Rhythm and, in 1965, a group called Los Latinos. Both local acts played top-40 hits at area nightclubs; in 1966, Mr. Brown formed his own group, the Soul Searchers. He originally considered taking the stage name “Chuck Brown, the Soul Searcher.”

With the Soul Searchers, Mr. Brown scored minor hits in the early ’70s — “We the People” and “Blow Your Whistle” — but eventually decided to emulate James Brown by trying to create his own sound. Inspired by the percussive feel of Grover Washington Jr.’s “Mister Magic” and rhythms that Mr. Brown internalized as a child in church, he settled on go-go’s loping, popping cadence.

Mr. Brown sang gospel in childhood and was a guitarist fluent in jazz and blues who could toggle between gritty riffs and fluid solos. But he truly excelled behind the microphone, bringing a warm voice that he could punch up into a hot shout or tamp down into a sandpapery purr or a gentle croon as the drummer’s conga popped and rumbled along.

The influence of jazz and pop standards could be heard in much of Brown’s go-go material. Motifs from jazz staples “Moody’s Mood for Love” and “Harlem Nocturne” became a part of his “Go-Go Swing,” and Brown reshaped Louis Jordan’s calypso “Run Joe” into a go-go classic.

In turn, go-go would have its influence on jazz when trumpeter Miles Davis plucked longtime Soul Searchers drummer Ricky Wellman for one of his last touring bands. Many spotted go-go rhythms on Davis’s 1989 album “Amandla.”

And while hip-hop raced past go-go in the ’80s, Mr. Brown eventually influenced that genre as well. He was sampled by various hip-hop artists, most notably in Nelly’s 2002 hit “Hot in Herre.”   

But his impact was felt most acutely in the Washington area, where his sound spawned a generation of bands who would pull go-go into focus in the ’80s. Mr. Brown was always the genre’s champion, but he was quick to acknowledge the importance of other band leaders, Andre “Whiteboy” Johnson of Rare Essence, “Big Tony” Fisher of Trouble Funk and the late Anthony “Lil Benny” Harley, among them.

“These guys were the pioneers of go-go, and they each have their own distinct sound and identity,” Mr. Brown told The Post in 2001. “Everybody has something to offer.”

In 1992, Mr. Brown helped launch the career of the late singer Eva Cassidy, recording and releasing an album of duets, titled “The Other Side,” that confirmed his talent as an interpreter of standards.

Formal recognition came late in Mr. Brown’s life. He was nominated for his first Grammy Award in 2011, when he was 74, for best rhythm-and-blues performance by a duo or group with vocals for “Love,” a collaboration with singer Jill Scott and bassist Marcus Miller.

In 2005, the National Endowment for the Arts presented Mr. Brown with a Lifetime Heritage Fellowship Award. And in 2009, the District named a segment of Seventh Street NW “Chuck Brown Way”; it was a strip near the Howard Theatre where he used to shine shoes as a child.

He appeared in advertisements for the D.C. Lottery and The Post and became the city’s unofficial mascot, known for his extroverted warmth and willingness to flash his gold-toothed smile for any fan hoping to join him for a snapshot. An appearance on U Street NW outside Ben’s Chili Bowl could stop traffic.

“I really appreciate that I can’t go nowhere without people hollering at me,” Mr. Brown said in 2010. “I love being close to people.”

Mr. Brown also leaves behind a still-standing genre that, as he once told MTV, embodied the highest of human emotions.

“It’s about love, the communication between performer and audience,” Mr. Brown said of go-go. “When you’re on stage, the people put that love to you and you give it back. There’s no other music like it.”
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 17, 2012, 02:00:14 PM
Quote
Disco Queen Donna Summer has had her last dance: she passed away this morning of cancer at age 63.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 17, 2012, 02:11:47 PM
Adam Yauch, Chuck Brown, Donna Summer... Hip-Hop trifecta...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on May 17, 2012, 06:13:37 PM
Loved Chuck Brown's half time performance at the Skins' game last year (or was it the year prior).
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 06, 2012, 12:10:50 PM
Quote
Author Ray Bradbury dies at 91
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 06, 2012, 01:12:20 PM
Quote
Author Ray Bradbury dies at 91

I immediately went to Rachel Bloom's FB page! She's on it...and has a sweet picture of the two of them in her profile.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 18, 2012, 07:58:15 AM
Rodney king:

 http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/17/us/obit-rodney-king/index.html?c=us
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 18, 2012, 12:46:31 PM
Spooky...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 26, 2012, 10:04:09 PM
Nora Ephron...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 28, 2012, 04:19:44 PM
Quote
LOS ANGELES (TheWrap.com) - Don Grady, who played Robbie Douglas on the TV show "My Three Sons" and was one of the Mickey Mouse Club's original Mouseketeers, died Wednesday.

He was 68.

"My dear friend and TV brother Don Grady passed away today," posted his "My Three Sons" co-star Barry Livingston. "He was an inspiration to me in so many ways." Livingston played Ernie on the show.

Born Don Louis Agrati in 1944, Grady was best known for his role as one of the sons on the long-running series, which co-starred Fred MacMurray and William Demarest. Grady wrote some of the episodes and performed some of his own songs.

He appeared in a number of TV series, including "The Ann Southern Show," "Zane Grey Theater," "The Rifleman," "The Lucy Show" and "Simon and Simon."

Grady, who was signed to a composing, writing and singing contract by Capitol Records when he was 19, went on to a career as a composer following his TV career. He did the music for the Blake Edwards comedy "Switch," the theme song for "The Phil Donahue Show" and music for the Las Vegas stage show "EFX."

He released two albums, "Boomer: JazRokPop" in 2008 and "Homegrown," via Elektra Records in 1973.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 03, 2012, 11:32:18 AM
Andy Griffith.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 03, 2012, 12:12:56 PM
Andy Griffith.

Ah, my... Sad.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 08, 2012, 07:36:45 PM
Quote
Oscar-winning film star Ernest Borgnine dies in LA at age 95
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 09, 2012, 11:08:30 AM
Man. Could have sworn he was already gone!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 16, 2012, 04:23:20 PM
Quote
'Encyclopedia Brown' Author Donald Sobol Dies At 87
by THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

text size A A A July 16, 2012
Donald J. Sobol, the author who dreamed up the kid sleuth Encyclopedia Brown in dozens of books that sold millions of copies, has died at age 87.

Sobol died of natural causes in Miami on July 11, his son John told the Associated Press on Monday.

His series featured amateur investigator Leroy "Encyclopedia" Brown, who would unravel local mysteries with the help of his encyclopedic knowledge of facts great and small. The books, first published in the early 1960s, became staples in classrooms and libraries nationwide. They were translated into 12 languages and sold millions of copies worldwide.

"Thanks to Donald, generations of children have learned to read and solve mysteries alongside Encyclopedia Brown, one of the most iconic characters in children's literature," said Don Weisberg, president of Penguin Young Readers Group, which publishes Sobol's books.

The Encyclopedia Brown books also featured Brown's friend and detective partner, the tough and athletic Sally Kimball. John Sobol said his dad was ahead of his times in creating a strong female character.

"That was groundbreaking back in 1963, when the series was first published," the son said.

Next year marks the 50th anniversary of the Encyclopedia Brown series. Donald Sobol's latest adventure, Encyclopedia Brown and the Case of the Soccer Scheme, will be published in October, according to a release from Penguin.

Born in New York City, Sobol served in the Army Corps of Engineers during World War II and graduated from Oberlin College. He later worked as a copywriter at the New York Sun, where he eventually became a reporter. His first book was rejected two dozen times before it was published, his son said.

In 1958, Sobol became a successful syndicated columnist with his "Two Minute Mystery" series before publishing Encyclopedia Brown Boy Detective five years later to launch the most popular series of his career.

The Encyclopedia Brown concept, in which the solutions to the mysteries are shown after the story, came to Sobol while he was researching an article at the New York Public Library. A clerk mistakenly handed him a game book, with puzzles on one side and the solutions on the other.

Sobol decided to write a mystery series with the same premise. He earned an Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America award for the series.

John Sobol said his father would frequently test out story ideas on his four children. "We would talk about it sitting around dinner," he said, adding, "My mom also helped inject humor into the stories."

The series inevitably attracted Hollywood, which tried for decades to adapt the books for the big screen, with Anthony Hopkins, Chevy Chase and Goldie Hawn among those interested in the project. But legal disputes over who controls film rights have prevented any feature film from being made.

Sobol's work never brought him the financial success of blockbusters like the Harry Potter series, his son said, but his father loved hearing from countless librarians and parents about children who hated to read until they picked up an Encyclopedia Brown book.

Sobol wrote more than 80 books, working daily until the very end.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 17, 2012, 08:05:47 AM
Quote
The rock world has been paying tribute to Jon Lord, the organist and pianist best known for playing with Deep Purple and Whitesnake, who died yesterday. He’d been fighting off pancreatic cancer.

This excellent obit is also a Youtube hole:

http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2012/07/rip-jon-lord-deep-purples-organ-grinder/
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 23, 2012, 06:52:01 PM
Quote
Sally Ride, the first US woman to fly in space, died on Monday after a 17-month battle with pancreatic cancer, her foundation announced. She was 61.

Ride first launched into space in 1983, on the seventh US space shuttle mission.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 24, 2012, 08:04:06 AM
Whew...that's a big one.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 25, 2012, 10:05:57 AM
Quote
Sherman Hemsley Dead: 'The Jeffersons' Actor Dies At 74
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 25, 2012, 12:24:03 PM
File Under WTF.

Quote
Sherman Hemsley Had An LSD Lab In His Basement

http://badassdigest.com/2012/07/24/sherman-hemsley-had-an-lsd-lab-in-his-basement/ (http://badassdigest.com/2012/07/24/sherman-hemsley-had-an-lsd-lab-in-his-basement/)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 25, 2012, 12:27:33 PM
File Under WTF.

Quote
Sherman Hemsley Had An LSD Lab In His Basement

http://badassdigest.com/2012/07/24/sherman-hemsley-had-an-lsd-lab-in-his-basement/ (http://badassdigest.com/2012/07/24/sherman-hemsley-had-an-lsd-lab-in-his-basement/)

Awesome!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 26, 2012, 08:54:09 AM
Jesus...the first Romana died. Young, too.

Quote
Mary Tamm

The actress who first played the fourth Doctor's Time Lady companion, Romana, has passed away at the age of 62

It’s never the kind of news anybody wants to pass on, and we do so with regret: Mary Tamm, best known to Doctor Who fans as the first incarnation of companion Romana, passed away in hospital this morning following a long battle with cancer.

Yorkshire-born Tamm played the Gallifreyan companion to the fourth Doctor, Tom Baker, between 1978 and 1979 in The Key to Time season arc. Before appearing on Doctor Who, Tamm had featured in a number of films including The Odessa File and The Likely Lads, and appeared on a number of television dramas and soaps since her departure from the sci-fi series.

The sad news of Tamm’s death comes just a month after that of fellow companion actress Caroline John, who played Dr Liz Shaw opposite Jon Pertwee. Our thoughts and best wishes go to both families.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 01, 2012, 07:56:02 AM
Gore Vidal

http://www.denofgeek.com/movies/22197/gore-vidal-1925-%E2%80%93-2012

Quote
Once described as “the 20th century’s finest essayist”, writer Gore Vidal’s career was an extraordinary one, covering novels, essays, stage plays and movies. He began writing at the age of 19, and remained prolific until his final years, by which time he’d written no fewer than 25 novels, several of them best sellers – Burr and Myra Breckenridge were among his most popular.

His movie career included a rewrite of 1959’s classic Ben-Hur and the infamous Caligula (1979), and he regularly wrote for television through the 50s and 60s on shows including Suspense and Armchair Theatre. Vidal also made occasional film appearances, including a role in 1997’s Gattaca and an uncredited cameo in 2002’s Igby Goes Down, and was a regular and lively fixture on television talk shows.

Sharp, opinionated and often extremely funny, Gore Vidal was among the most respected writers of his generation. He sadly passed away at his Los Angeles home yesterday, leaving behind a remarkable body of work.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 01, 2012, 10:31:43 AM
Icon.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 01, 2012, 06:16:24 PM
Jesus...the first Romana died. Young, too.

Quote
Mary Tamm

The actress who first played the fourth Doctor's Time Lady companion, Romana, has passed away at the age of 62

It’s never the kind of news anybody wants to pass on, and we do so with regret: Mary Tamm, best known to Doctor Who fans as the first incarnation of companion Romana, passed away in hospital this morning following a long battle with cancer.

Yorkshire-born Tamm played the Gallifreyan companion to the fourth Doctor, Tom Baker, between 1978 and 1979 in The Key to Time season arc. Before appearing on Doctor Who, Tamm had featured in a number of films including The Odessa File and The Likely Lads, and appeared on a number of television dramas and soaps since her departure from the sci-fi series.

The sad news of Tamm’s death comes just a month after that of fellow companion actress Caroline John, who played Dr Liz Shaw opposite Jon Pertwee. Our thoughts and best wishes go to both families.

I'll try not to take over this thread with too much Doctor Who stuff...but this was nice:




Quote
In the wake of Doctor Who actress Mary Tamm's recent passing, the man who played the Doctor to her Romana, Tom Baker, has decided to pay a heartfelt tribute to the late actress.

For two years (between 1978 and 1979), Mary Tamm shared in the wonderful adventures of Baker's Fourth Doctor as the first Romana—the very first Doctor Who companion who had the particularity of being a Time Lady.

Mary Tamm passed away at the too-early age of 62 after an 18-month long battle with cancer.

This is what Tom Baker wrote on his official website:

The dreadful news of Mary Tamm's death amazed me. I had no idea she was ill. We got on terribly well and I admired her wit and style and warmth. We used to meet at different Who conventions and sometimes had time for a little chat. I remember meeting her at Heathrow in the 1st class section: her section, of course. She was flicking through a magazine and sipping a beer: the epitome of cool style.
When we first worked together her tales of her background (she's from Estonia) kept me very amused. I think they spoke Estonian at home. She used to do an impression of her aunt, I think, who had been an opera singer. She had a marvellous trick of rapid asides which often had nothing to do with the main story but which convulsed us. I tried to copy this trick behind her back but it eluded me as most tricks have eluded me all my life. And that she is dead seems incredible.

Fate is capricious and quite indifferent to our fears. Lovely girls: Elisabeth Sladen, Caroline John and now Mary Tamm: all dead. And here am I closing in on eighty and all I've had was whooping cough! It's not fair, is it? Actually, I also have a creaky knee. And probably a creaky brain.

I never met Mary's daughter and hardly ever met Marcus, her husband. But I send them from the bottom of my old heart sincere condolences. To have known her consoles me a little: poor darling Mary, poor us.

Fate is indeed capricious and indifferent, and we, too, are deeply saddened by Mary Tamm's passing. But maybe we can take some comfort in thinking that she's now probably looking over us all in her own Big Blue Police Box in the sky.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 14, 2012, 10:46:09 PM
Quote
Ron Palillo, the class clown from "Welcome Back, Kotter," has died. The actor best known as Arnold Horshack from the 1970s sitcom was 63. TMZ reports the cause of death was a heart attack.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 14, 2012, 11:53:13 PM
Last sighted at Denny's in 1978!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 15, 2012, 12:38:53 PM
Quote
Harry Maxwell Harrison, the science fiction author best known as the author of the 1966 novel Make Room! Make Room!, which was made into the 1973 film Soylent Green, passed away at age 87. Harrison also wrote many other well-known science fiction novels in more than five decades as an SF author, most notably in series such as The Stainless Steel Rat, Deathworld and Bill, the Galactic Hero.

In addition to more than 50 novels, he wrote numerous shorter works, collected in such volumes as The Best of Harry Harrison (1976) and 50 in 50 (2001), and edited more than 30 science fiction anthologies.

Harrison actually began his science fiction career as an illustrator, including working on the classic EC Comics of the early 1950s (working primarily with Wally Wood) and providing spot illustrations for science fiction magazines such as Galaxy, and later writing the Flash Gordon newspaper comic (working with Dan Barry). After serving in the military in the 1940s, he had briefly attended art school, where he met a number of prominent comics artists.

He had entered the world of science fiction as a teenaged fan in the late 1930s, when he became one of the founders of the Queens chapter of the Science Fiction League, a New York-based fan organization, and contributed to fanzines of that period. Later he would become a member of the Hydra Club along with other young science fiction professionals, who included Isaac Asimov, Theodore Sturgeon, Lester del Rey, L. Sprague de Camp and Damon Knight.

He also began writing short science fiction stories in the 1950s, with his first story, "Rock Diver," appearing in the August 1951 issue of the science fiction magazine Worlds Beyond. He wrote and edited widely in the 1950s, including for "true confessions" magazines. His first science fiction novel was Deathworld (1960), set on a planet teeming with dangerous predatory life forms, which was followed by two sequels. His second novel, The Stainless Steel Rat (1961), began a light science fiction adventure series that Harrison continued for 13 more novels over the next 30 years. His satirical Bill, the Galactic Hero (1965) was followed by a period of more ambitious novels on serious themes, including Make Room! Make Room! (1966)—one of the finest novels on the theme of overpopulation—Captive Universe (1969) and In Our Hands the Stars (1970). Make Room! Make Room! became the basis for the popular science fiction movie Soylent Green in 1973.

In the 1960s and 1970s, Harrison also edited an impressive array of anthologies, including many best-of-the-year anthologies, several best-of-the-decade anthologies, and the short-lived but highly respected Nova series of original anthologies. He also edited, with Brian Aldiss, the ground-breaking nonfiction book Hell's Cartographers: Some Personal Histories of Science Fiction Writers (1975).

In the 1980s, Harrison wrote a major new trilogy, set in an alternate reality where intelligent dinosaurs evolved parallel to humans, beginning with West of Eden (1984), and continuing with Winter in Eden (1986) and Return to Eden (1988). In the 1990s, he wrote the fantasy trilogy The Hammer and the Cross, followed by the alternate history Stars and Stripes trilogy.

After moving from New York in the 1950s and living for periods in Mexico, England, Italy, Denmark and San Diego, Harrison and his family moved to Ireland in the mid-1970s, where he had lived since. He was predeceased by his wife, Joan Merkler, in 2002, and is survived by two children, son Todd and daughter Moira.

Harrison has won many awards and other honors in the field, including the 1973 Nebula Award for Best Dramatic Presentation for Soylent Green, which also won a Golden Scroll Award and was nominated for the Hugo Award in 1974, losing to Woody Allen's Sleeper. Two early novels were nominated for Hugo Awards, Deathworld (1961) and Planet of the Damned (1962), and his short story "By the Falls" was nominated for a Nebula Award in 1971. He also won a Sidewise Award for Alternate History for his Stars and Stripes trilogy.

He was inducted in 2004 into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in Lawrence, Kan., and also won the Inkpot Award for Outstanding Achievement in Science Fiction and Fantasy at Comic-Con International in San Diego that same year. He became a European Grand Master in 2006, and in 2009 he was presented the Damon Knight Science Fiction Grand Master Award by the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America, perhaps the greatest honor for any science fiction author.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 20, 2012, 07:55:41 AM
Wha?!

Quote
Tony Scott, the brilliant director of TRUE ROMANCE, THE LAST BOY SCOUT, CRIMSON TIDE, ENEMY OF THE STATE, TOP GUN and many more first-rate studio films, has committed suicide at the age of sixty-eight. According to KTLA, he jumped to his death from the Vincent Thomas Bridge near Long Beach.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 20, 2012, 08:24:48 AM
I did it to stop Top Gun 2.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 20, 2012, 08:35:35 AM
Great Society: Where 'Too Soon' isn't just an attitude. It's a way of life.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 20, 2012, 04:33:15 PM
Quote
Sad news today, TMZ is reporting that Phyllis Diller, the legendary comedian whose career spanned decades and entire evolution of modern comedy, has died. She was 95.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 20, 2012, 04:34:12 PM
Was she hit by someone falling from a bridge?

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 25, 2012, 04:20:11 PM
Icon...

Quote
The US astronaut Neil Armstrong has died at the age of 82, according reports in American media. He was the first man to walk on the surface of the moon.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 26, 2012, 09:14:53 AM
Woah...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 02, 2012, 05:13:52 PM
Quote
Sun Myung Moon dies at 92; Washington Times owner led the Unification Church

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/sun-myung-moon-dies-at-92-washington-times-owner-led-the-unification-church/2012/09/02/001b747a-f531-11e1-aab7-f199a16396cf_story.html (http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/sun-myung-moon-dies-at-92-washington-times-owner-led-the-unification-church/2012/09/02/001b747a-f531-11e1-aab7-f199a16396cf_story.html)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 03, 2012, 08:07:16 PM
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-207_162-57505279/actor-michael-clarke-duncan-dead-at-54/ (http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-207_162-57505279/actor-michael-clarke-duncan-dead-at-54/)

Quote
Actor Michael Clarke Duncan dead at 54

(CBS/AP) LOS ANGELES - Michael Clarke Duncan, the hulking, prolific character actor whose dozens of films included an Oscar-nominated performance as a death row inmate in "The Green Mile" and such other box office hits as "Armageddon," ''Planet of the Apes" and "Kung Fu Panda," is dead at age 54.

Clarke died Monday morning at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, where he was being treated for a heart attack, said his fiance, reality TV personality Rev. Omarosa Manigault, in a statement released by publicist Joy Fehily.

The muscular, 6-foot-4 Duncan, a former bodyguard who turned to acting in his 30s, "suffered a myocardial infarction on July 13 and never fully recovered," the statement said. "Manigault is grateful for all of your prayers and asks for privacy at this time. Celebrations of his life, both private and public, will be announced at a later date."

Film critic Jeffrey Lyons told CBS News Radio his large size didn't limit Duncan.

"He was an interesting actor and he made you forget about that," Lyons said. "He made you think the character looked like a big man rather than it was a big man trying to play the character."

In the spring of 2012, Clarke had appeared in a video for PETA, the animal rights organization, in which he spoke of how much better he felt since becoming a vegetarian three years earlier.

"I cleared out my refrigerator, about $5,000 worth of meat," he said. "I'm a lot healthier than I was when I was eating meat."

Duncan had a handful of minor roles before "The Green Mile" brought him an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor. The 1999 film, based on the Stephen King novel of the same name, starred Tom Hanks as a corrections officer at a penitentiary in the 1930s. Duncan played John Coffey, a convicted murderer with a surprisingly gentle demeanor and extraordinary healing powers.

Duncan's performance caught on with critics and moviegoers and he quickly became a favorite in Hollywood, appearing in several films a year. He owed some of his good fortune to Bruce Willis, who recommended Duncan for "The Green Mile" after the two appeared together in "Armageddon." Clarke would work with Willis again in "Breakfast of Champions," ''The Whole Nine Yards" and "Sin City."

His industrial-sized build was suited for everything from superhero films ("Daredevil") to comedy ("Talledega Nights," ''School for Scoundrels"). His gravelly baritone alone was good enough for several animated movies, including, "Kung Fu Panda," ''Delgo" and "Brother Bear." Among Clarke's television credits: "The Apprentice," ''The Finder," ''Two and a Half Men" and "The Suite Life of Zack and Cody."

Born in Chicago in 1957, Duncan was raised by a single mother whose resistance to his playing football led to his deciding he wanted to become an actor. But when his mother became ill, he dropped out of college, Alcorn State University, and worked as a ditch digger and bouncer to support her. By his mid-20s, he was in Los Angeles, where he looked for acting parts and became a bodyguard for Will Smith, Jamie Foxx and other stars. The murder of rapper Notorious B.I.G., for whom Duncan had been hired to protect before switching assignments, led him to quit his job and pursue acting full-time.

Early film and television credits, when he was usually cast as a bodyguard or bouncer, included "Bulworth," ''A Night at the Roxbury" and "The Players Club."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 04, 2012, 08:00:39 AM
Oh, wow... Now that's really sad. He was great.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 04, 2012, 09:11:54 AM
Yeah, I liked Reverend Moon too.

Oh, you mean Michael Clarke Duncan.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 04, 2012, 10:01:10 AM
Moon's one of those you can file under "he wasn't already dead?"
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on September 05, 2012, 01:36:59 AM
I guess we'll not see a The Finder resuscitation now.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 05, 2012, 07:52:11 AM
That's sad, too. This thread is sad.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 26, 2012, 12:58:48 PM
I almost filed this one under "Who?"

Quote
'Moon River' singer Andy Williams dies
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on September 27, 2012, 10:06:42 PM
Love that song.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 01, 2012, 11:25:16 AM
Blastr reports:


Quote
Michael O'Hare, the little-known actor who earned his place in sci-fi history when he joined the original cast of Babylon 5 in 1992, died Friday after suffering a heart attack several days earlier. He was 60.

Babylon 5 creator J. Michael Straczynski announced O'Hare's death on his official Facebook page Friday.

"I regret that I must convey the sad news that Michael O'Hare passed away today. He suffered a heart attack on Sunday and was in a coma until his passing this afternoon. This is a terrible loss for all B5 fans and everyone involved with the show wishes to convey their condolences to the O'Hare family. He was an amazing man."
A Chicago native, O'Hare earned notoriety in the theater before moving into television. He starred as Col. Jessup in the original production of Aaron Sorkin's stage play A Few Good Men, a role Jack Nicholson would later play on screen.

Though he made a number of guest appearances on high-profile shows like L.A. Law, Tales From the Darkside and Kate & Allie, Babylon 5 was O'Hare's first (and ultimately only) chance to lead the cast of a TV series. He led the crew of the titular space station as Cmdr. Jeffrey Sinclair for the show's first season, then left in what Straczynski described as a "mutual" and "amicable" split. Though he was replaced as commander of the station by Bruce Boxleitner's Capt. John Sheridan, Sinclair still had an important role to play in the series, and O'Hare appeared briefly in both seasons two and three of the show to wrap up his character's storyline.

After Babylon 5, O'Hare continued to act, but appeared on television only sporadically, most notably with two guest roles on Law & Order. He was never a star, or a household name, but to Babylon 5 fans he was something special. After seeing the outpouring of sympathy from fans following the announcement of O'Hare's death, his brother Mark posted a thank-you, which Straczynski shared.

"I want all of Mike's friends and fans a like to know that our family very much appreciates and thank you for all the kind thoughts and words. He was not only my brother but a great friend who I will miss terribly. I can tell you he loved life his craft and being on B5 and all those associated with the show from creator, cast, crew and fans."
O'Hare is the fourth member of Babylon 5's main cast to pass away since the series ended. Richard Biggs, who played Dr. Stephen Franklin throughout the show's run, died in 2004. Andreas Katsulas, who starred as G'Kar, died in 2006. And Jeff Conaway, who played security officer Zack Allan, passed away last year. With O'Hare's passing, Straczynski mused on his Facebook page about a B5 reunion in the great beyond.

"I can only assume from all this that someone in the afterlife has begun pre-production on a Babylon 5 movie," he said.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on October 15, 2012, 03:10:09 AM
Former Cambodian King, Sihanouk (at age 89).
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on October 18, 2012, 05:18:39 PM
We've missed quite a few of late, but here's one from my youth.

Quote
First adult film star Sylvia Kristel dies at 60

Sylvia Kristel, arguably the first adult film star, has died at the age of 60 after suffering a long battle with cancer.

"She died during the night during her sleep," her agent told the AFP.  She was admitted to a hospital in July after suffering a stroke, though she was first diagnosed with throat and lung cancer roughly ten years ago.

The Dutch actress, born in Utrecht, Holland, made waves around the world as the star of 1974 erotic French film "Emmanuelle." In the controversial film she played the woman after which it was named -- a young model Emmanuelle, married to a much older man. The plot revolves around the couple as they move to Bangkok. Kristel's character then engages in a number of extramarital affairs as her husband doesn't seem to mind.

The film garnered a major following, played for 11 years in a theater on the Champs-Elysees in Paris, and remains one of the most successful French films of all time. "Emmanuelle" also inspired a number of sequels in which Kristel also starred.

Kristel's performance in the "soft core" film even drew critical praise from Chicago Sun-Times critic Roger Ebert. He wrote in 1975: What makes the film work is the performance of Sylvia Kristel... [who] projects a certain vulnerability that makes several of the scenes work... The performers in most skin flicks seem so impervious to ordinary mortal failings, so blase in the face of the most outrageous sexual invention, that finally they just become cartoon characters. Kristel actually seems to be present in the film, and as absorbed in its revelations as we are. [via the BBC]

Kristel appeared in nearly 60 titles over the years, including television movies. She admitted to drug and alcohol addiction and experienced her share of bad relationships, later saying if she had it to do over again, she would have never entered those relationships -- with the exception of early boyfriend, Belgian author Hugo Claus.

Having won a few notable beauty pageants by the time she was 21, Claus is the one who initially encouraged Kristel to become an actress. The couple had a son, Arthur, in 1975.

Somewhat ironically, Kristel was educated in a convent and had a strict, religious upbringing -- something she fled from as a teenager when she moved to Amsterdam.

A private funeral will be held for Kristel, according to her agent.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 18, 2012, 06:07:44 PM
And McGovern's on deathwatch...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on October 18, 2012, 06:10:18 PM
One wonders if we'll countdown Mondale's or Dole's death throes.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 18, 2012, 06:11:15 PM
Actually...which ones have we missed? I haven't seen any big names come up.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on October 18, 2012, 06:13:24 PM
Arlen Specter is the only one that pops straight into my mind.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 18, 2012, 06:16:31 PM
Arlen Specter is the only one that pops straight into my mind.

A little surprising we did miss that... My news blackout has increased as we near the election...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 22, 2012, 11:49:21 AM
Sylvia Kristel. Better known as the original Emmanuelle of soft-core proto-Skinemax fame.

She's been fighting cancer for over a decade...only 60 years old.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on October 22, 2012, 12:26:54 PM
Uh...

We've missed quite a few of late, but here's one from my youth.

Quote
First adult film star Sylvia Kristel dies at 60

Sylvia Kristel, arguably the first adult film star, has died at the age of 60 after suffering a long battle with cancer.

"She died during the night during her sleep," her agent told the AFP.  She was admitted to a hospital in July after suffering a stroke, though she was first diagnosed with throat and lung cancer roughly ten years ago.

The Dutch actress, born in Utrecht, Holland, made waves around the world as the star of 1974 erotic French film "Emmanuelle." In the controversial film she played the woman after which it was named -- a young model Emmanuelle, married to a much older man. The plot revolves around the couple as they move to Bangkok. Kristel's character then engages in a number of extramarital affairs as her husband doesn't seem to mind.

The film garnered a major following, played for 11 years in a theater on the Champs-Elysees in Paris, and remains one of the most successful French films of all time. "Emmanuelle" also inspired a number of sequels in which Kristel also starred.

Kristel's performance in the "soft core" film even drew critical praise from Chicago Sun-Times critic Roger Ebert. He wrote in 1975: What makes the film work is the performance of Sylvia Kristel... [who] projects a certain vulnerability that makes several of the scenes work... The performers in most skin flicks seem so impervious to ordinary mortal failings, so blase in the face of the most outrageous sexual invention, that finally they just become cartoon characters. Kristel actually seems to be present in the film, and as absorbed in its revelations as we are. [via the BBC]

Kristel appeared in nearly 60 titles over the years, including television movies. She admitted to drug and alcohol addiction and experienced her share of bad relationships, later saying if she had it to do over again, she would have never entered those relationships -- with the exception of early boyfriend, Belgian author Hugo Claus.

Having won a few notable beauty pageants by the time she was 21, Claus is the one who initially encouraged Kristel to become an actress. The couple had a son, Arthur, in 1975.

Somewhat ironically, Kristel was educated in a convent and had a strict, religious upbringing -- something she fled from as a teenager when she moved to Amsterdam.

A private funeral will be held for Kristel, according to her agent.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 22, 2012, 03:45:33 PM
Haha! And on the same page! Monday morning coming down...

I blame the Droid!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 15, 2012, 06:09:54 PM
Smurfette!

Quote
it has been announced that voice actress Lucille Bliss passed away last week, on Nov. 8th, at age 96. She was best known as the voice of Smurfette in "The Smurfs", and started early in television history as the title role in the 1950 show Crusader Rabbit. She also had roles in other popular animated programs such as Avatar: The Last Airbender, Invader Zim, The Flintstones, The ABC Saturday Superstar Movie production of "Oliver and the Artful Dodger," and Duck Dodgers. She also appeared in character parts for live-action shows at times, such as Battlestar Galactica, Nash Bridges and Nurses. Plus film roles, of course, in Disney's Cinderella, in The Secret of NIMH, and Robots.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 25, 2012, 09:57:42 AM
Larry Hagman!

Which is a bummer...I secretly enjoyed the Dallas reboot and though the old boy still had some fire. What a shame.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 12, 2012, 10:30:45 AM
Ravi Shankar.

Quote
The legendary sitar player, who taught Beatle George Harrison how to play the stringed instrument and brought Indian music to the West, passed away at age 92 near his home in southern California, according to his wife Sukanya and daughter Anoushka Shankar, who were by his side.

Shankar was also the father of jazz singer Norah Jones. He is also survived by three grandchildren and four great-grandchildren, according to his record label East Meets West Music

His health had lagged over the past year, according to a statement from his record label, and he underwent heart-valve replacement surgery last Thursday.
"Unfortunately, despite the best efforts of the surgeons and doctors taking care of him, his body was not able to withstand the strain of the surgery," his wife and daughter said.

In the 1960's he took Eastern music mainstream in the West, lending ethereal, spiritual sounds to the Fab Four through his friendship with Harrison. Virtuoso performances at Monterey in 1967 and Woodstock in 1969 helped cement his place in Western musical history as an ambassador of Eastern wisdom to a generation looking for new values.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 18, 2012, 10:54:59 AM
Daniel Inouye! The old Hawaiian guard dies...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on December 21, 2012, 09:12:32 AM
I thought he was from Alaska...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 21, 2012, 10:37:16 AM
I thought he was from Alaska...

Same difference!

Actually, those Alaskan senators are like cardboard cutouts.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 21, 2012, 12:13:22 PM
Hawaii is where we quarantined all the pod people in '58.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 27, 2012, 10:09:57 PM
"Stormin'" Norman Schwarzkopf

There's been a few deaths of late that we've missed. Jack Klugman being the most renowned I think.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 28, 2012, 06:56:42 AM
"Stormin'" Norman Schwarzkopf

There's been a few deaths of late that we've missed. Jack Klugman being the most renowned I think.

Yeah, we had a run at Christmas.

Surprised by Schwarzkopf, though.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on December 31, 2012, 01:58:24 PM
For a while it looked like Papa Bush and Stormin Norman might face San Pedro at the same time   :biggrin:
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 01, 2013, 01:57:03 PM
I know, right?

Though the Bush I deathwatch illustrates everything wrong with American media. I though Babs "Don't play the harps yet" remark was a pretty good response.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 11, 2013, 12:47:09 PM
Good night, General Kala.

Quote
Italian actress Mariangela Melato dies at 71

ROME (AP) — Italian actress Mariangela Melato, known for her critically acclaimed performance as a spoiled socialite stranded with a sailor she had tormented in the 1974 film comedy "Swept Away," has died in a Rome hospital at age 71.

The Antea hospital said she died Friday. The LaPresse news agency said she was suffering from pancreatic cancer.

The blond actress had most success in a series of films in the 1970s directed by Italian Lina Wertmuller, including "The Seduction of Mimi" and "Love and Anarchy."

One of the most acclaimed was the role of a socialite who finds herself stranded with Giancarlo Giannini. Her role was played by Madonna in a 2002 remake.

Melato had less success in Hollywood roles, which included a supporting part in "Flash Gordon" in 1980.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 11, 2013, 01:37:10 PM
Flash! Ah-ah!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 25, 2013, 02:09:28 PM
http://www.blastr.com/2013-2-24/bbc-designer-who-first-brought-whos-daleks-life-dies-84

Quote
Ray Cusick, the BBC designer who created the look of Doctor Who's most iconic nemesis, the Daleks, died in his sleep Thursday. He was 84.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 05, 2013, 06:10:44 PM
Bam!

Quote
Hugo Chavez dies
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on March 06, 2013, 07:34:58 AM
Interesting to see if and when political violence breaks out in the Bolivaran Republic in the wake of his passing. The country is much more polarized than Cuba and the other lands in the region run by Lefties.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 06, 2013, 09:10:34 AM
Hopefully it'll be fun. We're running out of people to use drones on.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 06, 2013, 11:01:27 AM
Oh, there's still plenty of opium and oil producing countries in the middle east and central Asia.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 06, 2013, 11:04:58 AM
Oh, there's still plenty of opium and oil producing countries in the middle east and central Asia.

Yeah, each with an infrastructure that almost rivals West Virginia.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 19, 2013, 05:58:51 PM
I'm a little shocked by this...


http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2013/03/18/174646022/jason-molina-a-folksinger-who-embodied-the-best-of-the-blues-has-died

Quote
Blues music is supposed to be cathartic — a way to process and package pain in ways that make it palatable; to take our hurt and ache, set it outside ourselves, give it a tune and rhythm that makes it tangible and real yet somehow less terrifying.

Jason Molina, who died Saturday at 39, of what his label, Secretly Canadian, calls natural causes, wasn't a blues singer, exactly. In a prolific underground career spanning more than 15 years, his songs mostly took on the form of confessional folk music — a man and a guitar, or a man and a band, singing bruised and barren songs of longing and lost salvation like so many others before and since.

He recorded under a variety of names — his own, Songs: Ohia and Magnolia Electric Co., to name a few — but in all, he wrote in his own unique symbolic shorthand. The moon, for example, lurked in countless Molina songs as a figure of both menace and light. In one of my favorites, the 2006 solo song "Get Out Get Out Get Out," he sums up so much of his work and worldview with a string of elegant laments: "Something must have happened to both of us / Something must have happened, something always does ... I lived low enough so the moon wouldn't waste its light on me."

Still, Molina's songs wove that self-pitying sadness — songs of a man cowering under a sky he cursed, or peering into horizons that seemed empty — into expressions of bracing, strangely soothing beauty. His open, aching voice could convey overwhelming emotion with the slightest inflection; if you loved his music, you'd swear you could feel a word or phrase or hook in your blood.

I got to meet Molina once, back in 2005. I'd heard stories that he could be prickly and unapproachable, to the point where I hesitated to say hello, but decided to suck it up as an act of selfishness; I just couldn't resist the chance to tell him how much I'd come to love his music. The man was sweet and warm to the point where, when we parted, he reached into his bag and handed me a sheet of paper. He'd been scribbling some strange drawings — a little reminiscent of Dinosaur Jr's album covers, but primitive and drawn in black pen — on the back of loose paperwork while bored on tour, and figured I might like one as a keepsake. He was right.

That sheepish generosity, coming from someone whose relationship with the world could be so difficult, stuck with me, and always will.

In 2007, I recorded a piece for Morning Edition to profile a then-new box set of Molina material; before his publicly acknowledged struggle with alcoholism and money woes started slowing him down a couple years later, the singer churned out so many songs, he couldn't be contained by just an album each year. As I was putting the story together, I reached out to the singer Glen Hansard, with whom I'd once exchanged stories of shared Molina fandom. (Hansard recorded a split 7" with the singer, and a few times brought him along on tour with his band The Frames.)

"There's something about the sensibility of what he does that's so incredibly traditional, and yet so modern," said Hansard, who discovered Molina's music while driving late at night, having bought one of his CDs thinking it was by someone else. "It's like that Leonard Cohen thing: incredibly melancholic music that for some reason leaves you with a smile — not a smile, but leaves you with a kind of sense of hope."

That lingering thread of hope which survives in Molina's music is what I try to embrace in his music; it's the idea that the singer lived to process his hurt and put it into all the beautiful, meaningful songs he could while he still could. I never thought a day would come when Molina's music could get any sadder, but here we are. I'll still celebrate it — and still find warmth and comfort in its worn, weary grace. But it hurts like hell that he's gone
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 20, 2013, 06:06:08 PM
Quote
James Herbert, OBE: 1943-2013

We’ve just received word that legendary horror writer James Herbert has passed away at the age of 69.

After publishing his first novel, The Rats, in 1974, Herbert went on to write twenty-three horror novels, including The Fog, The Magic Cottage, Others, and The Secret of Crickley Hall (the last of which was aired as a three-part serial on BBC One in late 2012). Published in 34 languages, including Russian and Chinese, Herbert’s novels have sold over 54 million copies worldwide.

His latest novel, Ash, was published in the United states in December 2012. Herbert was awarded the OBE in 2010, the same year that he was made Grand Master of Horror by the World Horror Convention.

Whether he was conjuring up giant rats or exploring alternate timelines, Herbert’s prose was exhilarating. He was no stranger to a kind of dark humor either, once describing his novel Creed as his version of “Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein.”

James Herbert was a cherished icon of genre fiction; he will be greatly missed
.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 20, 2013, 07:54:55 PM
I've been wanting to read 'The Fog' for years.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on March 21, 2013, 11:24:01 AM
This "Obit Lineup" thread is morbid.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 21, 2013, 11:39:39 AM
This "Obit Lineup" thread is morbid.

Would you say...funereal?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on March 21, 2013, 12:45:53 PM
This "Obit Lineup" thread is morbid.

Would you say...funereal?

Better than venereal.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 21, 2013, 01:17:00 PM
Oh, and Harry Reems died...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 21, 2013, 01:55:51 PM
Oh, and Harry Reems died...

Time for a Deep Throat conspiracy theory!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on March 22, 2013, 12:52:31 AM
That would be hard to swallow.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 03, 2013, 10:57:22 AM
Jess Franco...

http://variety.com/2013/film/news/jess-franco-1200332021/

Quote
Jess Franco, the prolific Spanish filmmaker who became renowned for his low-budget cult films, died in Malaga, Spain, of heart complications. He was 82.

Franco’s feature pic debut came in 1959 with “We Are 18 Years Old,” but the helmer found more mainstream success with 1962′s “The Awful Dr. Orlof,” which received wide distribution Stateside and in Blighty. He is best known for his contributions to the cinema fantastique genre, which veered away from the mainstream and employed supernatural phenomena in otherwise realistic narratives. Notable credits include “Necronomicon,” (1967), “Count Dracula” (1969), “Vampyros Lesbos” (1970), “Dracula vs. Frankenstein” (1971), and “Oasis of the Zombies” (1983).

The auteur steered the 1960s Spanish horror boom, and even in the face of fascist censorship, placed sex, blood and gore at the front and center of his motion pics.

Born Jesus Franco on May 12, 1930, in Madrid, Spain, the would-be cineaste got his start composing music at age six and followed that passion to the Real Conservatorio de Madrid, where he studied piano and harmony. Franco penned work as an easy-read novelist before entering the Instituto de Investigaciones y Experiencias Cinematograicas and enrolling at the I.D.H.E.C. (U. of Sorbonne), where he studied helming techniques.

Back in Spain, Franco began composing and worked at Agata Films S.A. as a production manager and scribe. And when the censorship curtain on the home front was raised in the ’70s, Franco’s foray into bizarre filmmaking blossomed. Additional credits include “Succubus” (1968), which was nommed for the Festival of Berlin, and the Christopher Lee-starrer “Count Dracula” (1969). Franco also worked frequently with thesp Soledad Miranda and wife Lina Romay.

Auteur’s career spanned nearly six decades, and Franco snagged an honorary Goya award in 2009. Franco’s final work, “Al Pereira vs The Alligator Women,” opened last month in Spain.

Franco was predeceased last year by Romay.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 04, 2013, 04:53:22 PM
Roger Ebert... This one stings.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/roger-ebert-dies-film-critic-406274 (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/roger-ebert-dies-film-critic-406274)

Quote
Critic Roger Ebert Dies at 70

The most famous film critic in history, the Chicago legend worked at the Sun-Times for nearly 50 years; a thumbs-up from him on TV could make or break a movie.

Roger Ebert, the ardent, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who put his indelible thumbprint on the history of film criticism forged from spending a lifetime at the movies, has died, the Chicago Sun-Times has reported. He was 70.

In early December, the most famous movie critic of all time described his latest ailment, “a slight and nearly invisible hairline fracture involving my left femur” that immobilized him. “I didn’t fall. I didn’t break it. It just sort of ... happened to itself,” he said. In April, he revealed that the fracture was cancer and that he was undergoing radiation treatment and cutting back on his work.

Since 1967, Ebert served as the film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times (his final review, in which he described Stephenie Meyer’s The Host as having a one-note structure that “robs it of possibilities for dramatic tension,” ran online March 27.)

He gained nationwide fame when he and Gene Siskel -- the film critic for the Sun-Times’ crosstown rival Chicago Tribune -- were paired on the Tribune Entertainment syndicated show At the Movies, which debuted in 1982. (The two had created and starred on a similar show, Sneak Previews, for the Chicago PBS station in 1975.) In 1986, they left to create Siskel & Ebert & the Movies for Disney’s Buena Vista Entertainment.

The show, airing on Saturday nights around dinnertime in most major markets, demystified and popularized film criticism as the two chatted and traded opinions after clips of movies were shown. For the Buena Vista edition, Siskel and Ebert came up with their signature "thumbs-up/thumbs-down" appraisals; two thumbs-up (and later two big thumbs-up) was as good as a movie could get.

“Two thumbs-up would appear in a lot of movie ads, so Gene and I trademarked that phrase -- we didn’t trademark our thumbs; I’ve read that a lot,” Ebert recalled in a 2005 interview with the Archive of American Television. “If you go through all sorts of databases, you find that the concept of ‘two thumbs-up’ did not exist until we did it. Before that, things got a thumbs-up, but they didn’t get two thumbs-up.”

Did he enjoy being quoted in print ads? “Any critic who cares about whether he’s quoted in an ad or not must have a bubble for a brain,” he said.

As a tandem, Siskel and Ebert were readily identifiable in a Laurel and Hardy kind of way. Ebert was short, plump, mop-headed and wore glasses; Siskel was tall, thin and balding. They often disagreed in their opinions, and their verbal jousts could be funny. On camera, they often got under each other’s skin. The two, though, always professed to be pals off the set.

After Siskel died of a brain tumor in 1999, Ebert teamed on TV with fellow Sun-Times writer Richard Roeper until 2006, when Ebert lost part of his jaw to thyroid cancer, rendering him unable to speak. He would be fitted with a prosthetic chin to make him look more like his former self. Without an ounce of self-pity, Ebert said he looked like “the thing that jumps out of that guy’s intestines in Alien.”

Ebert had undergone surgery in February 2002 for thyroid cancer and had another operation 12 months later after cancer was found in his salivary gland.

Ebert, of Irish, Dutch and German descent, was born June 18, 1942, in Urbana, Ill. He became a sports reporter for his high school paper, then became an editor and columnist for The Daily Illini at the University of Illinois. His father died when he was a freshman in college.

Ebert began his professional career as a copy boy at the Sun-Times but soon impressed his older colleagues with his knowledge of cinema. Soon, the 25-year-old at the end of the desk was the paper’s movie critic.

“When they looked around the newsroom, I was young and wore my hair long,” Ebert told The Hollywood Reporter's chief film reviewer Todd McCarthy in 2011. “I had written a couple of features about movie actors and obituaries on Walt Disney and Jayne Mansfield. I had no formal training and no college classes in film; I was an English lit major. I learned on the job and got a lot of feedback from Chicago film lovers who were not much younger than I was.”

In his candid 2011 memoir, Life Itself, Ebert wrote that he eventually would follow the advice of a film critic he admired, Pauline Kael of The New Yorker: “I go into the movie, I watch it, and I ask myself what happened to me.”

He spoke lovingly of actors: “I am, beneath everything else, a fan. I was fixed in this mode as a young boy and am awed by people who take the risks of performance.”

Ebert picked his top film for every year since 1967, and the bunch includes Bonnie and Clyde, Cries and Whispers, Small Change, Apocalypse Now, House of Games, Do the Right Thing, Malcolm X, Hoop Dreams, Eve’s Bayou, Being John Malkovich, Minority Report, Pan’s Labyrinth, A Separation and, for 2012, Argo. Citizen Kane and La Dolce Vita were among his most favorite films.

About writer-director John Cassavetes’ emotional 1974 drama A Woman Under the Influence, Ebert wrote in his review:
“There is no safe resolution at the end of a Cassavetes film. You feel the tumult of life goes on uninterrupted, that each film is a curtain raised on a play already in progress. The characters seek to give love, receive it, express it, comprehend it. They are prevented by various addictions: booze, drugs, sex, self-doubt. Self-help gurus talk about ‘playing old tapes.’ Cassavetes writes characters whose old tapes are like prison cells; their dialogue is like a call for help from between the bars.”

Ebert also could be acerbic.

On North (1994), directed by Rob Reiner and a young Elijah Wood: “I hated this movie. Hated hated hated hated hated this movie. Hated it. Hated every simpering stupid vacant audience-insulting moment of it. Hated the sensibility that thought anyone would like it. Hated the implied insult to the audience by its belief that anyone would be entertained by it.”
On An Alan Smithee Film: Burn Hollywood Burn (1997), starring Ryan O’Neal, Coolio and Eric Idle: “In taking his name off the film, [director] Arthur Hiller has wisely distanced himself from the disaster, but on the basis of what’s on the screen I cannot, frankly, imagine any version of this film that I would want to see. The only way to save this film would be to trim 86 minutes.”

On Tommy Boy (1995), starring David Spade and Chris Farley: “[This] is one of those movies that plays like an explosion down at the screenplay factory. You can almost picture a bewildered office boy, his face smudged with soot, wandering through the ruins and rescuing pages at random. Too bad they didn’t mail them to the insurance company instead of filming them.”

In 1975, he became the first film critic to win a Pulitzer Prize.

Ebert acknowledged that his reviews could determine the fate of a movie. He once noted that a great review he and Siskel gave My Dinner With Andre (1981) -- the review aired on their PBS show on a Friday in New York -- drove audiences to see the obscure film that weekend, and that momentum, the producers told him, kept it in theaters for a year.

“We could tell the intellectual or the film buff, ‘Here’s a popular movie you might like.’ We could tell the popular-movie [fanatic], ‘Here’s a documentary or an art film or a foreign film you might like,’ ” he said in the Archive of American Television interview. “We sold each kind of movie to its opposite audience.”

Ebert returned to TV most recently as managing editor and reviewer for the syndicated PBS show Ebert Presents At the Movies, which aired its last show in December 2011. He also became a persistent blogger.

In addition to his voluminous movie reviews -- one estimate says the number is more than 5,000 -- and essays, Ebert was a prolific author who penned 17 books.

Early in his reviewing career, Ebert moonlighted as a scriptwriter and gained a degree of notoriety for writing three scripts for mammary-movie maven Russ Meyer. He took a six-week leave of absence to pen Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (1970), then scripted (under the pseudonym Reinhold Timme) Up! in 1976 and (as R. Hyde) Beneath the Valley of the Ultra-Vixens in 1979. That year, after a period of alcohol abuse, he had his last drink with the help of Alcoholics Anonymous.

Ebert also enjoyed doing movie cameos, appearing in such film fare as Pitch (1997), Junket Whore (1998), Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 (2000), All the Love You Cannes! (2002) and Abby Singer (2003). On TV, he visited late-night hosts David Letterman and Jay Leno often and voiced an animated version of himself on The Critic, starring Jon Lovitz, in 1995.

Ebert always was identified as a son of Chicago. A portion of Erie Street in the city was renamed Siskel & Ebert Way in 1995. Two years later, he was inducted into the Chicago Journalism Hall of Fame, joining such Windy City luminaries as Ben Hecht and Mike Royko. He received the Carl Sandburg Literary Award from the Chicago Public Library in 2011.
In 1999, Ebert founded EbertFest, a film festival held each spring in Champaign, Ill., home of his alma mater. He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2005 and four years later was named an honorary life member of the Directors Guild of America.

In September, the Sundance Institute said it would award Ebert with its second Vanguard Leadership Award, in recognition of his advocacy of independent cinema.

And Martin Scorsese said soon afterward that he would executive produce a documentary about Ebert, based on the Life Itself memoir, that would premiere at the 2013 Telluride Film Festival. Ebert wrote one of the first positive reviews for Scorsese’s feature debut Who’s That Knocking at My Door (1967), helping to kick-start his career.

Ebert, who vowed not to marry until his mother died (she died in 1987), wed civil rights attorney Charlie “Chaz” Hammelsmith in 1993. They had no children. Before they married, he went on a couple of dates with a fellow Chicago legend, Oprah Winfrey, who says he convinced her to take her TV show into syndication.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 04, 2013, 05:06:12 PM
I'm starting to dread this thread.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 08, 2013, 10:18:50 AM
Thatcher!

Quote
Former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher, the grocer’s daughter whose overpowering personality, bruising political style and free-market views transformed Britain and transfixed America through the 1980s, died Monday after a stroke, her spokesman said in a statement. She was 87.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 08, 2013, 11:09:06 AM
The Iron Lady falls!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 08, 2013, 02:35:34 PM
Oh!

Quote
Former ‘Mouseketeer’ Annette Funicello Dead at 70
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 17, 2013, 01:25:04 PM

http://www.tor.com/blogs/2013/04/star-wars-actor-richard-leparmentier-1946-2013

Quote
Actor and screenwriter Richard LeParmentier, who played Admiral Motti in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, has passed away. In his role as the brash, arrogant Imperial Officer who dares to defy Darth Vader, LeParmentier was the unlucky target of Vader’s throat-crushing displeasure and the recipient of one of the most chilling, iconic lines of the series: “I find your lack of faith disturbing.” Since then, Admiral Motti has been seen as both a symbol of the Empire’s hubris and an unforgettable example of the power of the Force at its darkest…

In addition to his memorable appearance in Star Wars, LeParmentier made his mark as a character actor in other blockbuster genre films including Rollerball, Octopussy, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, and Superman II (in which he co-starred with his then-wife, Sarah Douglas, who played the villainess Ursa). An American actor who worked primarily in England, he had concentrated more on screenwriting, along with some video game voice work, since the mid-90s. A fan favorite who regularly appeared at Star Wars conventions, LeParmentier will be greatly missed.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 22, 2013, 12:17:49 PM
When icons of my youth die, it really gets to me...

Quote
Divinyls singer Chrissy Amphlett dies

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-04-22/divinyls-singer-chrissy-amphlett-dies/4644172 (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-04-22/divinyls-singer-chrissy-amphlett-dies/4644172)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 03, 2013, 11:19:36 AM
We've missed a few... Chris Kelly of Kriss Kross. Drugs.

Some vintage heavy metal:
Quote
Slayer's Jeff Hanneman died of liver failure in a California hospital on Thursday; he was 49. The guitarist co-founded the pioneering metal group in 1981, penning the lyrics to many songs along the way. Hanneman was beset with a rare flesh-eating disease called necrotizing fasciitis in 2011, though he was said to have recovered. The band has continued touring and recording records since its inception, releasing World Painted Blood, its tenth studio album, in 2009.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 07, 2013, 02:14:44 PM
Just heard Ray Harryhausen died. I honestly thought he was already dead.

Time to watch Clash of the Titans!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 07, 2013, 02:48:31 PM
Just heard Ray Harryhausen died. I honestly thought he was already dead.

Time to watch Clash of the Titans!

Yeah. Wasn't he, like, old in 1960?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 20, 2013, 06:54:26 PM
Ray Manzarek of The Doors. I'm going to go listen to "The End" and weep.

https://thedoors.com/news/ray-manzarek-founding-member-doors-passes-away-74-4872 (https://thedoors.com/news/ray-manzarek-founding-member-doors-passes-away-74-4872)

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on June 08, 2013, 02:32:18 PM
The Night Stalker kicked the bucket at age 53. See you in Disneyland, Dick Ramirez  :cool:
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on June 09, 2013, 11:46:38 PM
Banks, also.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 11, 2013, 05:31:41 AM
So sad about Banks...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Sirharles on June 19, 2013, 09:43:22 PM
James Gandolfini died.

http://tv.yahoo.com/news/james-gandolfini---the-sopranos--star--dead-at-51-234433183.html
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 20, 2013, 07:49:28 AM
James Gandolfini died.

http://tv.yahoo.com/news/james-gandolfini---the-sopranos--star--dead-at-51-234433183.html

Woah...

Man. It's because I marathoned the show, isn't it?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 24, 2013, 03:14:31 PM
http://www.vulture.com/2013/06/family-ties-creator-gary-david-goldberg-dies.html

Quote
Longtime television producer Gary David Goldberg, best known for creating Family Ties, died of brain cancer in California yesterday, according to several outlets. He was 68.

Goldberg got his start on the short-lived Norman Lear sitcom The Dumplings in 1976 and went on to write for Alice, The Bob Newhart Show, The Tony Randall Show, M*A*S*H*, and Lou Grant, among others. In 1982, he created the megahit and cultural touchstone Family Ties, which ran for seven seasons, and in 1991 he launched the critically beloved, largely autobiographical series Brooklyn Bridge. Then, in 1996, Goldberg co-created a second Michael J. Fox hit with Spin City.
Goldberg won his first Emmy in 1979, for Lou Grant, and his second in 1987, for Family Ties, and he picked up five other nominations along the way. He won two Humanitas prizes and both Producers Guild and Writers Guild awards.

If you watched a lot of TV in the eighties, you'd recognize not just Goldberg's comedic voice but his actual voice: He's the guy saying "sit, Ubu, sit" in the title card for his production company, Ubu Productions.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on June 24, 2013, 09:16:44 PM
Sha la la la.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 24, 2013, 10:09:40 PM
Richard Matheson died.

I'm going to go hold my copy of 'I Am Legend' and cry.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 25, 2013, 12:32:03 AM
I'm starting to dread this thread...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on June 26, 2013, 03:49:14 AM
I had a dream Mick Jagger died... bets on, now!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 22, 2013, 03:13:46 PM
Quote
Dennis Farina -- who starred as Det. Joe Fontana on "Law & Order" -- died today in Scottsdale, Arizona after suffering a blood clot in his lung. He was 69.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 08, 2013, 07:05:57 PM
Quote
'Five Easy Pieces' Actress Karen Black Dies at 74

She went on to become a horror icon in movies like Trilogy of Terror and House of 1000 Corpses.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 01, 2013, 02:12:41 PM
Quote
David Frost, Famed President Richard Nixon Interviewer Dies at 74
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 01, 2013, 05:30:58 PM
And we can put Mandela on deathwatch.

And we lost Seamus Heaney! Also 74...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on September 02, 2013, 12:37:20 PM
This is very local in flavor, but if you've been to the 9:30 club in the past 15 years, you've probably noticed this guy:

http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/blogs/artsdesk/music/2013/09/02/josh-burdette-930-club-manager-and-crew-chief-has-died/
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 02, 2013, 01:26:13 PM
That's really sad. 

A buddy of mine worked at the 9:30 in the 90s and I had a beer with "the big guy" a time or two. Never knew his name, but he couldn't have been a nicer dude.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 02, 2013, 06:34:54 PM
Wow...that is sad.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 03, 2013, 09:26:18 AM
Wow...

Quote
Tom Clancy, who arguably created the genre of military-techno thriller, died yesterday. He was 66 and was being treated in a Baltimore hospital for an undisclosed illness.

In the early 1980s, Clancy was an insurance agent in rural Maryland who wrote his first blockbuster, The Hunt for Red October, in his spare time. The manuscript was rejected by major publishers, which led him to approach the Naval Institute Press, in Annapolis, which had never published a novel. The Press took a chance with the book--and it was an immediate hit, helped in part by favorable comments from President Reagan, who hosted Clancy at the White House.

Berkley published the paperback of Hunt for Red October, and Clancy moved to Putnam for all his subsequent books. Clancy churned out blockbusters regularly, many of which featured CIA analyst Jack Ryan, who first surfaced in Hunt for Red October. Some of his titles also became blockbuster movies, including Hunt for Red October, Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger. Clancy also set up a video game company and became a part-owner of the Baltimore Orioles. More than 100 million copies of his books are in print. Command Authority, another Clancy novel starring Jack Ryan, written with Mark Greanery, is scheduled to be published December 3.

Deborah Grosvenor, the editor who bought Hunt for Red October, told the New York Times that she had difficulty at first convincing her boss to publish the book because the author was unknown and Naval Institute Press had never published fiction.

She recalled: "I said, 'I think we have a potential best seller here, and if we don't grab this thing, somebody else would.' " Clancy, she said, "had this innate storytelling ability, and his characters had this very witty dialogue. The gift of the Irish or whatever it was, the man could tell a story."

The Day recalled Clancy's loyalty to the Booksmith, the New London, Conn., bookstore that closed in 2000 and was the first store to host an event by the unknown author. The late owner, Judy Reed, got a galley of The Hunt for Red October from a Naval Institute Press rep at the ABA convention in Dallas in 1984. "She and her husband [Frank Diener] stayed up, reading it that night," the Day wrote. "The next day, she told the publisher they wanted the author in their store--they knew they could sell this submarine-focused techno-thriller in southeastern Connecticut, home of the Naval Submarine Base and Electric Boat."

Clancy was so happy with his first event--at which he sold about 75 copies of his book--that he returned for signings of every new book, Rich Swanson, who was a manager and then owner of the Booksmith, recalled. One year, Clancy held signings only at the Booksmith and West Point. By the time of his last signing at the store before it closed, he signed some 1,500 books. "On one level, I kind of owe it to them, and on another level, I come here for luck," Clancy told the Day in 1996.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Sirharles on October 03, 2013, 02:15:08 PM
He did okay with his books...enough money that I'm sure he and his family, for generations,  will never have to work again.  But it wasn't until he sold his name and rights to Ubisoft for the Splinter Cell series that he made his serious coin.  At one time, the guy was in line to buy the Minnesota Vikings.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 18, 2013, 11:02:10 PM
Wow.... Lexa Doig.

Did you just discover her? Because, yes. I spent lots of time thinking about her. Get some episodes of Andromeda under your belt. Cute, naive ship's avatar in tight leather!

Here, this will lighten the thread a bit...

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on October 27, 2013, 05:44:55 PM
Lou Reed died.

Excuse me while I go fetal for a few hours.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 28, 2013, 02:29:10 PM
What? How'd I miss that...oh my god.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 04, 2013, 02:30:36 PM
Phyllis Diller died at 95. I already thought she was dead.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 19, 2013, 07:23:14 AM
Syd Field, screenwriting guru died the other day.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 01, 2013, 05:33:37 AM
Quote
Paul Walker, 'Fast & Furious' Star, Dead in Car Crash at 40

Paul Walker, the edgy action hero with all-American good looks who became an international star with "The Fast & the Furious" movie franchise, has died in a fiery car collision in Southern California. He was 40 years old.

The sad news was confirmed Saturday night by Walker's camp via the actor's official Twitter account.


According to the statement put out by Walker's team and also posted on Facebook, the actor was "attending a charity event for his organization Reach Out Worldwide. He was a passenger in a friend's car.

"We appreciate your patience as we too are stunned and saddened beyond belief by this news," the statement continued. "Thank you for keeping his family and friends in your prayers during this very difficult time. We will do our best to keep you apprised on where to send condolences."

The identity of the second victim, a male, has not been released by authorities; but numerous reports have identified the driver as Roger Rodas, the owner of Walker's auto-racing team, Always Evolving.

“Him and his buddy, his brother in arms at heart, just decided to joyride, take a spin," Antonio Holmes, an onlooker at the event who identified himself as a friend of Walker's, told the local Santa Clarita Valley Signal newspaper. "Something we all do. We're all car enthusiasts. ... We’re all here driving, enjoying each other, and God must’ve needed help."

According to witnesses, the red Porsche Carrera GT carrying Walker and his friend lost control and slammed into a tree and then a light pole. Walker, an unapologetic car lover, had been participating in the "Winter Drive" for Reach Out Worldwide, a toy drive and car meet charity event for disadvantaged children. Walker was also involved in humanitarian efforts in Chile and Haiti after the devastating earthquakes in both countries.

"Speed was a factor in the solo vehicle collision," the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department said in a updated statement late Saturday.

Earlier, the sheriff's department and county coroner confirmed that two people were pronounced dead at the scene of the crash in Santa Clarita, north of Los Angeles, around 3:30 p.m. PT.

"When they arrived, deputies found the vehicle engulfed in flames. The Los Angeles County Fire Department responded, extinguished the fire and subsequently located two victims inside the vehicle," Sheriff's Deputy Kim Manatt said in a statement. "The victims were pronounced dead at the scene. The cause of the collision is under investigation."

The tall, blond-haired, blue-eyed heartthrob was a California native, hailing from the L.A. suburb of Glendale. He began appearing in TV commercials when he was just a toddler. He guest starred on shows like "Highway to Heaven" and "Charles in Charge" as a teen, and scored his first leading role in 1998's "Meet the Deedles." This lead to higher profile roles in features like "Pleasantville," "Varsity Blues," and "She's All That" in the late '90s before cementing his status as a leading man in 2001's "The Fast and the Furious."

Walker starred in all but the third installment of the "Fast & Furious" movies, including the seventh chapter which is still in production and scheduled for release next summer. He also received critical acclaim for his performances in 2006's "Running Scared" and in Clint Eastwood's WWII drama, "Flags of Our Fathers." His next film, "Hours," about the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, is scheduled to open on Dec. 13.

"Fast" running mate Vin Diesel posted an image of him and Walker on Instagram with the caption: "Brother I will miss you very much. I am absolutely speechless. Heaven has gained a new Angel. Rest in Peace."

In a brief statement, Universal, the studio behind the "Fast" franchise, also mourned one of its top stars: "All of us at Universal are heartbroken. Paul was truly one of the most beloved and respected members of our studio family for 14 years, and this loss is devastating to us, to everyone involved with the 'Fast and Furious' films, and to countless fans. We send our deepest and most sincere condolences to Paul's family."

Walker is survived by his 15-year-old daughter, Meadow.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 02, 2013, 08:11:40 PM
That totally ruins Fast & Furious 37 and 38, both coming out this month ahead of next month's Fast & Furious 39.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on December 04, 2013, 09:25:59 AM
Bob Denver

http://www.today.com/id/9230080/ns/today-today_entertainment/t/gilligan-star-bob-denver-dies-age/
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 04, 2013, 10:48:55 AM
Aww...little buddy.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 04, 2013, 03:21:32 PM
Wait. Hasn't he been dead for awhile?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 04, 2013, 03:23:11 PM
Wait. Hasn't he been dead for awhile?

Haha! Took a closer look at Reggie's link:


Quote
updated 9/6/2005 6:16:30 PM ET


(http://www.greatsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/youarehere.gif)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on December 04, 2013, 09:39:48 PM
Oh Jeez.  :fajwat:
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 05, 2013, 06:07:37 PM
Mandela!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on December 06, 2013, 08:04:11 AM
Mandela!

He never did find out what Winnie was burying in the garden.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 07, 2013, 06:03:40 PM
Oh, wow!

Quote
Sad news…

British author Colin Wilson passed away.

Wilson was perhaps best known to sf fans for The Space Vampires which was later adapted as the film Lifeforce, directed by Tobe Hooper. Wilson also wrote the books The Outsider (1956), The Mind Parasites (1967, a Cthulhu Mythos book), the Spider World series, The Philosopher’s Stone (1969), Science Fiction as Existentialism (1980) and more. Some of his short fiction was collected in The Essential Colin Wilson (1985).

Time to watch Lifeforce again...



Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 15, 2013, 02:51:09 PM
Peter O'Toole.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on December 15, 2013, 04:05:17 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-25393557
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 15, 2013, 07:01:44 PM
Peter O'Toole.

Fucking sad, man. Made me moody as soon as I heard.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on December 15, 2013, 07:12:36 PM
Was he your mate?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 15, 2013, 07:17:53 PM
He was!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on December 16, 2013, 07:47:19 AM
*Hugs*
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 16, 2013, 08:11:07 AM
Luckily, he left me as sole heir to his estate.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on December 16, 2013, 08:12:33 AM
Luckily, he left me as sole heir to his estate.

*Hugs*
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 16, 2013, 01:26:48 PM
Billy Jack died! (And Joan Fontaine is our trifecta):

Quote
The actor-filmmaker Tom Laughlin has died at the age of 82. Laughlin was best known as the titular Billy Jack, the iconic character he created and played in four movies made between 1967 and 1977. A half-Native American, a former Green Beret and Vietnam vet, and a master of hapkido, Billy Jack was a reluctant tough-guy hero who admired the pacifist principles of his friend Jean (played by Laughlin’s wife, Dolores Taylor) and the kids at her experimental “Freedom School,” but who was unable to control his fury when confronted with cruelty, intolerance, and official misconduct. At the height of his popularity, the character offered a counterculture alternative to the implicitly conservative, vigilante movie heroes of Death Wish and Dirty Harry. Billy Jack also provided a rough template for the TV series Kung Fu, whose half-Chinese hero (David Carradine) was forever expressing his deep regret at being forced to use his martial arts fighting skills to kick some bully’s ass through his hat.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 16, 2013, 01:27:28 PM
All on Sunday too!

*conspiracy theory*
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 16, 2013, 01:29:02 PM
Lifetime alcoholics are dying in their 80s! Is it the ultimate Obama Plan to kill us all? Or aliens?!?!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 16, 2013, 01:32:59 PM
LOLerskates...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on December 16, 2013, 02:32:30 PM
LOLerskates...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 16, 2014, 07:08:50 PM
The Professor from Gilligan's Island!

Whose left? Just Mary Anne, rigt?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on January 17, 2014, 03:39:49 AM
Au contraire, mon ami; Ginger is also still very much alive (not sure about kicking though).

Mr. Kincaid of The Partridge Family just kicked the bucket as well.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 17, 2014, 08:14:51 AM
Not just THE Ginger, but all of the Gingers are still alive. Man...that was a wiki hole...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 28, 2014, 08:15:20 AM
Pete Seeger.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 02, 2014, 02:45:59 PM
Philip Seymour Hoffman... Heroin overdose looks like...

EDIT:

From the NY Post:
Quote
Philip Seymour Hoffman found dead with needle in arm: cops
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 10, 2014, 10:12:16 AM
No one cares but me... But one of the more influential Classic Who directors died:

Quote
Christopher Barry, the legendary director of serials such as The Daleks, The Power of the Daleks and The Daemons, has sadly died at the age of 88.

Mr Barry will possibly be forever remembered as the director of that first Dalek serial in 1963 which paved the way for the ongoing success of the series and made cultural icons of Skaro’s finest. Yet the breadth of his work stretches from William Hartnell through to the Tom Baker era with The Creature From the Pit, not to mention Downtime in 1995. He is widely regarded as one of the classic series’ finest directors.

He will be sadly missed and our thoughts and condolences go out to his family at this sad time.

The legacy of Christopher Barry:

The Daleks (episodes 1,2,4,5 and 7)
The Rescue
The Romans
The Savages
The Power of the Daleks
The Dæmons
The Mutants
Robot
The Brain of Morbius
The Creature from the Pit
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 11, 2014, 10:21:45 AM
Shirley Temple Black. another one to file under "I thought she was already dead."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 11, 2014, 10:55:26 AM
Shirley Temple Black. another one to file under "I thought she was already dead."

No kidding... I could have sworn that she ate Pop Rocks and Diet Mountain Dew and died horribly in  in the back of an Apple store sometime in 1942.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 12, 2014, 04:44:11 PM
Woah...

Quote
The New York blog East Village Grieve is reporting the death of Maggie Estep, a poet, novelist, and spoken-word performance artist who rose to prominence in the 1990s, at a time when her hip, confrontational attitude fit right in with the burgeoning “alternative” scene. Estep died of a heart attack at the age of 50. The A.V. Club has reached out to her representatives for official confirmation; meanwhile, tributes from those who knew her continue to pour in on Twitter.

Like other spoken-word artists of the grunge era such as King Missile (and even Henry Rollins, if you like), Maggie Estep married her aggressive, sardonic verse to rock music, on albums such as 1994’s No More Mister Nice Girl. Tracks like “I’m Not A Normal Girl” and “The Stupid Jerk I’m Obsessed With” found Estep embracing her own neuroses and taking aim at boringly conventional idiots—two of the guiding philosophies of Generation X.

In an age where anything “counterculture” was readily snapped up, Estep’s angsty coffeehouse rants and Lower East Side cool made her a regular presence on MTV, which featured her on Spoken Word Unplugged (the kind of MTV show concept that now seems like a lifetime ago), and sent her out on the “Free Your Mind” tour with fellow slam poets John S. Hall (of King Missile) and Reg E. Gaines. Estep’s video for “Hey Baby” even turned up on Beavis And Butt-head, where she arguably broke through to her widest audience. Her MTV fame helped her land slots on the Lollapalooza and Woodstock festivals in 1994, and garnered her a glowing profile in the New York Times.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 12, 2014, 04:45:38 PM
And...


Quote
According to a report first passed along by Larry King, comic legend Sid Caesar has died at the age of 91. Caesar was an influential giant of television, whose weekly variety series Your Show Of Shows broke away from the broadly drawn goofs of vaudeville (though it still had its fair share of wacky characters) and presented sketches based on more recognizable situations with just a twist of absurdity. Its writing staff, including Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner, and Neil Simon, would more or less go on to mold American comedy. Caesar remained a TV fixture throughout nearly all of the 1950s, and was seen in movies like Grease and History Of The World: Part I.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 12, 2014, 06:21:18 PM
With Temple, there's the triad.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 24, 2014, 01:48:48 PM
Harold Ramis. Ugh.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chi-harold-ramis-dead-20140224,0,2259309.story (http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chi-harold-ramis-dead-20140224,0,2259309.story)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 24, 2014, 02:03:40 PM
Oh, man...and we just randomly re-watched Ghostbusters last night!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 24, 2014, 02:10:11 PM
There goes any remote hope of there being a Ghostbusters 3... which I'm pretty okay with.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 24, 2014, 02:13:34 PM
There goes any remote hope of there being a Ghostbusters 3... which I'm pretty okay with.

In fact, I might say that this death was the universe acting out in our favor...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on February 24, 2014, 02:25:09 PM
Nerd-Taoism.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 30, 2014, 04:53:31 PM
Oh man! The Rani died!

http://reflectionsonfilmandtelevision.blogspot.com/2014/03/tribute-kate-omara-1939-2014.html
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 06, 2014, 04:09:39 AM
Quote
Matthiessen died today, according to a statement released by his publisher: “Peter Matthiessen, award-winning author of more than thirty books, world-renowned naturalist, explorer, Buddhist teacher, and political activist, died at 5:15 PM on Saturday April 5, 2014 after an illness of some months.” Matthiessen was the author most notably of two National Book Award-winning volumes, the novel Shadow Country and in non-fiction The Snow Leopard.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 07, 2014, 10:34:25 AM
Didn't he die years ago?

Quote
TV, film and stage legend Mickey Rooney has passed away at 93, having been in poor health for "quite some time." In a career that spanned nine decades, beginning with his appearances as a toddler in his parents' vaudeville act, Rooney won a Juvenile Academy Award, an Emmy and multiple Golden Globes as well as critical acclaim for his work in Boys Town, Babes In Arms, National Velvet and Breakfast at Tiffany's, in addition to dozens of other films. Married eight times and father to nine children, Rooney appeared in his first filmed short Not To Be Trusted in 1926 at the age of six and was working on several projects at the time of his death.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 07, 2014, 11:21:59 AM
He was in those "Night at the Museum" movies.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on April 07, 2014, 03:42:18 PM
Bob Geldorf's vacuous daughter, "Peaches" was found dead in an, "unexplained and sudden" manner.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 18, 2014, 08:30:30 AM
Gabriel García Márquez

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/apr/17/gabriel-garcia-marquez-dies
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 30, 2014, 10:36:58 AM
Some hit harder than others...

Quote
British actor Bob Hoskins dies at 71
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 30, 2014, 11:52:35 AM
Wait...what? Oh god... That's upsetting.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 13, 2014, 08:22:49 AM
I've been rendered speechless. I'm also reaching that point in my life where 74 doesn't seem that old.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/05/13/us-people-giger-idUSKBN0DT0HX20140513 (http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/05/13/us-people-giger-idUSKBN0DT0HX20140513)

Quote
'Alien' artist H.R. Giger dies
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 13, 2014, 08:58:24 AM
I've been rendered speechless. I'm also reaching that point in my life where 74 doesn't seem that old.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/05/13/us-people-giger-idUSKBN0DT0HX20140513 (http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/05/13/us-people-giger-idUSKBN0DT0HX20140513)

Quote
'Alien' artist H.R. Giger dies

Just quite writing and looked up at the world and...yeah, this was the first bit of news. Man.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 14, 2014, 06:43:23 AM
Searching for Sugar Man was one of the best docs I saw last year...


http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/moviesnow/la-et-mn-searching-for-sugar-man-director-malik-bendjelloul-dies-20140513-story.html

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 15, 2014, 11:33:02 AM
Quote
SF Site is reporting that author Mary Stewart died on May 10.

SHe was best known for her Arthurian fantasies, such as The Crystal Cave and The Last Enchantment among others. She also wrote children’s books and her novel The Moon-Spinners was made into a film by Disney.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 28, 2014, 11:35:15 AM
Quote
Maya Angelou dead at 86

She's one that stayed relevant, I think, even in the last decade.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on June 02, 2014, 07:23:17 AM
Alice from the Brady Bunch.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on June 02, 2014, 10:53:44 AM
Alice from the Brady Bunch.

Ann B. Davis, of course.

She's one that stayed relevant, too.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on June 02, 2014, 01:40:53 PM
She's getting cozy with Sam The Butcher in TV heaven  8)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 09, 2014, 04:32:37 PM
http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-27770266 (http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-27770266)

Quote
Rik Mayall, star of The Young Ones, dies aged 56

British comedian and actor Rik Mayall has died aged 56.

He played the obnoxious, poetry-writing anarchist Rick in The Young Ones alongside his friend Adrian Edmondson. The duo later went on to star in the sitcom Bottom.

A pioneer of the 1980s alternative comedy scene, Mayall also appeared in Blackadder and The New Statesman.

His manager Roger Davidson said: "It is a terrible shock. All we know at this stage is that Rik died at home.

"He touched many lives, and always for the better."

Edmondson added: "There were times when Rik and I were writing together when we almost died laughing.

They were some of the most carefree stupid days I ever had, and I feel privileged to have shared them with him.

"And now he's died for real. Without me. Selfish bastard."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 09, 2014, 05:09:20 PM
Wow...that's surprising. And sad.

Guess I'm watching The Young Ones tonight!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 13, 2014, 11:57:04 PM
RC is yet to finish Twin Peaks with me...

Quote
Jazz singer “Little” Jimmy Scott has died. He was 88. Born James Victor Scott in Cleveland, Ohio, the singer was considered by some to be the “father of falsetto” soul and jazz. His distinct contralto voice was a side effect of Kallmann’s syndrome, a rare genetic condition that kept him from ever reaching puberty.

Scott released several albums in the ’50s and ’60s before fading into semi-obscurity. But his career was reinvigorated in 1991, when he sang at the funeral of Doc Pomus, a friend and fellow singer. Shortly thereafter, he was seen singing “Sycamore Trees” on the series finale of Twin Peaks; the song was also featured on the soundtrack of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me. Scott was asked to sing back-up on “Power And Glory,” a track on Lou Reed’s Magic And Loss in 1992, by which point he had already released his own record, All The Way, which received a Grammy nomination. He also sang “Why I Was Born” at Bill Clinton’s 1993 presidential inauguration—40 years after he sang the same cut at Dwight D. Eisenhower’s inauguration.

Scott continued to perform until shortly before his death. A new record, I Remember You, has been in the works since at least 2012.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 16, 2014, 09:17:11 AM
Exeuent Casy Kasem.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 16, 2014, 10:19:28 AM
Exeuent Casy Kasem.

Time to auction off my Negativeland EP!


Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 18, 2014, 10:03:53 AM
Quote
Daniel Keyes, the author of the high-school staple "Flowers for Algernon," died on Sunday, according to his publisher. He was 86. Keyes' short story "Flowers for Algernon," which he eventually turned into a novel, is narrated by a mentally disabled adult named Charlie Gordon. Charlie, who has an IQ of 68, undergoes an experimental procedure to increase his intelligence after the experiment is successfully performed on a mouse named Algernon. "If the operashun werks good Ill show that mouse I can be as smart as he is even smarter," Charlie says. "Then Ill be abel to reed better and spell the werds good and know lots of things and be like other pepul." Charlie's IQ shoots to 185, but when Algernon starts behaving strangely, Charlie knows that he, too, will begin to deteriorate. Keyes' publisher Tor wrote in a statement that "Flowers for Algernon was an key example of science fiction that tackled problems of depth and emotional consequence; Keyes made a giant contribution to the discussion of science fiction as a serious art form."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Sirharles on June 25, 2014, 11:38:34 AM
Eli Wallach....sad.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/25/movies/eli-wallach-multifaceted-actor-dies-at-98.html?_r=0
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 25, 2014, 11:42:46 AM
Another one I thought was already dead.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 25, 2014, 11:48:23 AM
Eli Wallach....sad.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/25/movies/eli-wallach-multifaceted-actor-dies-at-98.html?_r=0

That insane dizzy graveyard scene was the first thing that came to mind...

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 12, 2014, 03:06:19 PM
The last Ramone...


http://dangerousminds.net/comments/tommy_ramone_rip_last_original_member_of_ramones_passes
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on July 12, 2014, 07:04:52 PM
Oh wow...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 21, 2014, 11:49:53 AM
Happy Trails to Maverick.

Quote
James Garner, one of the most celebrated, acclaimed and beloved actors on the planet, passed away last night in Los Angeles.

He enjoyed an enviable film career that incorporated standout turns opposite Marlon Brando and Ricardo Montalban in “Sayonara” (1957), opposite Steve McQueen in “The Great Escape” (1963), opposite Julie Andrews in “The Americanization of Emily” (1964), opposite Toshiro Mifune and Yves Montand in “Grand Prix” (1966), and opposite Bruce Lee and Carroll O'Connor in "Marlowe" (1969). In his later years he garnered an Oscar nomination for “Murphy’s Romance” (1985).
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 21, 2014, 12:05:47 PM
I've meant to post that about six times, but always get side-tracked.

I had a little bit of a Garner-fest yesterday. TM grew up on Rockford!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 28, 2014, 04:39:27 PM
Quote
Peter Marquardt, who played the white-suited drug lord Moco in Robert Rodriguez's 1992 classic El Mariachi and its first sequel, has died, a funeral home in Austin confirmed Sunday. He was 50.
Marquardt died July 19, a spokeswoman at the Cook-Walden/Forest Oaks Funeral Home and Memorial Park said. No cause of death was immediately available.
In addition to showing up in flashback in Desperado (1995), the middle film in Rodriguez's stylishly violent "Mexico Trilogy," Marquardt appeared in the writer-director's 2003 film Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over (2003) and in the 2011 film The Shadow People.
Rodriguez famously launched his career in Hollywood when he made the Spanish-language El Mariachi for $7,200. He was signed by ICM, and Columbia Pictures snapped up the U.S. distribution rights to the film and signed him to a deal.
To cobble together the funds to make El Mariachi, Rodriguez checked himself into a research facility as a test subject for cholesterol-lowering medication. He made $3,000, and it was there that he met Marquardt, who was in the next bunk. Marquardt got the role of the gangster in the film despite the fact he didn't speak Spanish.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on July 31, 2014, 11:20:36 AM
Here's where I admit that I somehow thought Dick Smith was already dead. That said, the importance of his influence on the movies we love cannot be understated.

http://news.sky.com/story/1310857/godfather-of-makeup-dick-smith-dies-aged-92 (http://news.sky.com/story/1310857/godfather-of-makeup-dick-smith-dies-aged-92)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 06, 2014, 01:37:00 PM
Quote
Marilyn Burns, one of the original “scream queens” who starred in Tobe Hooper’s original 1974 “Texas Chainsaw Massacre,” died Tuesday in Texas. She was 65 and was found dead in her home near Houston.

“Texas Chainsaw” was her first lead role; in it she played teenager Sally Hardesty, who goes with her brother and friends to the cemetery where her grandfather is buried and ends up as the only survivor of an encounter with the insane family led by chainsaw-wielding Leatherface.

Burns was born in Erie, Penn., raised in Texas and had small parts in films including Robert Altman’s “Brewster McCloud” while she was still in high school, and George Roy Hill’s “The Great Waldo Pepper.”

But she was most known for horror films including Hooper’s 1977 “Eaten Alive,” about an insane hotel proprietor who feeds his guests to his pet alligator. Among her other films were “Kiss Daddy Goodbye” and “Future-Kill.”

In 1976, she appeared in TV movie “Helter Skelter” as Charles Manson follower Linda Kasabian. She had a cameo in “Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation” and was seen in her original role in archival footage in “Texas Chainsaw 3D.”

She talked to Terror Trap in 2004 about her experience shooting the gruesome “Chainsaw”: “Afterwards, I was just so grateful it was over. I probably was the happiest girl alive. During it, I was 100% focused and I probably wasn’t a joy to be around. It was an interesting shoot for sure.”
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 06, 2014, 08:43:07 PM
I brought up TCM in my paper presentation this AM and said "RIP Marilyn Burns."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 11, 2014, 09:01:02 PM
WHAT?!?!

Quote
Beloved actor Robin Williams was found dead on Monday, police reported.

He was 63.

The apparent cause of death was suicide by asphyxiation, authorities said. According to his publicist, Williams had been battling severe depression.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on August 12, 2014, 06:00:28 AM
Yes, very sad.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 12, 2014, 07:36:53 AM
Rounding up the news today, only one source so far mentions that the suicide followed open heart surgery (everyone else is weepily pulling the heart strings and asking why). So there was stuff going on.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 12, 2014, 11:37:01 AM
Cracked has a great piece on why funny people kill themselves.

It's the sad clown syndrome, man. If you don't laugh, you'll most certainly cry. Comedians find a way to make these horrible things funny and therefore bearable. And sometimes they just can't take the horror anymore.

I understand exactly why Robin Williams killed himself. So much so it's scary.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 12, 2014, 11:48:03 AM

I understand exactly why Robin Williams killed himself. So much so it's scary.

Complications from a double bypass and the grim knowledge of mortality that comes with it?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 12, 2014, 02:02:32 PM
Jesus... Guess I'd better get off FB today so I can avoid the fucking people spam-posting their weeping freakout about Robin Williams.

This started last night...when I complained about it to the TM, she said, "Why do people care? He's a corpse now! No good to anyone!"
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on August 12, 2014, 02:42:20 PM
Ha.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 12, 2014, 03:28:36 PM
I especially like the one FB friend who posted late last night: "Robin Williams, R.I.P. I have no words." Their 12th post in a row today about him was, "It feels as if the gods are weeping for him..."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on August 12, 2014, 03:36:03 PM
Retards. Just watch his films and shut your fucking mouth.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 12, 2014, 03:48:00 PM
Since I posted that, she's gotten up to 16 posts.  I should just reply every single time quoting her "I have no words" post.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on August 12, 2014, 04:01:33 PM
Haha. Yes. Please do.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 13, 2014, 08:10:51 AM
Number two:

Quote
Actress Lauren Bacall, the husky-voiced Hollywood icon known for her sultry sensuality, died Tuesday. She was 89.
Robbert de Klerk, co-managing partner of the Humphrey Bogart Estate, said Bacall died in New York.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 13, 2014, 08:19:21 AM
Oh, and #3 was a few days ago"

Quote
The film producer who first brought Captain America, Nuclear Man and Skeletor to the screen has died at 85.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, legendary B-movie entrepreneur Menahem Golan lost consciousness and died as he strolled outside his home in Jaffa, Israel, on Friday (Aug. 8). While considered a film pioneer in his native country, Golan was perhaps best known to film geeks around the world as one of the masterminds behind Cannon Films, the company he ran for a decade with his cousin and partner, Yoram Globus.

http://www.blastr.com/2014-8-8/genre-b-movie-king-menahem-golan-dies-85

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Disco Dust on August 19, 2014, 08:53:37 PM
An ode to one of his many memorable jokes about disco dust [the substance]...he used to say 'why is it called freebase? It should be called homebase!'
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 20, 2014, 07:20:29 AM
Wait...who died? Are you talking about Menahem Golan?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 25, 2014, 08:28:43 AM
Quote
LONDON –  Acclaimed actor and Oscar-winning director Richard Attenborough, whose film career on both sides of the camera spanned 60 years, has died. He was 90.

The actor's son, Michael Attenborough told the BBC that his father died Sunday. He had been in poor health for some time.

Prime Minister David Cameron issued a statement calling Attenborough "one of the greats of cinema."

"His acting in `Brighton Rock' was brilliant, his directing of `Gandhi' was stunning," Cameron said.

Ben Kingsley, who shot to global fame for his performance as Mahatma Gandhi, recalled Attenborough's passionate 20 year struggle to bring Gandhi's story to the big screen. The film won eight Oscars, including best picture, best director for Attenborough and best actor for Kingsley.

"He placed in me an absolute trust and in turn I placed an absolute trust in him and grew to love him," said Kingsley. "I along with millions of others whom he touched through his life and work will miss him dearly."

With his abundant snow-white hair and beard, Attenborough was one of the most familiar faces on the British arts scene -- universally known as "Dickie."

He appeared in a many major Hollywood films, directed a series of movies and was known for his extensive work as a goodwill ambassador for UNICEF and other humanitarian causes.

As a director, Attenborough made several successful movies, from "Oh What a Lovely War" in 1969 to "Chaplin" and "Shadowlands" in the 1990s.

The generation that was introduced to Attenborough as an avuncular veteran actor in the 1990s -- when he played the failed theme park developer in "Jurassic Park" and Kriss Kringle in a remake of "Miracle on 34th Street" -- may not have appreciated his dramatic range.

A small, energetic man with a round face that remained boyish even in old age, he was perfectly cast at the start of his career as the young sailor or airman of British movies during and after World War II.

In his 1942 film debut as a terrified warship's crewman in "In Which We Serve," a 19-year-old Attenborough made a small part into one of the most memorable roles in the movie, which won the Best Picture Oscar.

In 1947, Attenborough gave one of the best performances of his career as the teenage thug Pinkie in "Brighton Rock," the film version of Graham Greene's novel. Attenborough's baby face and air of menace combined to make it one of his most memorable roles.

His youthful appearance nearly cost him the lead role in the original cast of "The Mousetrap," because its author, Agatha Christie, didn't think he looked like a police detective. But he starred with his wife, actress Sheila Sim, when the hit play opened in November 1952 and stayed for 700 performances.

In 1959, Attenborough joined fellow actor Bryan Forbes in film production. "The Angry Silence" in 1960 was their successful debut, with Attenborough playing a strike-breaking factory worker. It was one of the first of the gritty, working-class films that heralded Britain's "new realism" of the 1960s.

Together, Forbes and Attenborough produced "Whistle Down the Wind" in 1961 and "The L-Shaped Room" in 1962. Their last film, 1964's "Seance on a Wet Afternoon," won Attenborough Best Actor awards from the London Film Critics and British Film Academy.

In the meantime, he had appeared as a prisoner of war in 1963's "The Great Escape" -- known for its classic ensemble cast, including Steve McQueen, James Coburn and Charles Bronson -- and starred in "Guns at Batasi," for which he won another British Film Academy award. In 1967, he won a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor in "The Sand Pebbles."

In 1969, Attenborough turned to directing with "Oh What a Lovely War," a lampoon of World War I, which won a Golden Globe award as best English-language foreign film. Three years later, he made "Young Winston," the story of Winston Churchill's early life.

In between, in 1971, he turned in a chilling performance as 1950s mass murderer John Reginald Christie in "10 Rillington Place."

By the mid-1970s, Attenborough had become a director who only occasionally acted. It was said that he took acting jobs to help finance the movies he wanted to direct.

But his return to directing in the 1977 war movie "A Bridge Too Far" was an expensive disaster, despite its cast of international stars. The following year, the heavy-handed 1978 thriller "Magic" was a failure despite the talents of Anthony Hopkins.

"A Chorus Line," Attenborough's 1985 film of the long-running stage musical, also took a critical beating. And, more recently, 1996's "In Love and War," failed to win much critical support.

Attenborough was often thought to be at his best when trying to coax the finest work from actors. "Gandhi" made a star of its little-known leading man, Kingsley, and Denzel Washington won an Oscar nomination for 1987's "Cry Freedom."

Debra Winger was nominated for an Oscar and Anthony Hopkins gave one of his best performances in "Shadowlands," a small, subtle film that won Attenborough perhaps his greatest critical praise.

Attenborough, son of a university principal, was born Aug. 29, 1923, into a family with strong liberal views and a tradition of volunteer work for humanitarian concerns.

One of his younger brothers is naturalist David Attenborough, whose nature documentaries have reached audiences around the world.

Richard Attenborough was a tireless defender of the British film industry. His artistic and humanitarian efforts were rewarded with several international prizes, including the Martin Luther King Jr. Peace Prize in 1983.He was knighted in 1976, and 17 years later received a life peerage, becoming Baron Attenborough of Richmond upon Thames.

His later years were marked by a personal tragedy when he lost his daughter Jane and granddaughter in the tsunami that hit Thailand the day after Christmas in 2004. The heart-broken Attenborough said he was never able to celebrate the Christmas holidays after that.

He had been in frail health since a fall at his house in 2008, and spent his last years in a nursing home with his wife.

He is survived by his wife, their son and a daughter.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 04, 2014, 05:54:13 PM
We were just talking about the awesomeness that is Joan Rivers, weren't we? I've long been a fan. She was a great comedian.

I'm going to raise a glass to Saint Joan tonight. In the meantime, some greatest hits:





Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 04, 2014, 10:25:00 PM
Everyone I know, except you, thinks she is a horrible monster and are celebrating her death.

(I agree with you, though.)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 04, 2014, 11:12:39 PM
That's because they've been brainwashed in to thinking being a good liberal means not having a sense of humor about horrible things in the world.

Laughing at terrible shit is a way to make it bearable. Rivers knew that and her humor reflected it.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 05, 2014, 08:40:36 AM
Amen.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 10, 2014, 10:11:46 AM
Graham Joyce: http://io9.com/weve-lost-one-of-the-great-fantasy-writers-r-i-p-grah-1632628519

He's one of those authors that I constantly hear about, and people say I have to read, but I've (so far) ignored for no particular reason. I just ordered SSome Kind of Fairy Tale: A Novel (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0385535783/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0385535783&linkCode=as2&tag=santafewriterspr&linkId=PKAULRK3MQH5VECX) today, tough...

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 11, 2014, 12:34:15 AM
Richard Kiel

http://www.cinemablend.com/new/James-Bond-Jaws-Richard-Kiel-Dead-74-67162.html (http://www.cinemablend.com/new/James-Bond-Jaws-Richard-Kiel-Dead-74-67162.html)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 28, 2014, 03:53:51 PM
Time for a music trifecta -- we start with:

Quote
Bruce, who died over the weekend in Suffolk at the age of 71, had a long career that extended well beyond his time with Cream—a group that only lasted for three years and four albums. But Cream was the culmination of what Bruce and a lot of his peers were doing in the UK while all the post-Beatles pop bands were dominating the charts. A group of obsessives, devoted to practiced musicianship and improvisation, fed off each other in underground clubs throughout the early 1960s. And then Clapton, Bruce, and Baker cranked up the volume and the velocity, creating a heavy blues-rock-jazz hybrid that was a progenitor of both heavy metal and prog-rock. The music press dubbed Cream a “power trio,” and the first “supergroup.” The band was an immediate sensation.

http://www.avclub.com/article/rip-creams-jack-bruce-bassist-extraordinaire-211022?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=feeds
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 12, 2014, 05:13:46 PM
Quote
Actor Warren Clarke has died at the age of 67. Clarke became an increasingly familiar face on British TV in the 1980s, and was probably best known in America as the lumbering, working-class police detective Andy Dalziel, a role he played from 1996 to 2007 in the popular crime series Dalziel And Pascoe. But moviegoers first noticed him when he played a character who started out on the other side of the law: Dim the droog, Malcolm McDowell’s heavyset, slow-witted sidekick in A Clockwork Orange (1971).

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 15, 2014, 03:29:07 PM
BSG, Magnum, and Knight Rider are the go to shows, but I somehow never realized he was also behind Quincy and the Six Million Dollar Man.

Quincy was great. It was the first "grown up show" I felt like I had an intellectual handle on, even though I was like six when it aired.

http://t.co/Lih8tf9f0m (http://t.co/Lih8tf9f0m)

Quote
Glen A. Larson, Creator of TV’s 'Quincy M.E.,' 'Magnum, P.I.' and 'Battlestar Galactica,' Dies at 77

The writer-producer also was behind 'Knight Rider,' 'Fall Guy' and 'Six Million Dollar Man'

Glen A. Larson, the wildly successful television writer-producer whose enviable track record includes Quincy M.E., Magnum, P.I., Battlestar Galactica, Knight Rider and The Fall Guy, has died. He was 77.

Larson, a singer in the 1950s clean-cut pop group The Four Preps who went on to compose many of the theme songs for his TV shows, died Friday night of esophageal cancer at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica, his son, James, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Larson also wrote and produced for such noteworthy series as ABC’s It Takes a Thief, starring his fellow Hollywood High School alum Robert Wagner as a burglar now stealing for the U.S. government, and NBC’s McCloud, with Dennis Weaver as a sheriff from Taos, N.M., who moves to Manhattan to help the big-city cops there.

Read more Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2014

After ABC spurned the original pilot for The Six Million Dollar Man (based on the 1972 novel Cyborg), Larson rewrote it, then penned a pair of 90-minute telefilms that convinced then-network executive Barry Diller to greenlight the action series, which starred Lee Majors as a former astronaut supercharged with bionic implants.

Other shows Larson created included Alias Smith & Jones, B.J. and The Bear, Switch (another series with Wagner), Manimal and The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo. He spent his early career at Universal Studios, inventing new shows and reworking others, before moving to 20th Century Fox in 1980 with a multiseries, multimillion-dollar deal.

With Lou Shaw, Larson conceived Quincy M.E., which starred Jack Klugman — coming off his stint on The Odd Couple — as a murder-solving Los Angeles medical examiner. A forerunner to such “forensic” dramas as CSI, the series ran for 148 episodes over eight seasons on NBC from 1976-83.

CBS’ Magnum, P.I., toplined by Tom Selleck as a charismatic Ferrari-driving private instigator based in Oahu, Hawaii, also aired eight seasons, running from 1980-88 with 162 installments. Larson created the ratings hit with Donald Bellisario, with whom he had worked on Quincy and Battlestar.

NBC’s Knight Rider, starring David Hasselhoff as a crime fighter aided by a Pontiac Trans-Am with artificial intelligence (K.I.T.T., drolly voiced by William Daniels), lasted four seasons and 90 episodes from 1982-86. And ABC’s Fall Guy, with Majors as a stuntman who moonlights as a bounty hunter, prevailed for five seasons and 113 episodes spanning 1981-86.

If you’re counting, Quincy, Magnum, Knight Rider and Fall Guy accounted for 513 hours of television and 21 combined seasons from 1976-88.

During a 2009 interview with the Archive of American Television, Larson was asked how he could possibly keep up with such a workload.

“I tried to stay with things until I thought they were on their feet and they learned to walk and talk,” he said.

“If you believe if something, you must will it through, because everything gets in the way. Everyone tries to steer the ship off course.”

Battlestar Galactica lasted just one season on ABC from 1978-79, yet the show had an astronomical impact. Starring Lorne Greene and Richard Hatch as leaders of a homeless fleet wandering through space, featuring special effects supervised by Star Wars’ John Dykstra and influenced by Larson’s Mormon beliefs, Battlestar premiered as a top 10 show and finished the year in the top 25. But it was axed after 24 episodes because, Larson said, each episode cost “well over” $1 million.

“I was vested emotionally in Battlestar, I really loved the thematic things. I don’t feel it really got its shot, and I can’t blame anyone else, I was at the center of that,” said Larson, who years early had written a sci-fi script, Adam’s Ark, with a theme similar to Battlestar’s and had been mentored by Star Trek's Gene Coon. “But circumstances weren’t in our favor to be able to make it cheaper or to insist we make two of three two-hour movies [instead of a weekly one-hour series] to get our sea legs.”

Much like Star Trek before it, Battlestar became much more beloved after it was canceled. Universal packaged episodes into two-hour telefilms and added a “Battle of Galactica” attraction to its studio tour that proved hugely popular. A new version debuted in 2004 on the Sci-Fi Channel, followed by a spinoff, Caprica.

Yet for all his success, Larson had his share of critics.

Writer Harlan Ellison, in a 1996 book about his Star Trek teleplay for the famous episode “City on the Edge of Forever,” infamously called him “Glen Larceny,” accusing him of using movie concepts for his TV shows.

It often has been noted that Battlestar premiered soon after Star Wars, that Alias Smith & Jones arrived shortly after Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid and that the setups for McCloud and B.J. and The Bear bore similarities to the Clint Eastwood films Coogan’s Bluff and Every Which Way But Loose, respectively.

“Larson is undeniably a controversial figure in TV history because of his reputation for producing video facsimiles of popular films, but scholars, fans and critics should also consider that ‘similarity’ is the name of the game in the fast world of TV productions,” John Kenneth Muir wrote in his 2005 book, An Analytical Guide to Television’s Battlestar Galactica. “Shows are frequently purchased, produced and promoted by networks not for their differences from popular productions, but because of their similarities.”

Fox in 1978 sued Battlestar studio Universal for infringing on Star Wars copyrights but lost the suit years later, vindicating Larson, who described his TV show as “Wagon Train heading toward Earth.”

He also said that Alias Smith & Jones was “certainly in the genre of Butch Cassidy, a New Wave western” and compared B.J. and the Bear to something along the lines of the 1977 film Smokey & the Bandit.

He was not apologizing for any of this.

“Television networks are a lot like automobile manufacturers, or anyone else who’s in commerce. If something out there catches on with the public … I guess you can call it ‘market research,’ ” he said in the TV Archive interview. “You can go in and pitch one idea at a network and they’ll say, ‘You know, we’d really like it if you had something a little more like this.’ ”

And the trend goes on: new versions of Battlestar, Knight Rider, Manimal, Six Million Dollar Man and The Fall Guy have been floated about for the big screen in recent years.

Glen Albert Larson was born an only child on Jan. 3, 1937, in Long Beach, Calif. He and his parents moved to Los Angeles when he was young, and he became enthralled with the art of storytelling while listening to hour after hour of radio shows.

He met Wagner while hitchhiking to Hollywood High and landed a job as a page at NBC, then home to such live anthologies as Lux Video Theatre and Matinee Theatre.

Music took over when Capitol Records A&R exec Nik Venet signed The Four Preps to a long-term contract in 1956, and the wholesome youngsters recorded such hits as “Twenty Six Miles (Santa Catalina),” “Big Man," “Dreamy Eyes” and "Down by the Station."

“Ultimately, The Four Preps’ biggest influence can be heard via their impact on Brian Wilson, whose harmony-driven production for The Beach Boys was a direct antecedent of The Four Preps’ sound,” or so says a biography of the group on AllMusic.com.

The Preps appeared on The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet, The Ed Sullivan Show and American Bandstand, played college campuses around the country and toured the world. But with a new wife and child, Larson wanted to get off the road, so he pursued a career in television and sold a story idea for a 1966 episode of The Fugitive.

Larson then wrote an episode of It Takes a Thief, and within the short span of a season he went from story editor to producing the series.

He created his first show, the ABC Western Alias Smith and Jones, which starred Peter Duel and Ben Murphy as outlaw cousins trying to go straight. He exited the series soon after Duel died of a self-inflicted gunshot on New Year’s Eve in 1971.

He did not get along with Klugman on Quincy and eventually left the show in the hands of Bellisario.

Selleck, who was under contract at Universal and had done a couple of pilots that had not made it to series, was obligated to do Magnum, whose pilot was written by Bellisario.

“We got the star, it was a perfect fit,” said Larson, who was a fan of the 1960s CBS series Hawaiian Eye, which centered on a detective agency. “I had a house over there [in Hawaii] and a guy [like Selleck’s character] who lived in a guest house and took care of it.”

Larson based the unseen novelist character Robin Masters, the owner of the home, on author Harold Robbins.

After years at Universal — where he also did The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries for ABC and Buck Rogers in the 25th Century for NBC — Larson left for Fox. But to get out of his Universal deal, he had to give the studio one more show, and that would be Knight Rider.

“Michael Knight [Hasselhoff’s character] in a way is a prototyped by the Lone Ranger,” Larson said. “If you think about him riding across the plains and going from one town to another to help law and order, then K.I.T.T. becomes Tonto.”

At Fox in the spring of 1983, he sold four new series: Manimal to ABC and Trauma Center, Automan and Masquerade to ABC, but all were quickly canceled.

Larson’s next show, CBS’ Cover Up — about a photographer (Jennifer O’Neill) who replaces her late husband as an undercover CIA agent — lasted one season. During production, actor Jon-Erik Hexum died as a result of an accidental self-inflicted blank-cartridge gunshot wound on the set.

In July 2011, Larson sued Universal, alleging a decades-long fraud perpetrated by a studio that he said never once sent him profit participation statements despite his shows earning hundreds of millions of dollars.

More recently, Larson reteamed up with The Four Preps, reuniting in 2004 for a PBS reunion show, Magic Moments, with best friends and fellow group members David Somerville and Bruce Belland.

Survivors include his wife Jeannie, brother Kenneth and nine children (including his son James) from former wives Carol Gourley and Janet Curtis: Kimberly, Christopher, Glen, Michelle, David, Caroline, Danielle and Nicole.

A memorial service will be held in the near future, his son said.

Despite his remarkable career churning out hits, Larson earned but three Emmy nominations, two for producing McCloud and one (for outstanding drama) for Quincy. He never won.

His shows, Larson said in the TV Archive interview, “were enjoyable, they had a pretty decent dose of humor. All struck a chord in the mainstream. What we weren’t going to do was win a shelf full of Emmys. We got plenty of nominations for things, but ours were not the kind of shows that were doing anything more than reaching a core audience. I would like to think we brought a lot of entertainment into the living room.”
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 15, 2014, 04:33:12 PM
Shit, RC, that ain't nothing. I have been reeling today because of:

Quote
R.A. Montgomery, author and publisher of the Choose Your Own Adventure children’s book series, has died at age 78 at his home in Vermont.

Raymond Almiran Montgomery graduated from Williams College and attended Yale Divinity School. After being dismissed from Yale for truancy, he began working on various ways to reach younger, learning-challenged students—first as an employee of the Wall Street Journal, and then as the founder of the Waitsfield Summer School in Waitsfield, Vermont. The experimental curriculum there included using games to teach basic math and reading, and this led to Montgomery’s development of role-playing games for the Edison Electric Company and the Peace Corps.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 15, 2014, 04:53:36 PM
Losing the creators of our childhood icons stings in a stranger place than losing the icons themselves. Not harder or softer, just different.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 16, 2014, 09:22:23 AM
Quote
Leigh Chapman, an actress who found her niche as a writer of action-adventure movies including Dirty Mary, Crazy Larry, has died after an eight-month battle with cancer. She was 75.

Chapman was born Rosa Lee Chapman in Kannapolis, N.C., in 1939, and moved out to Los Angeles in the early ’60s, where she got her first job as a secretary at the William Morris agency. That job eventually led to a series of TV gigs on shows like McHale’s Navy and The Monkees; her most famous TV role was as Napoleon Solo’s secretary Sarah on The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

But Chapman soon discovered that her true talent lay in writing, and in 1964 she penned her first TV script, an episode of the ABC detective series Burke’s Law. (Ironically, she had appeared on the show in a tiny part as “2nd Ad Lib Girl” the year before.) That led to gigs writing episodes of My Favorite Martian, Mission: Impossible, It Takes A Thief, and The Mod Squad, as well as five episodes of The Wild Wild West.

After an early gig writing the beach party movie A Swingin’ Summer in 1965, Chapman worked in TV until 1974, when she wrote the treatment for what became the 1974 Isaac Hayes blaxploitation film Truck Turner. She then wrote one of her most famous films, the 1974 Peter Fonda/Susan George car chase flick Dirty Mary, Crazy Larry. Chapman wrote screenplays in many genres, including comedies (How Come Nobody’s On Our Side?, 1975) and dramas (Boardwalk, 1979) but some of her biggest successes were in the action-adventure genre, including the 1979 Lee Majors movie Steel and the 1980 Chuck Norris ninja flick The Octagon.

Chapman’s last feature film credit was the 1990 female-cop drama Impulse, and her last TV gig was writing the pilot and one early episode of Walker, Texas Ranger, although she ended up removing her name from the credits due to a creative dispute. Throughout her career, Chapman was a rare female presence in the world of action movies, a world that continues to be male-dominated to this day. But it was very much her calling, as she described in a 2010 interview: “I couldn’t write a romantic comedy or a chick flick if my life depended on it,” she said. “I could write a love story, but it would have to be a Casablanca-type of love story, and some people would have to die.”
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 19, 2014, 11:37:01 AM
Quote
Ken Takakura, a veteran of over 200 films the AP calls one of the last great Japanese movie stars, has died at the age of 83. Takakura died on November 10, but the news was not announced in the Japanese media until after a private funeral service had been held. Takakura rose to fame playing tough-guy roles in yakuza films, before eventually becoming Hollywood’s go-to actor for Western movies made in Japan.

Takakura was born Goichi Oda in 1931 in Fukuoka, Japan, and joined the Toei film studio after graduating from Meiji University in 1955. The Japanese film industry operated under a studio system at that time, and at Toei Takakura labored on dozens of films, usually playing a stoic outcast who acts in defense of the poor and weak after being repeatedly provoked by the system. These roles endeared Takakura to the Japanese public, where a cult of personality Variety compares to Clint Eastwood grew up around the actor.

In 1965, Takakura starred in the breakout hit Abashiri Prison, which spawned a series of sequels Takakura would appear in for several years. But by the ’70s Takakura’s brand of honorable gangster had gone out of style, and he began to branch out into other kinds of roles. He reprised his famous yakuza persona for Sydney Pollack’s 1974 film The Yakuza, the first in a series of Western film roles, before leaving Toei in 1976.

Takakura continued to appear in hit Japanese and American films from the ’70s through the ’90s, including Yoji Yamada’s The Yellow Handkerchief (1977), Antarctica (1983)—the most popular Japanese movie of all time until it was displaced by Princess Mononoke in 1997—Railroad Man (1999), for which he won the Best Actor award at the Montreal World Film Festival, and as the manager forced to deal with Tom Selleck’s spoiled former major leaguer in Mr. Baseball (1992). But his most recognizable role for non-Japanese audiences was probably in Ridley Scott’s Black Rain (1989), where he played the Japanese cop caught between New York detectives Michael Douglas and Andy Garcia and a yakuza gang.

Takakura’s output slowed in the new millennium; his last film was 2012’s Dearest, where he played a retired prison guard who goes on a reflective journey to scatter his late wife’s ashes. Takakura received Japan’s highest cultural honor, the Order of Culture, in 2013, where he joked that he was surprised to receive an invitation to the Imperial Palace considering his onscreen reputation. “In movies, I’m most often an ex-convict. I’m grateful for the award despite many of these roles I’ve played,” Takakura said. “I really believe that hard work pays off.”
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 20, 2014, 10:27:00 AM
Mike Nichols... Here's to you, Mrs. Robinson.

http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/entertainment-icon-mike-nichols-died-age-83/story?id=27047342 (http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/entertainment-icon-mike-nichols-died-age-83/story?id=27047342)

Quote
Entertainment Icon Mike Nichols Has Died at Age 83

Mike Nichols, the entertainment icon and husband of ABC News Anchor Diane Sawyer, died suddenly Wednesday at the age of 83.

Nichols' death was announced in a statement by ABC News President James Goldston.

"He was a true visionary, winning the highest honors in the arts for his work as a director, writer, producer and comic and was one of a tiny few to win the EGOT-an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony in his lifetime," Goldston said in the statement.

"No one was more passionate about his craft than Mike."

Nichols was born in Germany in 1931, and came to the United States when he was 7 years old, when his family escaped Nazi Germany. He arrived in America speaking little English, but his enthusiasm for his new country never waned.

He graduated from the Walden School in New York City, and began pursuing theater while attending the University of Chicago in the early 1950s. While studying medicine, he found his true calling – comedy. He joined a comedy troupe in Chicago and teamed up with performer Elaine May. The duo gained national popularity together, cementing their partnership as America's innovative comedy duo.

But Nichols forged his legacy as a director, helming hits on Broadway and the silver screen – from "Barefoot in the Park" and "The Odd Couple" to "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" and "The Graduate." He earned the Oscar for best director for "The Graduate."

His unparalleled career, which stretched a half-century, included such successes as "Carnal Knowledge," "Working Girl," "The Birdcage" and "Closer." He earned his eighth Tony two years ago for his revival of "Death of a Salesman."

He had recently been working on a project for HBO to adapt "Master Class," Terrence McNally's Tony Award-winning play about opera legend Maria Callas. The project would have reunited him with frequent collaborator Meryl Streep.

Nichols is survived by his wife, children Daisy, Max and Jenny, and four grandchildren.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 20, 2014, 10:39:39 AM
I'm starting to dread whenever this thread gets updated...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 20, 2014, 01:34:36 PM
I'm with you.

I feel somewhat crass about it sometime too. Like I'm busy, but it's something I want to share with you guys. Yet not taking the proper time to reflect feels weird. I don't know. It's just the internet, right?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on November 23, 2014, 09:28:01 AM
Marion Barry. Wow, that one connects with me big time for some reason.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 23, 2014, 09:50:07 AM
So now DC politics can move forward!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 23, 2014, 10:54:17 AM
Oh, man. Yeah, that one feels personal.

So now DC politics can move forward!

Ba-Dum-CHIK!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 23, 2014, 02:01:35 PM
Oh, man. Yeah, that one feels personal.

So now DC politics can move forward!

Ba-Dum-CHIK!

Not joking... Berry, even in exile and shame, has dominated the voice, shape, and style of DC politics since before Home Rule.  DC politics has never been without Berry.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 23, 2014, 06:43:21 PM
I think his influence has waned in recent years.

EDIT:
Which isn't to say he wasn't lion in this town. He remained a populist force in DC until the day he died.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 23, 2014, 09:04:06 PM
Did you read the Post obit? It's a really great read.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/marion-barry-dies-4-term-dc-mayor-the-most-powerful-local-politician-of-his-generation/2014/11/23/331ad222-c5da-11df-94e1-c5afa35a9e59_story.html (http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/marion-barry-dies-4-term-dc-mayor-the-most-powerful-local-politician-of-his-generation/2014/11/23/331ad222-c5da-11df-94e1-c5afa35a9e59_story.html)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 24, 2014, 09:01:46 AM
His influence has not waned at all. He's basically selected all of his successors -- who get voted in at his say-so. He's dominated the city council for the last decade. He's been so entrenched -- by repeated unanimous (90+%) votes -- behind the scenes it's been sickening to watch.

How can we so easily forget the Cropp/Fenty debacle?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 24, 2014, 11:40:15 AM
I supposes there's a "Richard III" argument to be made there.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on November 24, 2014, 11:51:41 AM
Did you read the Post obit? It's a really great read.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/marion-barry-dies-4-term-dc-mayor-the-most-powerful-local-politician-of-his-generation/2014/11/23/331ad222-c5da-11df-94e1-c5afa35a9e59_story.html (http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/marion-barry-dies-4-term-dc-mayor-the-most-powerful-local-politician-of-his-generation/2014/11/23/331ad222-c5da-11df-94e1-c5afa35a9e59_story.html)

He lived a huge trainwreck of a life; pouring money out inappropriately and illegally on his constituents. It's just an amazing story.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 01, 2014, 05:04:00 AM
PD James...slipped through my vacation filter just now.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Nubbins on December 04, 2014, 09:44:09 AM
Two music greats this week, too...

Quote
Bobby Keys, the larger-than-life saxophone player who toured with the Rolling Stones for more than 45 years and played on studio classics like "Brown Sugar" and "Live With Me," has passed away. He was 70.

Quote
Faces and Small Faces keyboard player Ian McLagan dies aged 69
London-born musician also brought his Hammond and Wurlitzer sound to acts including Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan and Chuck Berry


Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 08, 2014, 01:57:26 PM
Quote
As reported by Gamasutra, pioneering inventor and influential video game designer Ralph Baer has died. He was 92.

Often dubbed “The Father Of Video Games,” Baer’s contributions to the game industry are tough to overstate. He invented the Brown Box, a prototype version of the Magnavox Odyssey, which would go on to become the world’s first commercially available home video game console when it was unveiled in 1972. The Odyssey and its Table Tennis game predate Pong—usually considered the first video game to break into mainstream popularity—by several months. Baer is even credited as having invented the light gun, the first video game peripheral, which was a forerunner of devices like the Wii Remote. Essentially, Baer’s work set the stage for the entire video game industry as we know it today.

http://www.avclub.com/article/rip-ralph-baer-inventor-first-home-video-game-cons-212706
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 09, 2014, 11:20:44 AM
Quote
Ken Weatherwax, the actor who played Pugsley in the 1960s TV version of The Addams Family, has reportedly died of a heart attack. TMZ picked up the story after his niece posted an announcement on Facebook. Weatherwax was 59.

So...if you go and read about his life, it's truly horrifying. All he did was Pugsley. He spent his whole life being Pugsley. (Please someone make "Being Pugsley"!)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 22, 2014, 02:35:29 PM
Joe Cocker.

Who's going to cover Beatles songs now?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 22, 2014, 02:40:35 PM
Joe Cocker.

Who's going to cover Beatles songs now?

Paul McCartney?

BOOM!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 23, 2014, 01:11:37 PM
LOL.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 23, 2014, 02:19:43 PM
Nine o'clock show is different from the seven o'clock show, folks.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 24, 2014, 05:29:09 PM
Ravi Shankar who I have to admit I already thought was dead. Still, I don't think it's a understatement to say that on a certain level he influenced the shape of modern pop music.

http://www.biography.com/news/ravi-shankar-world-music-icon-dead-at-92-21063647 (http://www.biography.com/news/ravi-shankar-world-music-icon-dead-at-92-21063647)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 02, 2015, 10:49:57 AM
Edward Hermann and Mario Cuomo in the past 24 hours.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 02, 2015, 12:05:56 PM
Those New Years Eve tequila slammers are deadly!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 04, 2015, 09:29:30 AM
Edward Hermann and Mario Cuomo in the past 24 hours.

Also on the second -- Donna Douglas. Ellie May!


Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 09, 2015, 10:13:43 AM
Even though he's in the "I thought he was dead" category, this still makes me sad:

Quote
Rod Taylor, who starred in The Time Machine (1960) and The Birds (1963), died January 7 at the age of 84.

Such an iconic actor for me...and I grew up with The Time Machine (and wax nostalgic about it in the memoir).
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 11, 2015, 10:04:59 AM
Quote
Robert Stone, the National Book Award-winning author whose globe-spanning, often socially charged novels delved into his characters’ despair with bleak humor, has died at age 77.

Worked with him a few years ago...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 11, 2015, 12:32:59 PM
http://deadline.com/2015/01/taylor-negron-dead-57-after-long-battle-with-cancer-1201346798/ (http://deadline.com/2015/01/taylor-negron-dead-57-after-long-battle-with-cancer-1201346798/)

Quote
Taylor Negron, Comedian & Actor, Dead At 57 After Long Battle With Cancer

He was also renowned for playing Mr. Pizza Guy in Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Rodney Dangerfield’s son-in-law in Easy Money.  Negron told KCET, “I became the alternative everyman in movies.”

He played the villain Milo in 1991’s The Last Boy Scout. Said Negron on the role in the same KCET interview, “It wasn’t a stretch, but it came as a surprise to me, because Bruce Willis, Tony Scott and Joel Silver had this idea in their head. So when they offered me the part, I thought it was a joke and they had made a mistake in the printing — that I was going to play the first goombah to the left. I realized very early on that Joel and dear, dear Tony Scott really cared about appearances, so with great detail they blonded my hair and gave me that asymmetrical ’60’s cut. It was like Hitler, only softer. I wore Dolce & Gabbana clothing and I looked so strange and otherworldly, and just by the sheer virtue of the fact that I had a gun in my hand, that did all the acting for me.”

It was hard not to spot Negron in any film as his credits were numerous in a melange of cult pics such as Punchline, One Crazy Summer, Angels in the Outfield, Nothing But Trouble, Stuart Little and The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas. He even reprised his role as the peeved Pizza Guy in Amy Heckerling’s 2012 film Vamps.

In TV, Negron started off with appearances as himself on 1970’s The Dating Game, and made a reputation as a hysterical guest star on 2001’s Hollywood Squares. On TV he also guest-starred frequently, playing both comedy and gravitas on a slew of hit series including Hill Street Blues, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, The Ben Stiller Show, Seinfeld, ER, Hope and Gloria, Party of Five, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Zoey 101 and The Wizards of Waverly Place.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 16, 2015, 03:42:27 PM
Quote
Kim Fowley, Runaways Producer and L.A. Rock Icon, Dead at 75

The producer and songwriter, whose credits include Kiss and Alice Cooper albums, was battling cancer at the time of his death

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/kim-fowley-runaways-dead-at-75-20150115 (http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/kim-fowley-runaways-dead-at-75-20150115)

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 16, 2015, 03:58:30 PM
Right. That's enough with this cancer thing.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 29, 2015, 05:08:06 PM
She's been really sick for a while now:

Quote
Colleen McCullough, author of 'The Thorn Birds,' dies at 77

Her Masters of Rome series is unparalleled, in my opinion. And everything else she's written is just remarkable.

She lived on Norfolk Island -- which is still mainly populated by descendants of the HMS Bounty survivors. Sadly, she  suffered from macular degeneration from 2005 or so onwards...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 14, 2015, 05:30:08 PM
Space Ghost died.

Quote
Variety has reported that actor/radio announcer/cartoon voice Gary Owens has passed.  He died on Feb. 12 at his home in Encino, California. He was 80, and had been a diabetic since the age of 8.

Best known for being the announcer on NBC’s Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In (1968-73), and for popularizing the  phrase “Beautiful downtown Burbank,” Owens lent his voice to more than 3,000 cartoons, providing the voice of Space Ghost, The Blue Falcon, Roger Ramjet, and Powdered Toast Man (on The Ren & Stimpy Show) among many others. His numerous supporting roles included parts on Garfield and Friends, The Fantastic Four, and Bobby’s World.

http://blogs.indiewire.com/animationscoop/the-voice-of-space-ghost-roger-ramjet-and-powdered-toast-man-has-passed-gary-owens-1936-2015-20150213
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 27, 2015, 01:27:10 PM
FB and the like is blowing up with reports that Leonard Nimoy has died.

Losing Doohan and Kelly was of course sad. but Nimoy and Shatner have always had this strange immortality. Since we're all acting like Into Darkness didn't happen anyway, I'm going to accept teh '09 reboot as Sock's swan song.

I'm going to go cry a bit.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 27, 2015, 01:52:13 PM
Yes...just saw this... Fucked me up a bit. I had a bit of a cry, as well.

Another hour of tedious work and then I think I have to go find a corner at a pub...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on February 27, 2015, 05:09:09 PM
FB and the like is blowing up with reports that Leonard Nimoy has died.

Losing Doohan and Kelly was of course sad. but Nimoy and Shatner have always had this strange immortality. Since we're all acting like Into Darkness didn't happen anyway, I'm going to accept teh '09 reboot as Sock's swan song.

I'm going to go cry a bit.

Damn.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on March 05, 2015, 12:57:12 PM
Just brought myself to read the posts RC and Nacho did on Nimoy.

Great job, guys.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 06, 2015, 09:52:17 AM
Thanks. It was cathartic to write.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 06, 2015, 10:00:47 AM
Quote
Harve Bennett, who produced four Star Trek movies and numerous science fiction TV series, died March 5 at the age of 84.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 06, 2015, 02:46:05 PM
Albert Maysles. He co-directed Grey Gardens, one of my favorite documentaries ever.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on March 06, 2015, 03:12:29 PM
Unneeded
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on March 06, 2015, 03:13:04 PM
Why does our forum still not support https for youtube links!?!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 08, 2015, 10:43:03 PM
Why does our forum still not support https for youtube links!?!

I have no idea. That's a bit of a mystery...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 12, 2015, 01:16:31 PM
Reports of Terry Pratchett's death are making the social media rounds.

Dear God, this is what middle age is going to be, isn't it? Just watching all the icons of our youth disappear.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 12, 2015, 01:28:37 PM
Reports of Terry Pratchett's death are making the social media rounds.

Dear God, this is what middle age is going to be, isn't it? Just watching all the icons of our youth disappear.

Well, he's been prepping us for years... The only real question here is if he got his wish for an assisted suicide or not.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on March 12, 2015, 05:13:11 PM
Dear God, this is what middle age is going to be, isn't it? Just watching all the icons of our youth disappear.

I think so. And watching our parents fade. Time to find some young icons to lift our spirits. Who won't die on us.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 12, 2015, 05:25:32 PM
Dear God, this is what middle age is going to be, isn't it? Just watching all the icons of our youth disappear.

I think so. And watching our parents fade. Time to find some young icons to lift our spirits. Who won't die on us.

JLaw!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 07, 2015, 10:39:32 AM
Rosco P. Coltrane finally gets them Duke Boys.... I assumed he was already dead.

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/entertainment/tv/media-scene-blog/article17597600.html (http://www.charlotteobserver.com/entertainment/tv/media-scene-blog/article17597600.html)

Quote
James Best, sheriff of ‘Hazzard,’ dies in Hickory at 88
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 14, 2015, 01:27:52 PM
Quote
Percy Sledge, who sang 'When A Man Loves a Woman,' dies
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 04, 2015, 09:44:10 AM
RIP Yeoman Rand...

http://www.startrek.com/article/remembering-grace-lee-whitney-1930-2015 (http://www.startrek.com/article/remembering-grace-lee-whitney-1930-2015)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 04, 2015, 10:42:15 AM
Now I have to go home and watch her get slapped around in TOS episodes!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 15, 2015, 08:06:49 AM
B.B. King.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 27, 2015, 10:19:52 AM
Tanith Lee

Quote
We are saddened to report the passing of science fiction, fantasy, and horror writer Tanith Lee. Lee had a long and prolific writing career, publishing over 90 books and 300 short stories, as well as several poems, four BBC Radio plays, and two episodes of the BBC’s sci-fi television series Blake’s 7.


Born in 1947 to two professional dancers, Lee grew up with a love of weird fiction, sci-fi, and Shakespeare. Struggling with then-undiagnosed dyslexia, Lee was unable to read until the age of 8, when her father taught her. Thereafter, she made up for lost time, publishing her first vignette at the age of 21. She worked various jobs as file clerk and assistant librarian as she sent out her work. Her first published novels were children’s fantasies The Dragon Hoard and Animal Castle, published by Macmillan in 1971 and 1972.

In 1975, DAW published Lee’s first adult fantasy The Birthgrave; DAW would go on to publish more than 20 of her other SFF and horror works in the 1970s and ’80s.

Lee received the British Fantasy Society’s August Derleth Award in 1980 for her book Death’s Master, as well as the World Fantasy Awards for Best Short Story in 1983 and 1984. She was also the recipient of Lifetime Achievement Awards from both the World Fantasy Convention in 2013 and the Horror Writers Association (HWA) in 2015.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 01, 2015, 11:04:53 AM
Quote
As confirmed by various outlets, character actress Betsy Palmer has died. She was 88.

Palmer was best known to modern audiences as Pamela Voorhees, the mother of the immortal, mask-wearing killer Jason Voorhees from the Friday The 13th films—though fans of the series will note that Pamela herself is the killer in the first movie, as she’s taking revenge on the careless teenagers who foolishly tried to reopen Camp Crystal Lake after another group of careless teenagers allowed her son to die there years earlier.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on June 01, 2015, 11:43:11 AM
Just came here to post this!

Quote
As confirmed by various outlets, character actress Betsy Palmer has died. She was 88.

Palmer was best known to modern audiences as Pamela Voorhees, the mother of the immortal, mask-wearing killer Jason Voorhees from the Friday The 13th films—though fans of the series will note that Pamela herself is the killer in the first movie, as she’s taking revenge on the careless teenagers who foolishly tried to reopen Camp Crystal Lake after another group of careless teenagers allowed her son to die there years earlier.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 01, 2015, 03:12:37 PM
I saw that yesterday. 88 is a god run though, eh?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 08, 2015, 05:37:32 PM
Well this is sad. The Goonies mom died.

http://variety.com/2015/film/news/actress-mary-ellen-trainor-zemeckis-ex-wife-of-robert-zemeckis-dies-at-62-1201514737/ (http://variety.com/2015/film/news/actress-mary-ellen-trainor-zemeckis-ex-wife-of-robert-zemeckis-dies-at-62-1201514737/)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 08, 2015, 07:01:23 PM
Goonies never die!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 09, 2015, 10:13:25 AM
Manson has said for years he just wants to outlive Bugliosi. Looks like he got his wish.

Quote
Charles Manson Prosecutor And 'Helter Skelter' Author Vincent Bugliosi Dead At 80

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/09/vincent-bugliosi-dead_n_7540864.html (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/09/vincent-bugliosi-dead_n_7540864.html)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 09, 2015, 10:15:06 AM
Man...this is gonna be the year of Manson.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 09, 2015, 10:19:06 AM
I'm hoping....
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 09, 2015, 10:20:56 AM
Well, it already is. There's a high profile TV show, and he's been in the news at least once every 14 days. This is actually the right moment for him to die. If he does that the snowball will go right over the lip of the mountain and start rolling down towards that innocent alpine village far below...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 09, 2015, 10:52:05 AM
So...Mary Ellen Trainor's death really got me thinking about Goonies!

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 09, 2015, 02:29:04 PM
Well, it already is. There's a high profile TV show, and he's been in the news at least once every 14 days. This is actually the right moment for him to die. If he does that the snowball will go right over the lip of the mountain and start rolling down towards that innocent alpine village far below...

I'll add to this...since McKinney, TX burst through my blackout wall. It'll be the year of Manson when we actually do have a race war in the US.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: monkey! on June 11, 2015, 08:47:50 AM
Christopher Lee.

No!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 11, 2015, 09:21:00 AM
Oh my god. Wish I hadn't of clicked on this thread...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 13, 2015, 02:06:37 PM
The past couple days have been brutal.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 25, 2015, 06:16:44 PM
Patrick macnee. Though I thought he was already dead, this is still a blow.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 07, 2015, 10:47:07 AM
Weintraub:


Quote
Jerry Weintraub, a Hollywood legend who worked with everyone from Led Zeppelin to George Clooney over the course of his storied career, has died. A colorful personality, Weintraub was reportedly in poor health in recent years; Deadline cites a heart attack as his cause of death. He was 77.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 09, 2015, 11:48:24 AM
Oh, character actor Irwin Keyes died today.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 12, 2015, 11:59:59 AM
Omar Sharif. Who I thought had died in the 70s.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 22, 2015, 10:21:09 AM
Quote
E.L. Doctorow died today of complications from lung cancer. He was 84 years old.

A tireless experimenter, Doctorow was most famous for the novels Ragtime, Billy Bathgate, and The March. Known as “Edgar” to those close to him, Doctorow’s awards included the National Book Award, three National Book Critics Circle Awards, two PEN Faulkner Awards, the Edith Wharton Citation for Fiction, and the presidentially conferred National Humanities Medal.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 01, 2015, 09:20:39 AM
Roddy Piper

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/08/01/sports/roddy-piper-one-of-the-most-hated-villains-in-professional-wrestling-dies-at-61.html?referrer=&_r=0

Quote
Rowdy Roddy Piper, a professional wrestler whose athleticism and antics in the ring helped raise the profile of World Wrestling Entertainment in the 1980s, has died, his agent said on Friday.

Mr. Piper was 61. The cause of death was not immediately available.

“Rod passed peacefully in his sleep last night,” his agent, Jay Schachter, said in a statement. “I am shocked and beyond devastated. He was an icon, a legend, an amazing man and a true friend.”

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 01, 2015, 09:21:23 AM
http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/07/31/428152089/alan-cheuse-novelist-and-longtime-npr-contributor-dies-at-75

Quote
Alan Cheuse, the novelist, teacher and longtime literary commentator for NPR, has died at the age of 75. His daughter, Sonya, confirmed that he died Friday of injuries sustained in a car accident in California two weeks ago.

"On behalf of the family, we are in deep grief at the loss of our beloved father, husband and grandfather," Sonya Cheuse told NPR. "He was the brightest light in our family. He will always remain in our hearts. We thank everyone for the outpouring of love and support."

Cheuse spent more than 25 years with NPR, contributing book reviews, profiles and commentary to All Things Considered, and lending his voice to online pieces, as well. During that time, he penned five novels of his own — the most recent of which, Prayers for the Living, was published this year.

As poet Robert Pinsky notes, Cheuse became a trusted voice for his peers much earlier than his work began with NPR in the 1980s. Pinsky met Cheuse when they were still in their teens, and the two studied together at Rutgers University, where Cheuse received his Ph.D. in 1974. He says that even while Cheuse was a student, tenured faculty would come to him for recommendations.

"He was the first, he was the first really impressive young writer I saw. We lived in a period when many great writers were alive. Alan was for me and many other people a guide to a very exciting world," Pinsky says.

"Alan embodied the spirit of ambitious, far-ranging writing that characterized modernist writing at the time," he adds.

It's a sentiment echoed by others, too.

Mitchell Kaplan, the co-founder of Miami Book Fair International, says that Cheuse took him under his wing when Kaplan was a young bookseller.

"He became a friend and a mentor, and someone I admired so greatly. So willing to promote other writers. So involved and appreciative of the work that anyone was doing," Kaplan says. "He always took so much pride in what others were doing."

It's a pride he expressed in teaching, as well. At the time of his death, Cheuse taught creative writing at George Mason University in Virginia, and for years, he led fiction workshops at the Squaw Valley Community of Writers in California.

While Cheuse was in the hospital, his students at GMU showed their appreciation of his teaching by opening the Alan Cheuse Literary Review, asking for submissions from all the GMU students and faculty "whose writing has been brightened by Alan's sharp wit and wisdom to contribute to a special project."

Within hours, they had received so many requests from writers and teachers outside the school that they had to expand their submission guidelines.

Sonya Cheuse, director of publicity for the publisher Ecco, says her father passed his love of literature down to her and to the rest of his family.

"My dad is the reason I love reading," she says. "This is the family business."

Cheuse is survived by his wife, Kris O'Shee; daughters Sonya and Emma; and son, Josh.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 19, 2015, 11:00:59 AM
I guess I didn't know she was Kirk's green alien lady too.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/yvonne-craig-dead-batgirl-1960s-816226
 (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/yvonne-craig-dead-batgirl-1960s-816226)

Quote
Yvonne Craig, TV's Sexy Batgirl of the 1960s, Dies at 78

She joined ABC’s 'Batman' for its third and final season after appearing in a pair of films starring Elvis Presley, whom she dated.

Yvonne Craig, the sexy actress who originated the role as the high-kicking crime fighter Batgirl on the iconic 1960s ABC series Batman, has died. She was 78.

A former ballerina, Craig died Monday night at her home in Pacific Palisades, her nephew, Christopher Carson, announced. The cause was breast cancer that had metastasized to her liver, he said.
 
Craig also was known for playing Marta, an insane green Orion Slave Girl who wanted to kill Captain Kirk (William Shatner), in a 1969, third-season Star Trek episode, “Whom Gods Destroy.”

Craig joined Batman for its third season and final season (1967-68) as Batgirl/librarian Barbara Gordon, the daughter of Gotham City Police Commissioner Gordon (Neil Hamilton).
 
Batman producer William Dozier, for whom she had done an unsold sitcom pilot years earlier, called and asked her if she would come in for an interview, she once recalled.
 
“When I got there, he said, ‘We’re thinking of adding a new character to the Batman series — Batgirl. Would you be interested in doing it?' I said, ‘Very!’ ”
 
Craig said they put her character on the show “because they needed someone who could encourage an over-40 male audience and a prepubescent female audience. That’s the real reason why they hired me!"
 
Craig did all of her own stunts and all of her motorcycle riding on the show. Her leatherette-clad character accessed her sleek Batgirl Cycle from an old, unused elevator that was hidden behind a revolving wall in her apartment and led to the street below.
 
On the series, only the Wayne butler Alfred (Alan Napier) knew her secret identity  — not even Batman (Adam West) or Robin (Burt Ward)!
 
Batman was an immediate sensation when it debuted in January 1966 but ran out of steam by the time Craig joined the series for its final 26 episodes.
 
The dark-haired beauty, a native of Taylorville, Ill., began her theatrical career at age 17 as the youngest member of The Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. She traveled the U.S. and was with the troupe for three years when she was discovered by director John Ford’s son Patrick and cast for the lead in the movie The Young Land (1959).
 
She then starred opposite Elvis Presley in the films It Happened at the World’s Fair (1963) and Kissin’ Cousins (1964). The two dated for a spell.
 
Her film résumé also included The Gene Krupa Story (1959), John Sturges’ By Love Possessed (1961), 7 Women From Hell (1961) — with future Joker villain Cesar Romero — Ski Party (1965) and Mars Needs Women (1967).
 
On television, she appeared on The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., Fantasy Island, The Six Million Dollar Man, Kojak, Land of the Giants, Mod Squad, The Wild Wild West, Emergency! and many other shows.
 
Most recently, she provided the voice of Grandma in the 2009 cartoon series Olivia for Nickelodeon, served as executive producer for the documentary feature BIRTH and worked as a real estate broker.
 
Yvonne and her sister, Meridel, went into the prepaid phone card business at its inception, producing phone cards as fundraisers for many charitable organizations as well as promotional phone cards for the 1995 Paramount film Clueless — starring Alicia Silverstone, who played Batgirl in 1997's Batman & Robin. They also did Daffy Duck and Bugs Bunny cards for Warner Bros. stores, her nephew noted.
 
In 2000, she wrote a memoir, From Ballet to the Batcave and Beyond.
 
In addition to her sister and nephew, survivors include her husband, Kenneth, and another nephew, Todd.
 
In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to The Angeles Clinic Foundation.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 19, 2015, 07:19:11 PM
Yeah. I love the love she's getting today...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 30, 2015, 10:53:11 PM
So *this* is 40, I guess.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/wes-craven-horror-maestro-dies-818806 (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/wes-craven-horror-maestro-dies-818806)

Quote
Wes Craven, Horror Maestro, Dies at 76

He directed 'Scream' and the 'Nightmare on Elm Street' films.

Wes Craven, the famed writer-director of horror films known for the Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream movies, died Sunday after a battle with brain cancer. He was 76.

Craven, whose iconic Freddy Krueger character horrified viewers for years, died at his home in Los Angeles, his family announced.

Craven claimed to have gotten the idea for Elm Street when living next to a cemetery on a street of that name when growing up in the suburbs of Cleveland. His five Nightmare on Elm Street films were released from 1984-89.

Similarly, Craven's Scream series was a box-office sensation. In those scare-'em-ups, he spoofed the teen horror genre. The movies frequently referenced other horror movies.

Craven’s first feature film was The Last House of the Left, which he wrote, directed and edited in 1972.

Here invented the youth horror genre again in 1984 with the classic A Nightmare on Elm Street, which he wrote and directed.
 
He conceived and co-wrote Elm Street III as well, and then after not being involved with the three more sequels, deconstructed the genre a decade after the original, writing and directing Wes Craven’s New Nightmare, which was nominated as best feature at the 1995 Spirit Awards. His own Nightmare players, Robert Englund, Heather Langenkamp and John Saxon, played themselves in the film.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 31, 2015, 10:03:03 AM
That's more like 76!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 24, 2015, 09:10:35 AM
The didn't know he was still alive club:

Quote
Yankees Hall Of Fame catcher Yogi Berra died Tuesday in West Caldwell, New Jersey, according to The New York Times. He was 90, and made his first appearance in a Major League baseball game exactly 69 years ago yesterday.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 29, 2015, 08:38:39 AM
Wow...what? Jesus. This is sad. We simply can't have a reboot without the Log Lady. She was the narrative thread for the whole show!

Quote
Catherine E. Coulson, who played the Log Lady on David Lynch’s “Twin Peaks” TV series and was set to return to the new Showtime version, died Monday morning of cancer. She was 71.

“We are all deeply sad, she meant so much to so many,” said her agent, Mary Dangerfield, who confirmed her death.

Coulson, who also worked as a camera assistant, reprised the Log Lady role in the feature “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me” and more recently, she appeared on an episode of “Portlandia” and in the film “Redwood Highway.”

Lynch said in a statement, “Today I lost one of my dearest friends, Catherine Coulson. Catherine was solid gold. She was always there for her friends — she was filled with love for all people — for her family — for her work.  She was a tireless worker. She had a great sense of humor — she loved to laugh and make people laugh. She was a spiritual person — a longtime TM meditator. She was the Log Lady.”

Coulson worked with Lynch as assistant director on his 1977 debut feature “Eraserhead,” where they began discussing the idea of a woman who carried around a log. She described her Margaret Lanterman character as the “only normal person on the show,” but qualified that she’s “had some trauma and bonded with this Ponderosa pine.” The ABC show ran for two seasons in 1990 and 1991.

She also appeared in Lynch’s 1974 short film “The Amputee” as a woman with both legs amputated.

When she appeared at a Philadelphia event last December, she was asked if Lynch had any suggestions for her character in the new “Twin Peaks. “He suggested I talk about sustainable forestry,” she told the Wall St. Journal at the time.

Coulson worked as first or second assistant camera on “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” “Modern Romance,” “Youngblood” and “Night on Earth.”

After moving back to her birthplace of Ashland, Ore., she appeared in numerous plays for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, including “August, Osage County,” “Much Ado About Nothing,” “Hamlet” and “Chicago.” Elsewhere she appeared in “Major Barbara,” “The Elephant Man” and “The Threepenny Opera.”

Coulson was married to “Eraserhead” and “Twin Peaks” star Jack Nance before marrying Marc Sirinsky, with whom she had a daughter.


Of course, that scene leads to...

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 04, 2015, 10:04:23 AM
Am I sad? Yes. Am I surprised. Unfortunately, no. Don't do hard drugs, kids.

Quote
Former Stone Temple Pilots Singer Scott Weiland Dead At 48
The musician was found dead on his tour bus.

Former Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland died on Thursday. Cause of death was not released. He was 48.

According to TMZ, the musician was found dead on his tour bus ahead of the show his most recent band, Scott Weiland & the Wildabouts, was scheduled to perform at the Medina Entertainment Center in Minnesota.

The singer rose to fame as the frontman of the Grammy Award-winning Stone Temple Pilots, whose hits include "Interstate Love Song," ''Plush," and "Vasoline."

When the band broke up in 2003, Weiland went on to front Velvet Revolver, the supergroup that featured former members of Guns N' Roses, including guitarist Slash and bassist Duff McKagan, The Associated Press reported. STP reunited in 2008 and split again five years later.

Weiland struggled with substance abuse issues for years, and had a long string of drug- and alcohol-related arrests and stints in rehab. His addiction contributed to STP's 2003 breakup.

In March, Wildabouts guitarist Jeremy Brown died at 34 as a result of multiple drug intoxication, according to the coroner's report.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 08, 2015, 10:57:34 AM
Quote
Martin E. Brooks, Actor on 'The Six Million Dollar Man,' Dies at 90

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/martin-e-brooks-dead-six-846578 (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/martin-e-brooks-dead-six-846578)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 10, 2015, 11:49:17 AM
Time for an AYBS marathon!

Quote
Actor Nicholas Smith, the last surviving member of the cast of the BBC sitcom Are You Being Served?, died December 7. He was 81.

Before gaining fame in the long-running comedy about the employees of a fictitious department store, Smith was a working actor with many small character roles.

His career began in children’s TV series.

His first role was an uncredited bit part in Pathfinders to Mars (1960), one of several sequels to British TV’s Target Luna, whose producer Sydney Newman went on to co-create Doctor Who.

And in the second season of Doctor Who (1964), Smith appeared in The Dalek Invasion of Earth as Wells, co-leader of a rebellion of human slaves against the Daleks.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 28, 2015, 07:14:16 PM
Meadowlark Lemon. Kind and f sad about that...the Globetrotters were a big deal for me as a kid.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on December 29, 2015, 12:08:57 PM
They were just in Baltimore last weekend.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 02, 2016, 10:20:23 AM
Man, this family has bad genes:

Quote
Natalie Cole, a buoyantly jazzy singer who became a million-selling, Grammy Award-winning pop hitmaker with her 1975 debut album and went on to even greater popularity when she followed the example of her father, Nat King Cole, in interpreting pre-rock pop standards, died on Thursday in Los Angeles. She was 65.

The cause was “ongoing health issues,” her family said. Ms. Cole had undergone a kidney transplant in 2009 and had suffered from other ailments recently, forcing the cancellation of tour dates in November and December.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 08, 2016, 10:41:23 AM
I loved Schneider!


Quote
R.I.P. Pat Harrington Jr., One Day At A Time’s Schneider
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 10, 2016, 01:15:52 PM
We lost Angus Scrimm last night... and just as Phantasm is about to get the Abrams treatment.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 10, 2016, 01:39:32 PM
But...he's a ghoul from another dimension! He can't die!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 11, 2016, 08:44:09 AM
Wow...I burst into tears when I saw the headlines about Bowie.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 11, 2016, 10:17:23 AM
I keep wanting to think it's some kind of hoax or stunt to promote his new album.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 11, 2016, 10:20:58 AM
It's completely shaken me. Much more than the other celebrity deaths in recent years. I don't know...in my mind, Bowie had this otherworldly immortality. We just watched The Prestige last night -- Tesla the weird alien-like wizard!

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 11, 2016, 10:50:39 AM
I'm more shocked because he was 69, did yoga, ate right, and as you say, looked ageless.

And he was still relevant. His new (last) album was being buzzed about a couple weeks ago, though people are saying there are clues all over the place now that he's gone.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 11, 2016, 10:57:10 AM
Click through on this. Lottos links to videos and pictures and the like, but basically his last album was conceived an executed as the final project t before he died.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/celebritynews/12092542/Bowies-last-album-was-parting-gift-for-fans-in-carefully-planned-finale.html (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/celebritynews/12092542/Bowies-last-album-was-parting-gift-for-fans-in-carefully-planned-finale.html)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on January 11, 2016, 06:04:30 PM
I've heard the video for Lazarus specifically, is quite the emotional ride knowing that he's gone.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Sirharles on January 14, 2016, 09:36:51 AM
Sad....Alan Rickman

https://www.yahoo.com/movies/s/british-actor-alan-rickman-dies-69-125725714.html
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 14, 2016, 10:06:54 AM
God...bad start to the year.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 14, 2016, 01:32:42 PM
People are saying Lemmy from Motorhead, Bowie, and Rickman are the triad, and maybe they are, though I don't believe my FB feed when that many people say they were big Motorhead fans. Hell, I wasn't that big a Motorhead fan.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 14, 2016, 02:30:31 PM
Wait...who?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 14, 2016, 02:50:21 PM
Exactly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemmy
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on January 18, 2016, 11:49:40 AM
See my FB post from 12/28: "When I saw people talking about 'RIP, Lemmy' I assumed they were using an affectionate nickname for the Clown Prince of Basketball."

Meadowlark Lemon is more in my triad than Lemmy.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 18, 2016, 06:48:52 PM
Glenn Frey of the Eagles. Man, 2016 looks to be a rough year.

http://eagles.com/news/266763 (http://eagles.com/news/266763)

Quote
It Is With The Heaviest of Hearts That We Announce…
...the passing of our comrade, Eagles founder, Glenn Frey, in New York City on Monday, January 18th, 2016.

Glenn fought a courageous battle for the past several weeks but, sadly, succumbed to complications from Rheumatoid Arthritis, Acute Ulcerative Colitis and Pneumonia.

The Frey family would like to thank everyone who joined Glenn to fight this fight and hoped and prayed for his recovery.

Words can neither describe our sorrow, nor our love and respect for all that he has given to us, his family, the music community & millions of fans worldwide.

Cindy Frey | Taylor Frey | Deacon Frey | Otis Frey|
Don Henley | Joe Walsh | Timothy B. Schmit | Bernie Leadon | Irving Azoff
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 19, 2016, 08:07:18 AM
Starting to dread this thread...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 26, 2016, 03:44:48 PM
Fish! (File under "I thought he died 30 years ago")

Quote
Abe Vigoda, sunken-eyed ‘Godfather,’ ‘Barney Miller’ actor, dies at 94
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 28, 2016, 09:51:47 PM
Man, this year...

Quote
Jefferson Airplane’s Paul Kantner dies at 74

http://m.sfgate.com/music/article/Jefferson-Airplane-s-Paul-Kantner-dies-at-74-6791483.php (http://m.sfgate.com/music/article/Jefferson-Airplane-s-Paul-Kantner-dies-at-74-6791483.php)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 29, 2016, 08:43:12 AM
Jesus...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 19, 2016, 11:40:20 AM
Harper Lee. Deid out of shame.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 20, 2016, 08:46:56 AM
Jesus...tough year.

Quote
Italian writer Umberto Eco dies at 84
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 06, 2016, 03:08:19 PM
Nancy Reagan. Just say no.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 07, 2016, 11:11:49 PM
I said no... then I got high.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 09, 2016, 12:20:10 PM
George Martin (the "fifth Beatle").
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 10, 2016, 04:49:26 PM
While he was in the " I thought he was already dead" category, he was also fucking huge in transforming pop culture while under the radar in the same way Dan O'Bannon was.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 16, 2016, 01:24:45 PM


Quote
British television and film producer, writer and voice actress Sylvia Anderson passed away March 16 after a short illness. She was known for co-creating numerous television series with Gerry Anderson, her husband between 1960 and 1981. (He died in 2012.)

Many of these series, such as Thunderbirds, featured marionettes as actors. The BBC obituary explains:

They developed a production technique using electronic marionette puppets, called Supermarionation, in which the voices were recorded first, and when the puppets were filmed, the electric signal from the taped dialogue was hooked up to sensors in the puppets’ heads.

That made the puppets’ lips move perfectly in time with the soundtrack.

In 1963, the couple came up with the idea for Thunderbirds, which told the story of the Tracy family who form a secret organisation dedicated to saving human life, set in the future.

As well as co-creating and writing the series, Anderson worked on character development and costume design.

The Thunderbirds character Lady Penelope, a glamorous agent, was modelled on Anderson’s own appearance, and she also voiced the character.

She returned to voice Lady Penelope in a 1994 episode of the sitcom Absolutely Fabulous. And when a new Thunderbirds Are Go series was produced in 2015, she was cast as the voice of Lady Penelope’s elderly Great Aunt Sylvia.

Sylvia leaves a daughter, Dee Anderson, and a son, Gerry Anderson, Jr.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 22, 2016, 03:41:32 PM
Wow... I guess it had to end this way. I'm just surprised the cancer got him before the crack.

Quote
Rob Ford, troubled and tempestuous Toronto mayor, dies at 46
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 23, 2016, 12:03:45 PM
Quote
Malik Taylor, better known as Phife Dawg, co-founder of the pioneering rap group A Tribe Called Quest, has died. There has been no official statement from his family about the cause of death, but Taylor struggled with complications from diabetes for years, and had received a kidney transplant in 2008. He was 45 years old.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 25, 2016, 09:31:36 AM
Woah...

Quote
As first reported by TMZ and confirmed to Vulture by a publicity rep for Shandling, comedian Garry Shandling has died, of unknown causes, at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica at the age of 66. His rep said only that Shandling's death was "sudden."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 28, 2016, 10:14:29 AM
Quote
Jim Harrison died March 26 at the age of 78 at his summer home in Patagonia, Arizona.

Widely considered the master of the novella, Harrison's stories often dealt with outsiders living in wild spaces, especially Michigan (where he was born), Montana, and Arizona. He is perhaps most well known for "Legends of the Fall," a story of three brothers ranging from their Montana home to the battlefields of World War I and back again. Despite its concise length, "Legends"--the title novella of the collection of the same name--is an epic of desperate acts and ruinous consequences, and was later adapted as a 1994 film that helped jumpstart Brad Pitt's early career.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 29, 2016, 04:00:24 PM
Quote
Patty Duke, star of TV, stage, and film, died Tuesday morning from complications caused by a ruptured intestine. She was 69 years old.

So.... #2016istherapture right?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Reginald McGraw on March 29, 2016, 04:02:30 PM
I think 2016 is a tipping point for people in their early 40's. Everyone we "grew up with" is starting to die now.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 29, 2016, 05:14:03 PM
I was shocked that Patty Duke was that young.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 29, 2016, 10:55:21 AM
Well...Prince. And others. I feel like we need to do the definitive obit catch-up.

Though I'm exhausted every time prince comes up in the news.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 01, 2016, 12:52:36 PM
This is a big deal (for some)

Quote
The legendary anti-war priest Father Daniel Berrigan died today at 94. He was a poet, pacifist, educator, social activist, playwright and lifelong resister to what he called "American military imperialism." Along with his late brother, Phil, Dan Berrigan played an instrumental role in inspiring the anti-war and anti-draft movement during the late 1960s as well as the anti-nuclear movement.

http://www.democracynow.org/2016/4/30/father_daniel_berrigan_anti_war_activist
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 23, 2016, 11:41:17 AM
Alan Young...


Quote
Radio, movie and TV actor Alan Young died May 19 at the age of 96. A popular and versatile comedian, he began his entertainment career on the radio at age 13, and had his own show at 17. Changing mediums, he won a 1951 Emmy Award as “Outstanding Lead Actor” for the television version of The Alan Young Show.

His best known venture into science fiction was as Filby, the Time Traveler’s loyal friend in George Pal’s The Time Machine (1960) – which he recreated in 1993 for a mini-sequel, Time Machine: The Journey Back, together with Rod Taylor as the Time Traveler. Young continued to be associated with the Wells opus, given a cameo in Simon Wells’ remake of The Time Machine (2002), and voicing the narration for 7th Voyage Productions’ animated version of The Time Machine (not yet released).
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 04, 2016, 08:31:32 AM
Quote
   
Muhammad Ali, 'The Greatest of All Time', Dead at 74

Knew it was coming, of course. Still sad.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 04, 2016, 11:32:14 AM
He was the greatest.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 19, 2016, 07:53:05 PM
Anton Yelchin, the new Chekov, dead at 27.

https://variety.com/2016/film/news/anton-yelchin-dead-star-trek-alpha-dog-1201798798/ (https://variety.com/2016/film/news/anton-yelchin-dead-star-trek-alpha-dog-1201798798/)

Quote
‘Star Trek’ Actor Anton Yelchin Dies at 27

Anton Yelchin, known for roles in “Star Trek” and “Alpha Dog,” died early Sunday morning in a freak accident, a spokeswoman confirmed to Variety. He was 27.

“Actor Anton Yelchin was killed in a fatal traffic collision early this morning,” said a statement from his representative. “His family requests you respect their privacy at this time.”

The LAPD said he was pinned by his own car at his Studio City home. Friends apparently became concerned when Yelchin did not show up for a band performance. They found him at his home pinned between his car and a brick mailbox pillar.

“It appears he had exited his car and was behind it when the vehicle rolled down a steep driveway,” the LAPD said in a statement.

Police reportedly told TMZ that the engine was still running when he was found, and that his car was in neutral. It’s not clear why he got out of his car with the engine running.

His most prominent role was as Pavel Chekhov, the Russian ensign in the rebooted “Star Trek” film series. The most recent film in the franchise, “Star Trek Beyond,” debuts on July 22.

Paramount Pictures released a statement, saying, “All of us at Paramount join the world in morning the untimely passing of Antony Yelchin. As a member of the Star Trek family, he was beloved by so many and he will missed by all. We share our deepest condolences with his mother, father and family.”

Born in Leningrad in the former Soviet Union, Yelchin and his family emigrated to the United States when he was just six months old, seeking political asylum. His parents were both star figure skaters. He began acting at an early age, launching his professional career as a 9 year-old. He impressed critics and audiences with a series of prominent roles, holding his own against the likes of Anthony Hopkins and Robin Williams while playing shy or emotionally damaged kids in the likes of “House of D” and “Hearts in Atlantis.” For two seasons he co-starred opposite Hank Azaria in the Showtime series “Huff,” playing  a precocious teenager whose life is upended by his father’s personal and professional crisis.

As a young adult, he justified that early acclaim, turning in mature, sensitively wrought performances as drug-peddling title character in “Charlie Bartlett” and as Jacob, a lovelorn college student in Drake Doremus’ “Like Crazy.” In the Los Angeles Times, critic Kenneth Turan praised Yelchin’s work in “Like Crazy” as “fearless,” writing that  he “…expertly delineates the core quietness of Jacob, his tangible seriousness and sincerity.”

Yelchin also brushed with mainstream success, appearing in “Terminator Salvation” and doing voice work on “The Smurfs” movies. Critics noted that his performance in “Odd Thomas,” based on the Dean Koontz book, was superior to the rest of the movie.

After news of Yelchin’s death broke Sunday, friends and co-stars reacted on Twitter and social media.

John Cho, who worked with Yelchin on “Star Trek,” tweeted, “I loved Anton Yelchin so much. He was a true artist – curious, beautiful, courageous. He was a great pal and a great son. I’m in ruins.”

And Kat Dennings added, “Anton Yelchin was one of my best friends. Can’t say anything that conveys what this feels like.”
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on June 20, 2016, 10:46:30 AM
Walter Koenig better get his wig ready for the next movie about how the Federation's flagship is destroyed every year!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on July 26, 2016, 04:29:25 PM
She should have seen this coming.

Quote
Miss Cleo has died at 53-years-old

The television psychic—whose real name is Youree Dell Harris—lost her battle against cancer on Tuesday and passed away in Palm Beach County, Fla., surrounded by family and friends, according to TMZ.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 15, 2016, 12:34:53 AM
I remember learning all the Star Wars cast members names when I was a kid. Seems weird to think those folks are getting old, even after *seeing* them old in The Force Awakens.

Quote
Kenny Baker, The Actor Who Brought R2-D2 to Life, Dies at 81

http://io9.gizmodo.com/kenny-baker-the-actor-who-brought-r2-d2-to-life-dies-1785245979 (http://io9.gizmodo.com/kenny-baker-the-actor-who-brought-r2-d2-to-life-dies-1785245979)
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Sirharles on August 29, 2016, 04:32:41 PM
****Gene Wilder****

http://variety.com/2016/film/news/gene-wilder-dead-dies-willie-wonka-young-frankenstein-1201846745/
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on August 29, 2016, 05:36:13 PM
The Alzheimer's diagnosis is a surprise though explains the reclusiveness in the last decades of his life.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on August 29, 2016, 05:55:10 PM
Also surprised he was 83! He's forever young in my mind. Sad.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 17, 2016, 06:36:36 AM
Edward Albee.

Though I thought he died in the 60s.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on September 17, 2016, 11:37:43 AM
Me too.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on September 17, 2016, 11:39:04 AM
Another literary hit:

Quote
William Patrick Kinsella, the Canadian author whose magical realist novel Shoeless Joe served as the inspiration for Kevin Costner’s 1989 hit Field Of Dreams, has died. Kinsella was 81.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 24, 2016, 07:27:40 AM
Quote
Tom Hayden, preeminent 1960s radical, dies at 76
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on October 27, 2016, 11:08:54 AM
Here's a creepy obit for your Thursday.

http://variety.com/2016/film/news/michael-massee-dead-dies-shot-brandon-lee-crow-1201901578/ (http://variety.com/2016/film/news/michael-massee-dead-dies-shot-brandon-lee-crow-1201901578/)

Quote
Michael Massee, ‘The Crow’ Actor Who Accidentally Shot Brandon Lee, Dies at 61

Michael Massee, who accidentally fatally shot Brandon Lee on the set of their 1994 film “The Crow,” in which he played Funboy, has died, his agent confirmed to Variety. He was 61.

Actor Anthony Delon first annouced the news in an Instagram post on Monday, writing “R.I.P. my friend Michael. You were ‘five seconds away from a clean getaway.'” Massee and Delon worked together on the 2014 French TV series “Interventions.”

Details of his death weren’t immediately available.

Massee fired the improperly prepared prop gun that killed Lee on the set of “The Crow” in 1993. Lee, the son of martial arts star Bruce Lee, died in surgery on March 31, 1993. He was 28. “The Crow,” directed by Alex Proyas, was released in May of 1994.

Massee, who reportedly never watched “The Crow,” returned to New York following the traumatic accident and took time off from acting. “I don’t think you ever get over something like that,” he said in a 2005 interview.

The actor, who has almost 80 film and television credits, is also known for his role as the man at the massage parlor in David Fincher’s 1995 thriller “Seven.” He worked with the director again in 1997 on “The Game.” His other film credits include “Lost Highway” (1997), “Catwoman” (2004), “The Amazing Spider-Man” (2012), and “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” (2014), in which he portrayed Gustav Fiers — aka The Gentleman.

On TV, Massee had recurring roles as villain Ira Gaines on the first season of the Fox’s “24” and baddie Charles Hoyt on TNT’s “Rizzoli & Isles,” in addition to making appearances in “The X-Files,” “Alias,” “Supernatural,” “House,” and “The Blacklist.”

“My heart is heavy to hear of his passing,” his “Rizzoli & Isles” costar Angie Harmon wrote on Twitter. “He was IMMENSELY talented & had the kindest soul. I am privileged to have known him.”

Jon Cassar, an executive producer on “24,” also expressed his sympathies.

“Sad to hear of the passing of Michael Massee, who played Ira Gaines, ’24’s’ first villain in season #1 RIP,” he tweeted

Massee is survived by his wife, Ellen Massee, and their two children.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 27, 2016, 11:12:30 AM
Why's it creepy?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on October 27, 2016, 11:16:26 AM
I don't know. just that 61 isn't that old... and that he was the guy who pulled the trigger on Brandon Lee. You know, Bruce Lee curse and all that jazz. Maybe it's not creepy at all.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on October 27, 2016, 11:19:17 AM
I request that you please update with the cause of death when it's announced. Because "cocaine overdose while strangling a Thai hooker" is less creepy than "hit by a falling light on set after a string of mysterious near misses and survived just long enough to fall off the gurney and bleed out on Brandon Lee's star."
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 11, 2016, 08:35:07 AM
Leonard Cohen. Sad week.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 11, 2016, 09:58:54 AM
Yeah, I couldn't bring myself to come her and post about it last night. Yesterday was a crappy day of epic proportions despite the election and this.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 14, 2016, 03:55:17 PM
Gwen Ifill. 61. Cancer.

Blah.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 15, 2016, 07:39:28 AM
Yeah. Blah indeed. Sad days.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 25, 2016, 12:27:32 PM
Florence Henderson. Mrs Brady...

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 26, 2016, 08:50:39 AM
Fidel Castro (who actually died five years ago) has died!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on November 27, 2016, 12:03:05 AM
Man, maybe I'm late to the party Castro's death is just getting swept under the "OMG! Black Friday!" rug. We have a real media problem in this country.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 27, 2016, 10:54:14 AM
Man, maybe I'm late to the party Castro's death is just getting swept under the "OMG! Black Friday!" rug. We have a real media problem in this country.

That's because he's obviously been dead since 2009.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on November 27, 2016, 10:55:54 AM
Also today: Ron Glass. Shepherd Book from Firefly but, of course, one of our great television character actors for 40 years... Sad.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 06, 2016, 09:51:20 PM
So five or more people I knew, and followed, and paid attention to died today -- among them the original Green Hornet and Maester Aemon from Game of Thrones -- but they were all in their mid 90s, so I don't feel compelled to update this thread because, you know, fair enough, right?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 08, 2016, 05:54:03 PM
John Glenn.

The 90s club isn't fairing well this week.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 09, 2016, 10:58:40 AM
So, I get far less kirked out when people in their late 80s and 90s go out I mean, I *hope* I make it that long.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 09, 2016, 11:19:28 AM
So, I get far less kirked out when people in their late 80s and 90s go out I mean, I *hope* I make it that long.

Yeah. That's why i skipped the glut of 90-somethings who died this week. But John Glenn is worth a mention.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 14, 2016, 10:01:02 AM
Alan Thicke.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 19, 2016, 09:41:38 AM
Zsa Zsa Gabor dead at 99.

I honestly thought she had died in the  early 90s... I guess that was Eva.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 19, 2016, 10:49:41 AM
Me too!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 25, 2016, 07:53:42 PM
George Michael at 53. Way too young. My guess is AIDS based on proclivities and history. He's been kind of sick for a decade now.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-38432862
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 26, 2016, 12:24:28 PM
Yeah, that AIDS cocktail is like permanent chemotherapy. Which would explain the decade of illness...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 27, 2016, 02:11:02 PM
Even with few days to get used to the idea, this one stings.

http://variety.com/2016/film/news/carrie-fisher-dead-star-wars-princess-leia-dies-1201948744/

Quote
Carrie Fisher, ‘Star Wars’ Actress and Writer Who Rocketed to Fame as Princess Leia, Dies at 60

Carrie Fisher, the actress, writer and daughter of Hollywood royalty who became internationally famous as Princess Leia of “Star Wars,” has died, Variety has confirmed. She was 60.

Fisher died Tuesday morning after suffering what was described as a massive heart attack on Friday while on a flight from London to Los Angeles. She had been in London filming episodes of the Amazon/Channel 4 comedy “Catastrophe.” Fisher was rushed from Los Angeles International Airport to UCLA Medical Center after the plane landed around noon PT.

Fisher was the daughter of actress Debbie Reynolds and singer Eddie Fisher, whose marriage famously broke up when Eddie Fisher had an affair with Elizabeth Taylor. She often remarked that she was born in the spotlight, and her life and career reflected the highs and lows of the entertainment business. Her mother’s career struggles after her 1950s heyday weighed heavily on Fisher.

“I grew up on the back side of show business. So I had no desire to go into it. It had beat up my mother,” Fisher told the New York Times in 2006. “I had a front-and-center view of how that hurt her. I understood that when they were done with you, they were done.”

Fisher demonstrated her skill as a writer with the best-selling 1987 novel “Postcards From the Edge,” about an actress struggling to rebuild her career after an overdose. Fisher wrote the screenplay for the 1990 film adaptation, directed by Mike Nichols and starring Meryl Streep and Shirley MacLaine.

Fisher also penned the autobiographical 2008 book “Wishful Drinking,” based on her one-woman stage show of the same name. She had recently been promoting her newly published memoir of her “Star Wars” years, “The Princess Diarist.”

In her writing and in public, Fisher was revealing about her battles with drugs and mental health issues. Her outspokenness about addiction earned her a lifetime achievement award from Harvard College in 2016 for cultural humanitarianism.

After her parents divorced when she was 2, Fisher was estranged from her father for decades until she became his caretaker prior to his death in 2010.

Fisher got her start in the family business at age 15, when she appeared alongside Reynolds in the 1973 Broadway revival of “Irene.” Two years later she made her film debut in the hit comedy “Shampoo” starring Warren Beatty, Julie Christie and Goldie Hawn.

But it was 1977’s “Star Wars,” later re-titled “Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope” that brought Fisher international recognition. Cloaked in white with her hair parted and tucked into two spiral side twists, the now-legendary character Princess Leia first appeared in the film as the fearless leader of the planet Alderaan, agent of the Rebel Alliance and member of the Imperial Senate.

The film earned six Oscars and launched a franchise of epic proportions. Two sequels followed “A New Hope” — “The Empire Strikes Back” in 1980 and “Return of the Jedi” in 1983 — to form what is now known as the original trilogy. Three prequels were released years later between 1999 and 2005, in which Fisher did not participate. Then, when a sequel trilogy was announced starting with 2015’s “The Force Awakens,” the actress re-joined the series.

In November 2016 Fisher revealed that while filming the original “Star Wars” she had a three-month affair with her co-star Harrison Ford, who was then married to Mary Marquardt. “It was so intense,” Fisher said of the secret affair. “It was Han and Leia during the week, and Carrie and Harrison during the weekend.”

Following the original “Star Wars” trilogy, Fisher had a steady career in Hollywood, consistently appearing in films and television, though never in roles with the same global visibility as George Lucas’ creation. Starting in the early 1990s, Fisher became a much sought-after script doctor for films.

Her performance in Nora Ephron’s 1989 romantic comedy “When Harry Met Sally” opposite Bruno Kirby was a stand-out performance, as was her role the same year in “The ‘Burbs,” a black comedy starring Tom Hanks. More recently, her guest shot on NBC’s “30 Rock” earned her an Emmy nomination in 2008. Her guest role as the caustic mother, Mia, on “Catastrophe” also earned good notices.

Her other notable film performances include “The Blues Brothers” (1980), “Garbo Talks” (1984), “Hannah and Her Sisters” (1990), “Soapdish” (1991), “Austin Powers” (1997) and “Scream 3” (2000). Her many TV appearances included guest shots on “Frasier,” “Sex and the City,” “Entourage,” “Smallville,” “Weeds,” “The Big Bang Theory” and “Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce.”  Fisher was a semi-regular voice actor on Fox’s “Family Guy,” as the boss of the brewery where patriarch Peter Griffin works.

As a writer, Fisher wrote episodes of “Roseanne” and “Young Indiana Jones.” She co-wrote the 2001 ABC TV movie “These Old Broads,” which starred Reynolds, Taylor, MacLaine and Joan Collins as actresses enjoying a sudden career revival. Fisher’s stage show “Wishful Drinking” became a 2010 HBO special that earned an Emmy nomination for variety, music or comedy special.

Fisher’s personal life was also tumultuous. She began dating musician Paul Simon in 1977 and married him in 1983, but the union lasted less than a year. Fisher had one child, daughter Billie Catherine Lourd in 1992, with CAA managing partner Bryan Lourd. Fisher’s relationship with Lourd ended in 1994 and, although they were never married, Fisher frequently referred to Lourd in interviews as her second husband. She was candid in her writing and elsewhere about the emotional experience of having Lourd leave her for a man.

In addition to her mother and daughter, Fisher’s survivors include a brother, Todd.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 27, 2016, 02:24:57 PM
And not as flashy as Fisher or Michaels...

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/dec/27/watership-down-author-richard-adams-dies-aged-96

Quote
Watership Down author Richard Adams dies aged 96
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 27, 2016, 03:53:26 PM
Hard, hard to see Carrie go.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 27, 2016, 06:17:39 PM
I'll just leave this here.

https://medium.com/@justjudyanne/2016-is-not-killing-people-984b583a0ecc#.5uxnjpbk1 (https://medium.com/@justjudyanne/2016-is-not-killing-people-984b583a0ecc#.5uxnjpbk1)

Quote
2016 Is Not Killing People
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 28, 2016, 10:14:15 AM
Yes...of course. It's still an interesting coincidence, though!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 28, 2016, 12:37:50 PM
My view is that we're simply reaching that age where the cultural icons of our youth are aging and older, and those with long standing substance abuse or health problems are just calling it a day. I don't expect the next year or the year after to be much better.

It's not like we're going to wake up on January 1, 2017 and everything will be all peachy, right? Someone will die the first week of January and the internet will be all "NOOOOO. Damn you 2017! You're an asshole!!"

I get that everybody's coping mechanisms with grief are different, but I find this whole "blaming the year" trend to betray a sort of mass hysteria that's disturbing to me. It suggests our cultural problems stem from a kind of mass disconnect from reality the likes of which modern civilization hasn't seen.

Or maybe I just spend too much time on Facebook.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 28, 2016, 01:16:09 PM
I think it's easier than admitting to ourselves that every single motherfucking year sucks.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: Sirharles on December 29, 2016, 09:29:52 AM
And then her mother...http://www.cnn.com/2016/12/29/entertainment/debbie-reynolds-dead/
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 29, 2016, 10:29:33 AM
Wow. So there's our third, RC!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 29, 2016, 11:00:45 AM
I'll just leave this here.

https://medium.com/@justjudyanne/2016-is-not-killing-people-984b583a0ecc#.5uxnjpbk1 (https://medium.com/@justjudyanne/2016-is-not-killing-people-984b583a0ecc#.5uxnjpbk1)

Quote
2016 Is Not Killing People

A counter argument, perhaps... (Not that 2016 is killing people, just that more than usual died.)

http://www.vulture.com/2016/12/2016-the-year-gen-x-lost-too-many-touchstones.html
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 29, 2016, 11:10:20 AM
I'm just going stop reading the internet. Total blackout.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on December 29, 2016, 11:13:12 AM
I'm just going stop reading the internet. Total blackout.

A month ago you told me your resolution was to never go on total blackout again!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on December 29, 2016, 12:34:21 PM
Inner turmoil!!

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 13, 2017, 02:00:10 PM
Quote
William Peter Blatty, 'The Exorcist' Writer, Dies at 89

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/william-peter-blatty-exorcist-writer-dies-at-89-964093
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 22, 2017, 11:02:06 AM
Woah...

Quote
Veteran actor Miguel Ferrer, star of RoboCop and Twin Peaks, has died

http://www.blastr.com/2017-1-19/miguel-ferrer-obituary
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 22, 2017, 11:52:51 AM
Yeah, that got lost in the inauguration craziness. He was awesome in Robocop.

Fucking cancer.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 25, 2017, 05:00:07 PM
Mary Tyler Moore.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 25, 2017, 05:18:39 PM
Why did I think she was already dead?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on January 27, 2017, 05:54:35 PM
File under "didn't he die in 1980":

Quote
Mannix' Star Mike Connors Dead at 91
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on January 27, 2017, 09:47:50 PM
John Hurt... Ugh.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4166046/Actor-John-Hurt-dies-cancer-aged-77.html

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on February 07, 2017, 07:23:16 PM
Richard Hatch. Probably a real stinger for you, Nacho.

https://www.bleedingcool.com/2017/02/07/richard-hatch-star-battlestar-galactica-dies-71/

Quote
Richard Hatch, Star Of Battlestar Galactica, Dies At 71

Golden Globe nominated actor Richard Hatch, whose career spanned nearly a half-decade, today passed into eternity while surrounded by family and friends after an extended illness. Best known as Captain Apollo in the 1978 original Battlestar Galactica, and then as Tom Zarek in the 2003 re-imagined version, His career started with a stint on All My Children in 1971 as Philip Brent, and put in appearances on series ranging from Hawaii Five-O to The Streets of San Francisco to Baywatch. In more recent years Richard has been featured in a range of independent productions.

In the decades after the original Battlestar Galactica, he had gone on to write a number of novels in the same universe and developed a short film, Battlestar Galactica: The Second Coming. Original BSG series actors John Colicos (Baltar), Terry Carter (Col. Tigh) and Jack Stauffer (Bojay) appeared in the trailer alongside Hatch. His various projects were an effort to keep the interest around the franchise alive and to try to convince Universal to revisit the series.

Richard hadn’t intended to wind up as an actor, he’d often said that it wasn’t something that had occurred to him because he was too shy and insecure. His dream before he discovered the stage was to become an Olympic pole vaulter. When an English class was overbooked in college, he wound up enrolling in an oral interpretation class instead. “It turned out to be my worst nightmare, because I had to get up in front of people and read.” he says, laughing. “I found myself flunking the course because I would choke up. I could hardly open my mouth.” Over time he managed to overcome his fears, and now helps new actors by offering acting workshops in the Los Angeles area as well as during his annual convention circuit. His classes were lauded for their ability to bring new actors out of their shells, and for helping tune skills of more experienced performers. One reviewer commented about Richard and his workshop:

Richard Hatch is a man of many gifts, not the least of which is uncanny insight into an actor’s true potential and how we get in our own way and block that potential. Richard is both very tough and very compassionate. In just six months of working together, Richard has coaxed performances out of me that I never would have dreamed possible.

Even though it’d now been nearly eight years since the ending of the re-imagined Galactica series, he had continued to host annual Battlestar Galactica panels at the San Diego Comic-Con and DragonCon, where fans would listen to his stories of the series, and of his continued enthusiasm and encouragement for its future.

Richard is survived by a son, Paul.

So say we all.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 07, 2017, 11:22:34 PM
Whew... Yes. Just coming out from the darkness now. God... Wasn't ready for that at all.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 18, 2017, 09:06:59 AM
Oh,  Doc died...

Quote
Warren Frost, the actor who played Doc Hayward in the seminal 1990s TV series Twin Peaks, has died. He was 91.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on February 26, 2017, 12:45:22 PM

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on March 19, 2017, 03:46:35 PM
'Swamp Thing' co-creator and longtime horror artist Bernie Wrightson.

http://ew.com/movies/2017/03/19/bernie-wrightson-dead-artist-dies-68/
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on March 20, 2017, 02:44:14 PM
And Chuck Berry!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 06, 2017, 05:38:55 PM
Don Rickles. Dead at 271.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 06, 2017, 06:21:09 PM
That made me laugh.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 26, 2017, 02:31:31 PM
Quote
Director Jonathan Demme Dead at 73
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on April 27, 2017, 10:01:00 AM
73 isn't old, and word was he was hard at work on a documentary. I'm putting money on heart attack.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on April 28, 2017, 08:32:23 AM
73 isn't old, and word was he was hard at work on a documentary. I'm putting money on heart attack.

My money is on auto erotic strangulation, as usual.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 15, 2017, 03:59:50 AM
Powers Booth. At a very young 68.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 18, 2017, 10:06:44 AM
Roger Ailes, dead of being evil.

And Chris Cornell, a possible suicide.

Interesting day already!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 18, 2017, 10:30:32 AM
Cornell breaks my heart in a way I can't properly express.

Ailes is dead, eh? So about Chris Cornell...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 19, 2017, 01:20:04 PM
So... *this* does not shock me in the least. Those anxiety meds are no fucking joke. It's why I just live with my anxiety.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/chris-cornells-wife-issues-statement-w483179 (http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/chris-cornells-wife-issues-statement-w483179)

Quote
Chris Cornell's Wife Issues Statement, Blames Anxiety Medicine for Suicide

"When we spoke after the show, I noticed he was slurring his words," Vicky Cornell says. "He was different"

Vicky Cornell, the wife of Soundgarden singer Chris Cornell, issued a statement Friday morning where she remembered her late husband, who died Thursday morning at the age of 52, and speculated whether his suicide was the result of taking too much of his anxiety medication.

"Chris's death is a loss that escapes words and has created an emptiness in my heart that will never be filled. As everyone who knew him commented, Chris was a devoted father and husband. He was my best friend," Vicky wrote.

"His world revolved around his family first and, of course, his music second. He flew home for Mother's Day to spend time with our family. He flew out mid-day Wednesday, the day of the show, after spending time with the children. When we spoke before the show, we discussed plans for a vacation over Memorial Day and other things we wanted to do."

However, following Soundgarden's concert Wednesday night, Vicky noticed a change in her husband's demeanor when they talked on the phone after the show.

"When we spoke after the show, I noticed he was slurring his words; he was different. When he told me he may have taken an extra Ativan or two, I contacted security and asked that they check on him," she continued. "What happened is inexplicable and I am hopeful that further medical reports will provide additional details. I know that he loved our children and he would not hurt them by intentionally taking his own life."

An attorney for the Cornell family, Kirk Pasich, reiterated Vicky's belief that an extra dosage of Ativan, an anxiety medication often employed by recovering addicts, altered Chris Cornell's mental faculties after the Detroit show. Pasich added that the Cornell family is "disturbed at inferences that Chris knowingly and intentionally took his life."

"Without the results of toxicology tests, we do not know what was going on with Chris — or if any substances contributed to his demise," Pasich said. "Chris, a recovering addict, had a prescription for Ativan and may have taken more Ativan than recommended dosages. The family believes that if Chris took his life, he did not know what he was doing, and that drugs or other substances may have affected his actions."

Pasich added that side effects of Ativan include "paranoid or suicidal thoughts, slurred speech and impaired judgment"; Vicky Cornell noted her husband's slurred speech following the Detroit concert in her statement.

She added, "The outpouring of love and support from his fans, friends and family means so much more to us than anyone can know. Thank you for that, and for understanding how difficult this is for us."

Hours after Cornell's death at a Detroit hotel, a medical examiner's report confirmed that the singer had died by suicide.

Chris Cornell, lead singer for Soundgarden, has died at age 52. Watch here.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 23, 2017, 11:30:15 AM
Roger Moore!
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 23, 2017, 12:00:48 PM
Is he the first Bond to go. Is Lazenby still around?
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 23, 2017, 12:09:31 PM
Is he the first Bond to go. Is Lazenby still around?

Well, technically David Niven was the first. But, yes, of the accepted mainstream Bonds, he's the first.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 26, 2017, 10:43:49 AM
Speaking as the only fan of the War of the Worlds TV series, this is heartbreaking...

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We’ve just learned that actor Jared Martin, who genre TV fans would remember from the short-lived Fantastic Journey series as well as the TV series adaptation of War Of The Worlds, along with a small role in the original Westworld, passed away this past Wednesday at the age of 75 at home after suffering from pancreatic cancer.

He was probably more well known as rodeo cowboy Dusty Farlow who seduced Sue Ellen Ewing only to die in a plane crash on Dallas, although he was resurrected due to fan popularity. He was also a roommate to Brian de Palma at Columbia University, who gave Martin two of his first acting jobs, in 1968’s Murder a la Mod and 1969’s The Wedding Party.

As the lead character of Dr. Harrison Blackwood in War Of The Worlds, he was one of the few characters to survive the retooling of the series in the second season, which took the show from a contemporary setting to a more post-apocalyptic world and a “second wave” of aliens take over.

Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: nacho on May 27, 2017, 05:02:18 PM
Denis Johnson just died. One of my favorite authors. Man...
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on May 27, 2017, 06:56:25 PM
Gregg Allman... To be fair, I thought he'd OD'ed years ago.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 09, 2017, 12:38:06 PM
I'm not sure I knew her name before today, but I liked her.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/glenne-headly-dead-film-tv-actress-dies-at-63-1011839 (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/glenne-headly-dead-film-tv-actress-dies-at-63-1011839)

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Glenne Headly, 'Dick Tracy' and 'Mr. Holland's Opus' Star, Dies at 63

The film and Emmy-nominated TV actress was shooting Hulu's 'Future Man.'
Glenne Headly, the Emmy-nominated TV actress and star of films such as Dick Tracy and Mr. Holland's Opus, has died, The Hollywood Reporter can confirm. She was 63.

“It is with deep sorrow that we confirm the passing of Glenne Headly,” her reps said in a statement. “We ask that her family’s privacy be respected in this difficult time.” No cause of death was given.

Headly, who most recently appeared on the big screen in The Circle and in HBO's limited series The Night Of, was in production on the Hulu series Future Man. She was starring alongside Josh Hutcherson, Ed Begley Jr., Eliza Coupe and Derek Wilson in the comedy created by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg.

Throughout her career, Headly starred in feature films such as Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, in 1988, and Sgt. Bilko, in 1996 — both alongside Steve Martin — as well aa in 1990's Dick Tracy with Warren Beatty in 1995's Mr. Holland's Opus with Richard Dreyfus. She played the mom to Joseph Gordon-Levitt's titular character in 2013's Don Juan.

In the Tom Hanks-starrer The Circle, out earlier this year, Headly and Bill Paxton played the parents of Emma Watson's character. Paxton passed away in February of this year.

Headly was nominated for an Emmy for the 1989 mini-series Lonesome Dove and went on to play memorable TV roles as Dr. Abby Keaton on NBC's ER and Karen Stottlemeyer on USA's Monk.

She began acting in stage productions, including Arms & The Man, which was directed by her ex-husband John Malkovich, and was an originating member of the Steppenwolf theatre company.

She is survived by her husband Byron McCulloch and son Stirling.
Title: Re: Obit Lineup
Post by: RottingCorpse on June 10, 2017, 01:01:40 PM
For a long time, West's Batman was the only superhero on TV. I won't say I loved the show, but I bet I watched just about every episode.

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Adam West, TV’s ‘Batman,’ Dies at 88

Adam West — an actor defined and also constrained by his role in the 1960s series “Batman” — died Friday night in Los Angeles. He was 88. A rep said that he died after a short battle with leukemia.

“Our dad always saw himself as The Bright Knight, and aspired to make a positive impact on his fans’ lives. He was and always will be our hero,” his family said in a statement.

With its “Wham! Pow!” onscreen exclamations, flamboyant villains and cheeky tone, “Batman” became a surprise hit with its premiere on ABC in 1966, a virtual symbol of ’60s kitsch. Yet West’s portrayal of the superhero and his alter ego, Bruce Wayne, ultimately made it hard for him to get other roles, and while he continued to work