Author Topic: Doctor Who: NuWho Thread  (Read 28067 times)

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #180 on: November 03, 2014, 03:42:20 PM »
Real Doctor Who fans want Joanna Lumley back:


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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #181 on: November 05, 2014, 10:40:03 AM »
In the midst of a barrage of complaints (justly so) about the grim theme of Dark Water, Tor's loving review of the episode is a breath of fresh air. They end with:

Quote
I’m calling it now, by the way: best season since the show returned. It’d be that even if next week was 43 minutes of white noise.

I think I may agree. I have complaints about this season... I think they lost their way right out of the gate, and that it was a mistake to ignore the quest for Gallifrey. Though Dark Water's little easter eggs (and other not-so-subtle hints) has me thinking that this season has merely been prologue. When we last saw The master, he was trapped back on Gallifrey -- presumably locked in combat with Rassilon. The actions in Day of the Doctor, though, would have rebooted all of that...and given The Master his chance to escape. I'm expecting Saturday's finale to finally kickstart the quest for Gallifrey -- because the Master knows where it is.

We also have a very important reboot for the Master here -- (s)he has a new TARDIS, technology, and is a serious threat to the universe without the Time Lords lying around to spoil the plans. Fingers crossed that the finale finds Michelle Gomez escaping in the confusion of battle.

Getting Clara out of the picture and giving season 35 a new start, with a new quest and a new companion, is also on my wishlist. We've spent this entire season deconstructing the Doctor, and Dark Water felt like the answer to some of the questions at the start of the season -- "Am I a good man?" Yes, he is. Forgiving Clara's betrayal is only the first step -- how better to exemplify the Doctor's inherent goodness than putting him against his Moriarty in the final reel?

Next week he'll have to face the people he's killed this season. We got a little taste of that already as Danny just did the same in Dark Water. 

Really looking forward to finale country...

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #182 on: November 05, 2014, 10:45:21 AM »

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #183 on: November 10, 2014, 10:19:58 AM »
I have to say...I kind of agree with airlock Alpha's article "Is Doctor Who Running out of Gas?" which I'm pasting below (beneath my equally long review!).

The finale was...lackluster. And it's strange, because Capaldi is great, Gomez is a-fucking-mazing... But it all fell weirdly flat. And worse, it fell flat while also doing a disservice to fans and casually killing some fan favorites. I guess we all figured Danny was toast... That's been telegraphed since the moment we met him, and especially since Listen. But it creates an absurd paradox and sort of invalidates everything we've built on this season exploring his timeline. So if the plan was to kill him (and it was), then why have these weird Danny Pink bottle episodes where his timeline is (as always with New Who) vitally important to the Doctor's own development?

The casual murder of Osgood was way, way uncalled for. It was a clumsy scene designed to show us that the Master was evil -- as if we haven't sat here for 40 years knowing that the Master was evil. Or, even for the new generation, I think we well established an evil Master in 2008-2009. But this episode wasn't for New Who fans, it was for classic fans -- with the ghost of the Brigadier, and an attitude in the script that Capaldi and Gomez are picking up where Pertwee and Delgado left off in their respective roles of Doctor v. Master, the episode demanded that the viewer not only know the 3rd Doctor's history intimately, but all of the fan-wank easter eggs were from the 2nd Doctor's era. The argument that "the fans are running the show" has never been more on target than this season's finale... And it's not really a good thing. An awareness of the past is a great thing -- in the 50th Anniversary and even with Clara's stupid storyline flitting through the Doctor's lives as the "Impossible Girl" it was fine. But it doesn't work when it's devolved to the point of a running gag.

Once again, we get the close-ended finale. Gomez is dead, the Master will regenerate into a new actor. She did a great job, but the only thing that great job showed us was how underused she was this whole season, and how much we'll miss her when they re-man the Master. This time around, the Master had a TARDIS.. she could have -- and should have -- escaped.

The underuse of Gomez is a theme in the Airlock Alpha article -- the lack of a season arc and Big Bad while, at the same time, having a season arc and a Big Bad was weird. All it achieved was to make the audience look for connections that weren't there. And the frustrating thing was that half the shit this season then went unaddressed. We don't know who was behind the Mummy on the Orient Express. The stand-alone episodes were implausible, even in the implausible universe of Doctor Who. Clara was responsible for the events in Listen? The Doctor was behind Time Heist? Nothing came of Into the Dalek except a pointless reference to a 2nd Doctor serial? Et cetera.

We finally -- finally -- get a hint of what this season was supposed to be about: The hunt for Gallifrey. When the Master mentions Gallifrey, the Doctor acts like he's been searching for it all along. That's news to us! Her lie is met with the Doctor having a tantrum, which is a bizarre reaction for a man who spent the entire season doing nothing except catering to Clara. Are we being asked to assume that the Doctor is spending all his time off camera hunting for Gallifrey and we're just tuning in for little side distractions? We want to watch the show where he's searching for the Time Lords!

And Clara... Clara, Clara. Her name came before Capaldi's in the titles, and her face was featured in place of Capaldi's. This, I presume, is intended to fool us because she claims to be the Doctor in the teaser -- a quick, throw-away, meaningless scene where she's obviously just buying time and is quickly defeated.

This little voice nags me that Capaldi is the one leaving in the Christmas episode and that JLC is the new Doctor. This sounds crazy, and no one else is saying it, but there's something deeply wrong with this show and I'm betting on that. We still haven't answered the "Impossible Girl" question, the TARDIS recognizes her, we learn in this episode that she remembers things she was supposed to have forgotten, and, in Listen, the TARDIS took her to the Doctor as a boy -- the safe place. She, seemingly, understood this, and forced the Doctor to leave without asking questions. And let's go ahead and say it -- the mysterious handwriting in "listen" was hers.




Quote
Do you remember what it felt like back in 2005?

We as fans were still on a major high, enjoying the fact that after years of waiting, "Doctor Who" had returned. And boy did it. We loved Christopher Eccleston. We loved Billie Piper. And despite the corny soundtrack and rather questionable special effects for the time, we weren't paying attention.

That's because Russell T. Davies enthralled us with a hidden continuing story arc, the Bad Wolf track, that came to an exciting conclusion with Rose looking into the heart of the Tardis itself, and using it to set up so much more in the Doctor Who universe.

What ever happened to those days? It's sad that less than a decade later, I no longer have the same enthusiasm as I once did for "Doctor Who." And it has nothing to do with Peter Capaldi. In fact, I really like his version of the Doctor, and I accepted him in the role right from the beginning.

What I have not accepted is this pedestrian attempt at storytelling that came to a head this weekend when Steven Moffat and crew completely underwhelmed viewers with a boring Zombie Cybermen/The Master episode that really put a big question mark at the end of everything done so far.

When we first got a glimpse of Missy at the beginning of this season, I had some high hopes that she would be really someone special. I mean, I'm not an expert in classic "Doctor Who," but I do know enough about the history of the show to think of many amazing and awesome possibilities Missy could be. And each time I would share some of those theories, others would come back and say, "No, I bet it's The Master."

And with all those tantalizing possibilities, what do we get? The Master. And a boring one.

Not to say anything about Michelle Gomez, who played Missy great. She did the best she could with the story she was provided, and it just felt ... uninspired.

Even when it was revealed that Missy first connected The Doctor to Clara, and put the ad in the paper, I still was not impressed. This was no Bad Wolf. It was definitely no Saxon. It wasn't even a Torchwood. The revelation that The Master was orchestrating everything made me yawn. And I'm betting I was not alone.

I was talking to a good friend of mine this weekend after watching the episode, who also felt like she was in no hurry to see it, and didn't feel like she missed much when she did. I was trying to recount just aspects of the episode I liked — Gomez, Capaldi, and the wonderful scene between Clara and The Doctor in the volcano, ending with "Go to hell." To me, that was the most moving part of the entire two-parter.

But then I realized something: It was the most moving part of the entire season. I actually went back in my mind and started reviewing all the episodes leading up to this, and it was a bloodbath in terms of interesting story.

Deep Breath
Traditional new Doctor episode, bringing back some familiar characters, and having some fun holding our breath. But nothing really stands out, and some of the interaction between Clara and Madame Vastra seemed forced and unnecessary (like the whole veil conversation -- wasn't Clara in shards, helping the Doctor in many ways? Why would a regeneration be so new to her?)

Into the Dalek
Shared way too much detail about the Daleks. The thing I like about bad guys is knowing as little as possible about them. Think about how awesome the Borg were, even after "Star Trek: First Contact," and then think about how much you liked them once "Star Trek: Voyager" was done with them.

Robot of Sherwood
Hated this episode. Not a single redeeming shred of value to this.

Listen
I really liked the idea of creating some retcon significance to the barn the War Doctor chose in the 50th anniversary special. But that was about it. The rest of the time, I was just confused.

Time Heist
This episode moved at such a fast pace, it felt like it was originally written as a two-parter (or should've been). I didn't buy the end where The Doctor was the one leading everything (and called it right from the start).

The Caretaker
Felt like the writers here wanted to do an episode similar to "School Reunion," which featured the late Elisabeth Sladen, but ended up feeling more like an episode of the children's spinoff to the show — "The Sarah Jane Adventures." I'm all for "Doctor Who" being a family show, but that is still different than being a children's show.

Kill the Moon
The Moon is nothing more than a big egg? That's a horrible idea. and completely uninspired. Also, has anyone noticed that we have had seven episodes to this point, and five of them were on Earth? And then we finally get ...

Mummy on the Orient Express
It was great that the Orient Express came up more than once, and we finally get there. And I really did like this story overall. I liked what the mummy was, and what was needed to fix it. Plus, ticking clocks are great for dramatic effect. This was a highlight of the season.

Flatline
Back to Earth, and while this enemy seemed interesting, the story itself was not.

In the Forest of the Night
Once again, the Tardis becomes Romper Room for kids, who don't seem to care about the mysteries of the Tardis. And once again, people are asked to just forget about something major that happens -- trees popping up everywhere, to protect the Earth from some solar flare. This would've made the film "Knowing" obsolete, which I would give $25 to anyone who could make that true.

Then we get to the finale, and there are really only two trains of thought that I have with this. Either Steven Moffat goes back and focuses on one project (choose between "Sherlock" and "Doctor Who"), or it's time for a break.

In my opinion, BBC made a huge mistake when they pushed forward in the 1980s to keep "Doctor Who" going, when it obviously needed a breather. If it had just taken a few years off after Colin Baker, I think the break from "Doctor Who" would've been far, far, far, shorter than what it was.

Even a short break can do wonders. Look at the break we had in the David Tennant era. Don't get me wrong, I felt the fourth season finished strong. Yes, the Daleks in the finale were not the greatest, but bringing everyone together, and having that wonderful moment of everyone piloting the Tardis made it worth it.

And then we had some specials over 2009, and returned with new episodes in 2010 with a new Doctor, and Moffat on board. That next season was a lot of fun, and right up to the end with the Pandorica and rebooting the Earth, we had a lot of fun.

Even the next season had far more gems than lumps of coal. And it wasn't until we reached the seventh season that the series started going off the rails. I mean, look at "Dinosaurs on a Spaceship" and "The Angels Take Manhattan."

The second half of the season did pick up a little, and the Trenzalore storyline was good (even Clara's revelation was interesting). But there were a lot of duds in that season. And "Hide" was probably the better of the failures (did I mention "Dinosaurs on a Spaceship"? Oh, I did?)

I love "Doctor Who," and I want to keep loving "Doctor Who." And I love Capaldi.

But I don't love these stories this last season, including the finale. And unless we want to go a couple decades without "Doctor Who" again, then maybe it's time to catch our breath, maybe even refreshen the writer team (including the person who is leading it). Let's put in some new ideas. Hell, I would love to see what Jack Kenny from "Warehouse 13" would do with a show like this, even if he is American.

Above all else, let's not have Capaldi turn into Sylvester McCoy -- a great actor for The Doctor, but a victim of a franchise experiencing heavy fatigue.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2014, 10:48:12 AM by nacho »

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #184 on: November 10, 2014, 10:43:59 AM »
Blastr has a sort of strange article on the gender politics of the finale today. Apparently, this whole female Master thing is making people all squirrelly.

http://www.blastr.com/2014-11-7/good-bad-and-ugly-sexual-politics-missy-being-you-know-who-doctor-who

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The good, the bad and the ugly sexual politics of Missy being You Know Who on Doctor Who

Doctor Who is changing in ways it never has before, but is that a good thing? Well ...

Before we begin, if you haven't seen "Dark Water," avert your eyes because SPOILERS.

Last chance ...

So. Missy is the Master. After first debuting on the second of January 1971 one of the Doctor's greatest nemeses has done something he's never done before -- he's become a she. And though there has been talk in the past about Time Lords becoming Time Ladies, it's never officially happened with such a major character.

But is that good? I don't mean for Doctor Who -- I mean culturally and sociologically. Is having a major villain from one of the most popular family programs of the last half century swap genders good for us as a civilization? Don't laugh; I'm serious. Our entertainment, our storytelling is like a stone pitched into the pond of life -- it has ripples. And this decision to regenerate the Master will impact not just Doctor Who but other fiction and actual peoples' lives. So let's talk about it.

THE GOOD

The Master changing genders is another step in the human race acknowledging that gender is not as simple as what a doctor says you are at birth after smacking your behind. Yes, the Master is an alien, and yes, she's not technically the first Time Lord to become a Time Lady. But we all know who the Master is, and that's a big deal. Not everyone knows a person who changes their gender presentation in real life, so the best they have is what they see on television and in film.

You might not think that children watching will be more likely to respect transgender and genderqueer people, but they will be. Just seeing that gender can, in any way, be changed will subconsciously cause kids to take on board the notion that, hey, maybe that's not so weird.

And, yes, that is a very good thing. Accepting infinite human diversity is one of the thematic goals in a lot of science fiction for a reason.

That being said ...

THE BAD

When the Master first returned back in the 2007 episode, "Utopia," he brought something that then showrunner Russell T Davies may or may not have intended -- sexual tension between the Doctor and the Master. Yes, it's no secret that both then-Doctor David Tennant and John Simm are easy on the eyes, but I'm not sure anyone could have expected just how many photo manipulations fans would create pairing the two actors together in very, ahem, intimate ways.

And that wasn't the first time Who fandom had ever considered the notion of the Doctor and Master pairing romantically, either. Even back in the Pertwee/Delgado days, there were fans who saw the potential. And one of those fans could very well have been the very openly gay Russell T Davies, who went on to run the show. With that in mind, it's not surprising that his involvement, plus the advent of the Internet, led to even more people seeing that the Master and the Doctor had a little of that love-hate thing going. And while it was never specifically stated, being surrounded by many other queer characters during the RTD run set a continuing precedent for there to be queer visibility on the show, which was great considering how many LGBT fans Who has had from the very beginning.

So the idea of the Doctor and the Master engaging in epic makeouts? Great! But having the Master become a woman to finally make it happen? Eh. Significantly less great. By requiring a gender change to make this pairing happen, the show is extracting some of the innate queerness of the show.

Remember when Captain Jack Harkness kissed the Ninth Doctor in "The Parting of the Ways," thus saying that, yes, the Doctor's sexuality is probably a little fluid and soldifying the notion that queer folks can play the heroes too? That's the kind of thing a groundswell of fans hoped might happen with the Master, too. But by making the Master a woman instead, we get something that borders a little on queer erasure.

On top of that, the Master forces the kiss onto the Doctor. It's very clear the Doctor wants no part of what's happening, and that's before he even knows the identity of the person who's nonconsensually snogged him.

Yes, the Master is the baddie, but we've already had enough nonconsensual smooching on the show since Moffat took over. Which segues us nicely into ...

THE UGLY

An article about a female Doctor has been written for this very site. And I've written one, too, elsewhere. The overwhelming response to both those articles (and many others positing the same) has been clear -- THE DOCTOR CAN NEVER EVER BE A WOMAN!

And there has, to my thinking, never been a coherent argument as to why, other than "It hasn't happened before, so ...", and that's not terribly compelling. The other argument, "People will stop watching if the Doctor is a woman," is pretty ugly, too. Why would you stop watching? Because women?

I open up that can of worms for a reason -- while some people were equally troubled by a Master-turned-Missy, many more were fine with the change. Which sounds great until you hear the reasons why. The prevailing fan reasons why the Master can be a woman but the Doctor cannot are:

The Master is unpredictable
The Master is crazy
The Master is evil
There's a word for when someone describes an individual as "crazy" and "evil" for changing their gender presentation -- transmisogyny. And that's effectively what's happening here.

Saying the Master is bad and crazy so he can become a she, but the Doctor is good and sane so he would never do the same, carries with it the subtext that trans people are devious tricksters, liars, people of ill will and sinister motivation. In short: They are the bad guys. That's what your brain is intuiting by saying the Master can be a she because of her nefarious character, but the Doctor cannot.

Look, I want to watch Michelle Gomez play the Master and focus on what a great job she's doing. Michelle Gomez could be the best Master ever. But instead of thinking about that, I'm distracted by the knowledge that anyone who doesn't look or act quite like the gender they were assigned at birth has very good reason to be afraid every time they walk out their front door. Because to a lot of people trans folks will never be the Doctor, only the Master. And that is more terrifying than any Cyberman attack.

So, if I'm being honest, even though I want it, even though I think Michelle Gomez is wonderful in the part, I don't think the Master being played by a woman is all good news. But it is necessary if we can ever hope to live in a world where the Master showing up is a surprise twist because she's done something genuinely shocking, which presenting as a different gender oughtn't be.

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #185 on: November 10, 2014, 11:11:15 AM »
Blastr is spot-on regarding the "epic make-outs" comment... Missy has been throwing herself at the Doctor. Hugs, deep kisses, putting his hands on her breasts. The overtly sexual/intimate contact is bizarre. This is one of the Doctor's greatest enemies -- the Master has killed the Doctor once (and was indirectly responsible for killing him a second time). The childhood friends aspect was played up magnificently with John Simm, but when the same language was used here while she humped the Doctor's leg it was just weird and embarrassing. So, okay, your best friend from childhood is now a woman. Does that mean you're immediately having sex? The only lesson there was that you cannot have friends who are a different gender -- a lesson New Who has constantly been giving children. Rose loves the Doctor, Martha loves the Doctor, Donna protests too much about not loving the Doctor, River is the Doctor's long time wife, the TARDIS is female and in love with the Doctor -- his fucking ship! -- Amy Pond loves the Doctor and it fucks up her relationship, Clara feels like the Doctor is her boyfriend and that language is used on screen.

I've been saying this throughout the whole revival -- the Doctor is a 1000 (now 2000) year old alien. He's a grandfather, he had a family. He's survived an apocalyptic war and he's seen the first and the last day of the universe, and all the days in between.

Yes, he's always had a lithesome companion, but he's never been attracted to them -- and this is not strange!   No matter how young the actor, we all know the Doctor is an ancient alien. But instead of the fatherly (or grandfatherly) relationship with his companions, we get something that is just this side of creepy and dangerous -- he loves them, falls in love with them, and we are given the implication that there's more to their relationship off screen.

So besides telling us that boys can never ever hang out with girls as friends, we're also being told, when you look at it in the right light, that it's okay to be preyed upon by older men.

Writing the Doctor is hard when you have to write a know-it-all ancient alien. Capaldi is an attempt to recapture the classic Doctors, but then all we do is replace the 18 year old girlfriend with a 2000 year old girlfriend. The Master's obsession with the doctor has always run deep -- as a nemesis. Not as unrequited love, which is what this season was all about.

It's awkward, childish, insulting, and terrible.

The show is afraid of the Doctor. The show doesn't know how to deal with the Doctor. And this is bizarre to me because the concept is beyond simple -- it's always back to "the madman in a blue box."

I appreciated this season's deconstruction of the Doctor but, in the process, they also deconstructed the show -- at times literally, as in Into the Dalek and the Master and Cybermen in the finale. A sudden, detail-focused intimacy on what makes bad guys tick... And, strangely, the show always falls back on a simple explanation. Daleks are evil because they have a circuit that makes them evil. Cybermen are evil because they have an emotion inhibitor. The Master is evil because she looked into the un-tempered schism. The Doctor is good because he's "not bad."

All of this boils down to another very bizarre lesson from this season -- no one is responsible for their actions, good or bad. (Missy collecting people that the Doctor convinced to die comes to nothing, on that topic.) The 11th Doctor was all about responsibility, as were most of his predecessors. Capaldi's Doctor is a man who washes his hands and allows fate -- or whimsy -- to control him. Paying lip service to whether or not he's a good man is pointless not just because his redemption was the single most important theme in the last two 50th Anniversary episodes, but because nobody is bad. His enemies can't control their actions, and have no free will, and, when the circuits are turned off, they show themselves to not only be inherently good, but greater heroes than anyone who has come before.



 

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #186 on: November 10, 2014, 03:11:11 PM »
Under extreme fire for killing Osgood, Moffatt said the following:

Quote
The Master-stroke-Missy would have to kill somebody we liked in the most cruel, heartless, and terrible way to absolutely say that this person is shockingly evil. Osgood was the one we flung in the fire to make the Master burn brighter.

Which gets back to what I said in previous posts. The Master has been evil since 1971. There's no question. There's never been a question. He left a wide swath of death and fire and terror just four years ago. Moffatt might as well be talking about Adolf Hitler.

But he wouldn't be...because, like The Master, you wouldn't have to establish Hitler's evilness. And, yet, here we are... So weak in the storytelling that we need to re-establish a character's traits every single time they show up, seemingly for the sole benefit of the writer's room.

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #187 on: November 12, 2014, 05:02:14 PM »
Gomez just spoiled season 9! She's confirmed that she (as The Master) will be back next season.

This is good, though, and makes me feel better about the finale...

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #188 on: November 17, 2014, 01:55:25 PM »
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/doctor-who-showrunner-confirms-peter-749557

Quote
'Doctor Who' Showrunner Confirms Peter Capaldi to Return for Season 9

However, Stephen Moffat said Jenna Coleman was yet to sign up

Peter Capaldi’s 12th incarnation of Doctor Who will run at least two seasons, it was confirmed Monday.

Speaking to The Hollywood Reporter after an event in London to mark the DVD release of the BBC series’ recently completed eighth season, showrunner Steven Moffat said that Peter Capaldi was returning.

"Yes, he’s confirmed,” Moffat said, although he later added that Jenna Coleman, who has played the Time Lord’s companion Clara Oswald for the past two years, had not, something that could fuel rumors in the U.K. press that she is to leave the show following the upcoming Christmas special.

At the DVD launch event, Capaldi, Coleman and Moffat were joined on stage with Michelle Gomez, who played Doctor Who’s nemesis the Master in the latest series, and Samuel Anderson, who played Clara’s boyfriend Danny Pink.

In a Q&A, Gomez said that finding out she was playing the first female incarnation of the Master was “up there with being Hillary Clinton."

Capaldi also revealed that he was initially approached to audition for the part of the eighth Doctor Who in 1996’s unsuccessful TV film reboot attempt, eventually played by Paul McGann.

"But I turned down the opportunity," he said. "I loved it so much that I didn’t want to have the disappointment of going for something that I would never get."

The Q&A followed the world premiere of Earth Conquest: The Doctor Who World Tour, chronicling the cast’s 12-day promotional tour in August that covered seven cities across five continents. The documentary, which focuses on the series’ vast international network of fans, is included with the DVD.

In a separate release Monday, it was announced that ratings for the first 10 episodes of Doctor Who season eight were up 23 percent on season eight in the U.S., without revealing exact figures. The season premiere was the show’s highest-rated premiere ever on BBC America.

In the U.K., the season snared an average consolidated audience of 7.4 million viewers, an increase of 39 per cent on the overnight figures. At an event last week, Moffat denied that there had been a ratings drop and that U.K. viewing figures “are the same” as the previous season when including delayed viewing.

"It's been an outstanding debut series for Peter Capaldi as Doctor Who and I'm very grateful to Peter, Steven Moffat and everyone involved," said Danny Cohen, director of BBC Television, in a statement.

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #189 on: November 17, 2014, 02:31:47 PM »
Yeah, Capaldi has already said as much.

JLC is being playful. Most agree that there's going to be some sort of final conclusion to Clara's storyline at Christmas. Right now, it looks (and sounds) like it'll be an afterlife happily ever after with Danny bullshit thing...

There are also rumors that the next companion will not be a perky Earth-girl from the modern day.

Either way, there's no way they can keep the lid on changing out companions till Christmas day.

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #190 on: December 11, 2014, 10:28:54 AM »
RC -- watch this and let me know what happens to your brain.


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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #191 on: December 11, 2014, 03:27:10 PM »

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #192 on: December 16, 2014, 08:28:01 AM »
An interview where fans complained about the show turning inot "The Clara Show" saw the Moff reply, "Well, you need to understand Clara better. Clara thinks it's the Clara Show."

Um...okay. Except Clara doesn't exist. You're writing here. You made her. So if there's some grand multi-seasonal plan to reveal something, great. But, man, get to it. God. We don't want the Clara Show. 

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #193 on: December 16, 2014, 09:00:38 AM »
He's gone George Lucas.

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Re: Doctor Who: Season 34: The Capaldi Years
« Reply #194 on: December 16, 2014, 10:35:47 AM »
He's gone George Lucas.

It's back to the article I cited in the superheros thread -- Doctor Who has fallen in love with itself. The Beeb's been blinded. I don't blame Moff, I blame the whole system that's cashing in on the franchise (the GoTG Honest Trailer also hit this nail on the head in re a studio drunk on its own power and success -- Fuck you, it's Doctor Who. Because, yes. What are you going to fucking do? Watch reruns of Buffy?